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nikki16
@nikki16

Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 26, 2016

dealing with anxiety without medication

Posted by @nikki16, Nov 25, 2016

Would like to find a way to deal with anxiety without meds

Liked by mich1513

REPLY

Hello @nikki16,
Welcome to Connect; we are so happy to have you!

There are so many wonderful members here, who have discussed anxiety and the many ways to deal with it; allow me to introduce you to @nojeanius, @jimhd, @rspaulling, @heatherf316, @quazar, @thinktherapy, @jay_baruch, @missyb57, @mamasitalucita, @twptrustrek, @djabber, @roxie43. I am confident they will have much advice to offer you.

You may also wish to join in on a recent discussion: “Do you use your anxiety in a productive fashion?”
http://mayocl.in/2gwQq5O

@nikki16, can you tell us a little more about the kind of anxiety you experience? What have you tried to not allow these feelings to interfere with your daily life?

Hello nikki16 – Great question – Many of us wish the same thing.
After some practice, I was able to reduce mine through concentrated
breathing.

Breathe slower… 1,2,3,4
and out… 5,6,7,8
works best for me!

If I can make it to the count of 4 as I breathe out, I’m stable.
– count of 8 doing great!

Something called Neuroplasticity & Psychoneuroimmunology can change the
way anxiety affects you?

Good Luck

@kanaazpereira

Hello @nikki16,
Welcome to Connect; we are so happy to have you!

There are so many wonderful members here, who have discussed anxiety and the many ways to deal with it; allow me to introduce you to @nojeanius, @jimhd, @rspaulling, @heatherf316, @quazar, @thinktherapy, @jay_baruch, @missyb57, @mamasitalucita, @twptrustrek, @djabber, @roxie43. I am confident they will have much advice to offer you.

You may also wish to join in on a recent discussion: “Do you use your anxiety in a productive fashion?”
http://mayocl.in/2gwQq5O

@nikki16, can you tell us a little more about the kind of anxiety you experience? What have you tried to not allow these feelings to interfere with your daily life?

Jump to this post

My anxiety takes over my nights, I,m overwhelmed with thoughts & visions of almost my whole life, always thinking the worst & rarely any happy thoughts, but am mostly ok during the days.

@kanaazpereira

Hello @nikki16,
Welcome to Connect; we are so happy to have you!

There are so many wonderful members here, who have discussed anxiety and the many ways to deal with it; allow me to introduce you to @nojeanius, @jimhd, @rspaulling, @heatherf316, @quazar, @thinktherapy, @jay_baruch, @missyb57, @mamasitalucita, @twptrustrek, @djabber, @roxie43. I am confident they will have much advice to offer you.

You may also wish to join in on a recent discussion: “Do you use your anxiety in a productive fashion?”
http://mayocl.in/2gwQq5O

@nikki16, can you tell us a little more about the kind of anxiety you experience? What have you tried to not allow these feelings to interfere with your daily life?

Jump to this post

Rarely is a start,
hold on to those happy feelings and thoughts
even to the point of writing them down.

Seems simple, but not always easy
especially at night? Repeat the Happy feelings
you can imagine – try writing them down and
use those to flush out the negative self-talk?

Good Luck, and “Happy” Dreams…

Cognitive behavior therapy. Every bad, anxkous thought, I deal with one at a time. I talk to myself and say, “That is silly or stupid, or what is the worst thing that can happen to me?

Dealing with anxiety on a daily basis can be exhausting work…the key is to never give up. I use box breathing, relaxation videos (on YouTube) and distraction activities such as crocheting, watching TV, and light housekeeping tasks. Good luck and I wish you well as you search for inner peace.

nikki16 some of the ways that I have dealt with anxiety was to be active by exercising, going for walks, or just changing my environment for a moment or as much time as I can. Talking with someone is helpful like you are doing on this sight. Anxiety itself can be caused by so many things that sometimes it pops in on you or sometimes it builds up. Everyone some time or another experiences anxiety. Either way I can understand why you do not want medication it could be so controlling and have an effect on your body. You could seek counseling and just say no medication such as counselors, social workers and psychologists. They do the counseling and do not subscribe medication. But either way keep well and keep in touch

Liked by blanche1958

@sue1

Dealing with anxiety on a daily basis can be exhausting work…the key is to never give up. I use box breathing, relaxation videos (on YouTube) and distraction activities such as crocheting, watching TV, and light housekeeping tasks. Good luck and I wish you well as you search for inner peace.

Jump to this post

Welcome to Connect, Sue.
Can you explain box breathing?

In 2017, I am trying meditation to help change my relationship with anxiety. It doesn’t necessarily make the anxious thoughts go away, but it is slowly changing my relationship to them. I find I am more able to observe the anxious thought and not get caught up in it. That helps reduce the physiological reactions, which dampens the cycle of anxious thought => physical reaction => more anxious thoughts (and so on).

If you are interested in exploring this, I’ve found a book that might be helpful. It’s called The Mindful Way Through Anxiety by Susan Orsillo and Lizabeth Roemer. Both have PhD’s in Psychology so they are well-qualified to write on the subject. There is also a book on the Mindful Way Through Depression with different authors. I’ve read both and found both helpful. I second the comments of others about counseling. I’ve done that in the past too and it was helpful, but I like the idea of meditation because I enjoy it and it really seems to be working for me. (Your mileage may vary, of course).

Best wishes for a healthy happy 2017.

@kanaazpereira

Hello @nikki16,
Welcome to Connect; we are so happy to have you!

There are so many wonderful members here, who have discussed anxiety and the many ways to deal with it; allow me to introduce you to @nojeanius, @jimhd, @rspaulling, @heatherf316, @quazar, @thinktherapy, @jay_baruch, @missyb57, @mamasitalucita, @twptrustrek, @djabber, @roxie43. I am confident they will have much advice to offer you.

You may also wish to join in on a recent discussion: “Do you use your anxiety in a productive fashion?”
http://mayocl.in/2gwQq5O

@nikki16, can you tell us a little more about the kind of anxiety you experience? What have you tried to not allow these feelings to interfere with your daily life?

Jump to this post

nikki16 night times and winter time as well can be for anyone depressing. I know how you feel about medications and being dependent on them or just how they make you feel. Have you thought about a counselor or support group to discuss any issues that you may have. It is always better to have someone or others to talk to in person as well as on this sight. It may help you with your anxiousness. What do you think?

@coloradogirl

In 2017, I am trying meditation to help change my relationship with anxiety. It doesn’t necessarily make the anxious thoughts go away, but it is slowly changing my relationship to them. I find I am more able to observe the anxious thought and not get caught up in it. That helps reduce the physiological reactions, which dampens the cycle of anxious thought => physical reaction => more anxious thoughts (and so on).

If you are interested in exploring this, I’ve found a book that might be helpful. It’s called The Mindful Way Through Anxiety by Susan Orsillo and Lizabeth Roemer. Both have PhD’s in Psychology so they are well-qualified to write on the subject. There is also a book on the Mindful Way Through Depression with different authors. I’ve read both and found both helpful. I second the comments of others about counseling. I’ve done that in the past too and it was helpful, but I like the idea of meditation because I enjoy it and it really seems to be working for me. (Your mileage may vary, of course).

Best wishes for a healthy happy 2017.

Jump to this post

What a great resolution for 2017, @coloradogirl! Good for you.
There’s a new Page and blog on Connect dedicated to Health & Mindfulness. You may wish to follow the page to get blog updates. Consider it a little injection of mindfulness as an occasional refresher to the practices you’ve learned from your reading. Simply click the + FOLLOW button on the Mindfulness page here https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/mindfulness-in-health/

So how does this work for you? Do you now see the anxious though more objectively and are therefore able to not get caught up in it? I’d like to learn more.

@coloradogirl

In 2017, I am trying meditation to help change my relationship with anxiety. It doesn’t necessarily make the anxious thoughts go away, but it is slowly changing my relationship to them. I find I am more able to observe the anxious thought and not get caught up in it. That helps reduce the physiological reactions, which dampens the cycle of anxious thought => physical reaction => more anxious thoughts (and so on).

If you are interested in exploring this, I’ve found a book that might be helpful. It’s called The Mindful Way Through Anxiety by Susan Orsillo and Lizabeth Roemer. Both have PhD’s in Psychology so they are well-qualified to write on the subject. There is also a book on the Mindful Way Through Depression with different authors. I’ve read both and found both helpful. I second the comments of others about counseling. I’ve done that in the past too and it was helpful, but I like the idea of meditation because I enjoy it and it really seems to be working for me. (Your mileage may vary, of course).

Best wishes for a healthy happy 2017.

Jump to this post

This is great, thank you for sharing the link.

To answer your question, I use a free app called Insight Timer that has guided meditations, some of which are specific to anxiety. That has been very helpful and the support of the community within the app has been helpful too.

What seems to be happening is that I’m more able to notice the anxious thoughts and acknowledge them without getting caught up in them. (One of my fellow meditators in the app community uses the phrase “I see you there,” which I thought captured the sentiment very well).

For a long time I thought that something was wrong with me because I have anxious thoughts. Now I realize that they are a normal part of the brain trying to protect us, but it’s the response we make to them that can be harmful. Getting too caught up in them can cause a cycle of anxious thought => physiological reaction => more anxious thoughts (etc.) With meditation training, I can simply acknowledge the thought and watch it go by rather than getting caught up in it. For many years, I was a “ruminator” in that I sort of stewed in whatever negative thought came along, because I thought that was what you were supposed to do. Now, I’m realizing that I have thoughts, but I am not my thoughts, and I don’t have to engage with or take seriously every thought that comes by. It’s been very freeing and has improved both my anxiety and depression.

Thanks for asking. I wish I had found this 30 years ago. 🙂

@coloradogirl

In 2017, I am trying meditation to help change my relationship with anxiety. It doesn’t necessarily make the anxious thoughts go away, but it is slowly changing my relationship to them. I find I am more able to observe the anxious thought and not get caught up in it. That helps reduce the physiological reactions, which dampens the cycle of anxious thought => physical reaction => more anxious thoughts (and so on).

If you are interested in exploring this, I’ve found a book that might be helpful. It’s called The Mindful Way Through Anxiety by Susan Orsillo and Lizabeth Roemer. Both have PhD’s in Psychology so they are well-qualified to write on the subject. There is also a book on the Mindful Way Through Depression with different authors. I’ve read both and found both helpful. I second the comments of others about counseling. I’ve done that in the past too and it was helpful, but I like the idea of meditation because I enjoy it and it really seems to be working for me. (Your mileage may vary, of course).

Best wishes for a healthy happy 2017.

Jump to this post

This makes perfect sense, Coloradogirl. I like the phrase “I see you there.” It helps keep the detachment from the thought. I am going to share this with 2 young people in my circle. They are in their teens and manage their anxiety fairly well, but this sounds like another tool that they can add to their toolbox. Perhaps with this they won’t say later in life “I wish I had found this 30 years ago.” Thank you.

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