Colonoscopy and bronchiectasis

Posted by papillion @papillion, Dec 9, 2019

My doctor said it’s time for colonoscopy. I’m concern about being put out. My friend got pneumonia then sepsis Anyone know about this

Did your friend get pneumonia and sepsis because of anesthesia? I have had bronchiectasis for many years. Due to my family history of colon cancer, I have to undergo colonoscopy every 5 years instead of every 10 years like everybody else. I have not had any problem afterwards. Ask the clinic where your colonoscopy will be performed if they can give you twilight anesthesia, which is much milder than full anesthesia. You will be vaguely aware of your surroundings but won't feel anything physically that is being done to you.

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Papillion, I've had colorectal cancer and, over the years, had probably five colonoscopys. Here's the goofy thing though, my carcinoma was in the lower sigmoid section of the colon. Indeed it was discovered by my primary care doc while performing an :"in-office" sigmoidoscopy. Much later after total recovery the colorectal doc revealed to me that the significant majority of colon cancers occur in the sigmoid section. I asked him "why." He said if he knew he'd be rich. Bottom line. Bolstered by additional reading I've done over the years since, I've become convinced that colonoscopy is a very over prescribed intervention and one might speculate that the decision to choose it over a flexsig is corrupted by the long green ($),

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@thumperguy

Papillion, I've had colorectal cancer and, over the years, had probably five colonoscopys. Here's the goofy thing though, my carcinoma was in the lower sigmoid section of the colon. Indeed it was discovered by my primary care doc while performing an :"in-office" sigmoidoscopy. Much later after total recovery the colorectal doc revealed to me that the significant majority of colon cancers occur in the sigmoid section. I asked him "why." He said if he knew he'd be rich. Bottom line. Bolstered by additional reading I've done over the years since, I've become convinced that colonoscopy is a very over prescribed intervention and one might speculate that the decision to choose it over a flexsig is corrupted by the long green ($),

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Oh Papillion, pertinent to your situation, you can undergo a flex sig without sedation.

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@ling123

Did your friend get pneumonia and sepsis because of anesthesia? I have had bronchiectasis for many years. Due to my family history of colon cancer, I have to undergo colonoscopy every 5 years instead of every 10 years like everybody else. I have not had any problem afterwards. Ask the clinic where your colonoscopy will be performed if they can give you twilight anesthesia, which is much milder than full anesthesia. You will be vaguely aware of your surroundings but won't feel anything physically that is being done to you.

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Thank you

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@thumperguy

Papillion, I've had colorectal cancer and, over the years, had probably five colonoscopys. Here's the goofy thing though, my carcinoma was in the lower sigmoid section of the colon. Indeed it was discovered by my primary care doc while performing an :"in-office" sigmoidoscopy. Much later after total recovery the colorectal doc revealed to me that the significant majority of colon cancers occur in the sigmoid section. I asked him "why." He said if he knew he'd be rich. Bottom line. Bolstered by additional reading I've done over the years since, I've become convinced that colonoscopy is a very over prescribed intervention and one might speculate that the decision to choose it over a flexsig is corrupted by the long green ($),

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@thumperguy I can see that for those with low risk of colon cancer, flexible sigmoidoscopy is probably a good choice. With my family history, though, I would rather go through colonoscopy so the doctor can see the entire colon rather than just the lower portion of it. https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/flexible-sigmoidoscopy/about/pac-20394189

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@ling123

@thumperguy I can see that for those with low risk of colon cancer, flexible sigmoidoscopy is probably a good choice. With my family history, though, I would rather go through colonoscopy so the doctor can see the entire colon rather than just the lower portion of it. https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/flexible-sigmoidoscopy/about/pac-20394189

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Being as free of anxiety as possible going forward is certainly worth plenty and colonoscopy is the gold standard for achieving that. Don

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I had colon cancer and now have colonoscopies every year. Ugh! I was diagnosed with bronchiectasis in 2010 and no one (doctor) has ever mentioned any concern including for the 7 hours I was sedated for colon cancer surgery in 2015. The sedatives used for colonoscopies are similar to the ones used for bronchoscopies and I had one of those last summer. Colonoscopies take little time and you are soon awake.
I ALWAYS remind the anesthesiologist and/or my gastroenterologist, who has performed many many colonoscopies on me, that I have lung diseases and they have always said that they saw that in my records and they have always been reassuring. Colonoscopies are preventive and diagnostic. Please get it done on the schedule recommended by your doctor. No half measures. Get your whole colon looked at.

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@thumperguy

Papillion, I've had colorectal cancer and, over the years, had probably five colonoscopys. Here's the goofy thing though, my carcinoma was in the lower sigmoid section of the colon. Indeed it was discovered by my primary care doc while performing an :"in-office" sigmoidoscopy. Much later after total recovery the colorectal doc revealed to me that the significant majority of colon cancers occur in the sigmoid section. I asked him "why." He said if he knew he'd be rich. Bottom line. Bolstered by additional reading I've done over the years since, I've become convinced that colonoscopy is a very over prescribed intervention and one might speculate that the decision to choose it over a flexsig is corrupted by the long green ($),

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My cancer was in the transverse section which is as high up as possible. Anything other than a full colonoscopy would have missed the tumor completely. I wasn't aware of any symptoms and it wouldn't have been found until a much later stage.
Colonoscopies are preventive (removal of polyps that may turn into cancer) and diagnostic (biopsy of any suspicious cells). Recently the age to start colon cancer screening has been moved up to 45 from 50 due to colon cancer appearing more often now in younger people. If there are no polyps and/or no biopsies, colonoscopies are covered completely by insurance as part of preventive care . Same for mammograms, prostate testing, flu shots etc. under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare,).

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@ling123

@thumperguy I can see that for those with low risk of colon cancer, flexible sigmoidoscopy is probably a good choice. With my family history, though, I would rather go through colonoscopy so the doctor can see the entire colon rather than just the lower portion of it. https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/flexible-sigmoidoscopy/about/pac-20394189

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Yes check the whole colon for sure

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@rits

I had colon cancer and now have colonoscopies every year. Ugh! I was diagnosed with bronchiectasis in 2010 and no one (doctor) has ever mentioned any concern including for the 7 hours I was sedated for colon cancer surgery in 2015. The sedatives used for colonoscopies are similar to the ones used for bronchoscopies and I had one of those last summer. Colonoscopies take little time and you are soon awake.
I ALWAYS remind the anesthesiologist and/or my gastroenterologist, who has performed many many colonoscopies on me, that I have lung diseases and they have always said that they saw that in my records and they have always been reassuring. Colonoscopies are preventive and diagnostic. Please get it done on the schedule recommended by your doctor. No half measures. Get your whole colon looked at.

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Yes I will schedule it for January

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@rits

I had colon cancer and now have colonoscopies every year. Ugh! I was diagnosed with bronchiectasis in 2010 and no one (doctor) has ever mentioned any concern including for the 7 hours I was sedated for colon cancer surgery in 2015. The sedatives used for colonoscopies are similar to the ones used for bronchoscopies and I had one of those last summer. Colonoscopies take little time and you are soon awake.
I ALWAYS remind the anesthesiologist and/or my gastroenterologist, who has performed many many colonoscopies on me, that I have lung diseases and they have always said that they saw that in my records and they have always been reassuring. Colonoscopies are preventive and diagnostic. Please get it done on the schedule recommended by your doctor. No half measures. Get your whole colon looked at.

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Had an upper endoscopy recently and reminded my gastroenterologist of my breathing issues and told the anesthesiologist the same. The experience I had was perfect and I woke up breathing better than I had in a long time. Have no idea what they did to make that happen but I’d like to bottle it!

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@ling123

Did your friend get pneumonia and sepsis because of anesthesia? I have had bronchiectasis for many years. Due to my family history of colon cancer, I have to undergo colonoscopy every 5 years instead of every 10 years like everybody else. I have not had any problem afterwards. Ask the clinic where your colonoscopy will be performed if they can give you twilight anesthesia, which is much milder than full anesthesia. You will be vaguely aware of your surroundings but won't feel anything physically that is being done to you.

Jump to this post

Just a question. How many years have you had it? It is new to me. I just found out. Getting a nebulizer for home and attempting to get a smartvest if insurance approves it. Do you use any of these and if so do they help.

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