Depression worse in evening?

Posted by LyndaMM @lyndamm, Jul 22, 2016

I have Major Depression, recurrent. I take Prozac for my depression, I’ve tried several others but Prozac works best for me. I also take Effexor, low dose, to help cope with the hot flashes and other side effects of the drug I’m on to try to prevent a return of breast cancer. Recently I have found that my depression gets worse in the evening, I hate to see the evening come aound. Does anyone else experience this and if so how do you cope? Right now my depression is a little worse but I think it’s due to having had open heart surgery 7 weeks ago.

@callalily74

I can tell you what I do every evening to reduce my depression or anxiety. I self medicate and that, along with my many meds, has been a lifesaver.

Jump to this post

Hi @lesbatts. I am well aware of the dangers you are talking about and have not and never will do that. What I’m talking about is harmless and my doctors are aware of it. BTW, I was not talking about meditation LOL, but I do believe in practicing that on a regular basis for one’s mental and physical health. I don’t ever drink alcohol. I hate it. I’m 75 years old, and have had low grade depression and anxiety for as long as I can remember. Don’t be concerned about me. I would never indulge in anything you are referring to.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Lynda, I’d like to bring a few members into the conversation @kareniowa @nhaegele @liz223 @dawn_giacabazi @wolfer1975 who have written about depressaion, as well as @crhp194 and @thankful who haven’t written about depression and anxiety as well as managing heart issues.

You may also be interested in joining this discussion https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/i-have-been-on-so-many-anti-depressants-over-the-past-35/

@lyndamm, how do you help yourself face the dread of the evening coming around?

Jump to this post

I’m sorry but I must have misled you. It is my husband who just had the open-heart surgery. And he’s doing very well, with me as his caregiver. And he isn’t even depressed. I can’t imagine what it would be like if he was prone to a mood disorder, also. I’ve had other major things in my life-one was my father dying when I was 5, and nobody talked about it my whole life. I don’t know exactly when this little black cloud started hovering over my head. I am thankful now that I’m 75 and am taking goof meds ordered from my psychiatrist.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Lynda, I’d like to bring a few members into the conversation @kareniowa @nhaegele @liz223 @dawn_giacabazi @wolfer1975 who have written about depressaion, as well as @crhp194 and @thankful who haven’t written about depression and anxiety as well as managing heart issues.

You may also be interested in joining this discussion https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/i-have-been-on-so-many-anti-depressants-over-the-past-35/

@lyndamm, how do you help yourself face the dread of the evening coming around?

Jump to this post

Let me try to detangle the confusion. Callalily, @lesbatts was replying to @lyndamm who started this discussion saying that she had open heart surgery 7 weeks ago, but that she also deals with depression. As @crhp194 points out, experiencing depression after heart surgery is quite common. Studies show that up to 33 percent of heart attack patients end up developing some degree of depression. You can read more about it in this article from the American Heart Association http://bit.ly/2amdotX

Callalily, I’m happy to hear that your husband has not experienced mood swings or depression since his heart surgery. As his caregiver, you may want to be on the lookout for this as it can be a delayed reaction.

Lesbatts, did you experience depression before your major medical events, breast cancer and heart surgery? Or is this a new diagnosis?

REPLY
@dawn_giacabazi

Hi Lynda,
Would love to share information on biofeedback. Here is a great link.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/biofeedback/home/ovc-20169724

The training I received involved several electical monitoring devices. They taught me how to contral my breathing, heart rate, muscles, body temp. Then we made a recording of one of my training sessions for the difficult times and need a reminder on how to do it.

Most insurance companies cover this therapy. You can receive biofeedback training in physical therapy clinics, medical centers and hospitals.

Jump to this post

I also live in a small town and travel to Boston which is two hours away but it is worth it as I have Bipolar Disorder and I go to the Bipolar Clinic down there. Most of the doctors there were trained at Harvard Medical School.

REPLY

Hello, I felt like I needed to send you a hopeful note. First of all, I am
a retired nurse so I know a bit about what I am talking about. Heart
surgery in and of itself causes depression, so many changes to your body
and lifestyle. I f you are able to get out and take short walks in the
day/evening you might feel much better. Summer nights are soooo looong! I
get down in the evening too, I live in hot Arizona, and am recovering from
back surgery. I don’t go out til the sun is almost down. I also have an
intolerance to heat so summers here are not my favorite season. You also
might try a support group, just being able to talk with others about the
way you feel is really soothing, you can help each other and maybe set up a
phone call or visit for coffee, or ice tea, or whatever. Hope some of these
suggestions help you- you could also be open with your doctor and tell
him/her that you may need an added anti-depressant, at least til you are
feeling better. God bless you and feel better! Diane

Liked by Vickie

REPLY
@68dian

Hello, I felt like I needed to send you a hopeful note. First of all, I am
a retired nurse so I know a bit about what I am talking about. Heart
surgery in and of itself causes depression, so many changes to your body
and lifestyle. I f you are able to get out and take short walks in the
day/evening you might feel much better. Summer nights are soooo looong! I
get down in the evening too, I live in hot Arizona, and am recovering from
back surgery. I don’t go out til the sun is almost down. I also have an
intolerance to heat so summers here are not my favorite season. You also
might try a support group, just being able to talk with others about the
way you feel is really soothing, you can help each other and maybe set up a
phone call or visit for coffee, or ice tea, or whatever. Hope some of these
suggestions help you- you could also be open with your doctor and tell
him/her that you may need an added anti-depressant, at least til you are
feeling better. God bless you and feel better! Diane

Jump to this post

Thank you for your reply, I know I need to get out at least once a day. My grandson is going to start taking me somewhere where it is flat and I can walk. I live on the Oregon coast so at least heat is not an issue, rain is but it’s our drier season. I would love to find a support group, unfortunately there is none anywhere near me.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Lynda, I’d like to bring a few members into the conversation @kareniowa @nhaegele @liz223 @dawn_giacabazi @wolfer1975 who have written about depressaion, as well as @crhp194 and @thankful who haven’t written about depression and anxiety as well as managing heart issues.

You may also be interested in joining this discussion https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/i-have-been-on-so-many-anti-depressants-over-the-past-35/

@lyndamm, how do you help yourself face the dread of the evening coming around?

Jump to this post

I never had breast cancer or open heart surgery. There seems to be some misunderstanding with this conversation.

REPLY

I am trying to clear up some misunderstandings about my posts. I had breast cancer and a radical mastectomy when I was 29. My husband had a heart attack and triple bypass surgery 6 weeks ago. I am 75 and he is 71. I hope this clears up any misunderstandings. I have been afflicted with PDD forever. That is Persistent Depressive Disorder.

REPLY

“Diurnal variation of depressive symptoms appears to be part of the core of depression. Yet longitudinal investigation of an individual’s pattern regularity, relation to clinical state, and clinical improvement reveals little homogeneity. Morning lows, afternoon slump, evening worsening – all can occur during a single depressive episode. Mood variability, or the propensity to produce mood swings, appears to be the characteristic that most predicts capacity to respond to treatment. Laboratory studies have revealed that mood, like physiological variables such as core body temperature, is regulated by a circadian clock interacting with the sleep homeostat. … Diurnal variation of depressive symptoms (DV) with early-morning worsening is considered a core feature of melancholia in both DSM-1V and I CD criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD).This is not the only pattern, however: an afternoon slump or evening worsening also occurs. …”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181887/ Wirz-Justice, Anna. “Diurnal variation of depressive symptoms.” Dialogues in clinical neuroscience 10, no. 3 (2008): 337.

Patients with a major depressive disorder and morning lows and/or evening worsening might consider light therapy.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_therapy#Mood_and_sleep_related

REPLY

Thank you, David. A little too scientifically oriented, but the main thing I got out of it was: Mood swings, which I absolutely have, are a definitive characteristic of depression, any time of day. P.S. This morning I woke up very depressed, and then after some food, a shower, and a phone call from my daughter put me back in an acceptable mood.

Liked by Ali Skahan

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.