Cochlear Implants

Posted by mwbucket @mwbucket, Jun 22, 2016

Considering a cochlear implant. Any info on type to get and/or any needed info to consider???

@adela

FYI about loops. Our library has just installed a Loop in the Board Room. Last night the Board members were told to speak into the mics and keep the mics around 9 inches from their mouths. Well 7 Board members did that, and it was wonderful. Two board members slouched back in their seats and didn't try to make is work. After my anger subsided, I said to one member that he was too far from the mic (about 2-3 feet) and I could not hear what he was saying. He laughed and kept on slouching.

Jump to this post

Hi
Excuser my ignorance….but is Loops???

REPLY

okay, thanks!

REPLY
@michaelstewart

If all goes well, surgery is 1.5-2.5 hr. procedure A small incision behind the ear where a receiver is implanted and electrodes are threaded through to the cochlea. Release from the hospital the following day. Minor discomfort for 2-3 days. Back to normal in 8-10 days. Had cochlear unit fitted in 4-6 weeks. Absolutely amazing the second it was turned on. Remember hearing my wife’s voice for first time in a long while. Because your brain needs to retrain itself to using the new cochlear unit my hearing continued to improve with each new hearing test over 1.5 year span. A game changing decision on my part and an excellent procedure performed by Dr. Driscoll and his staff at Mayo Clinic. Follow up testing and consultation by Amy Olund was second to none.

Jump to this post

I am considering an implant in left ear, which has a hearing aid. My right ear is almost totally dead. Is it true that hearing through the implant is very different than with an aid since it goes directly to the auditory nerve? Does that mean that all of my hearing that was from the aid will be gone? The aid had helped with volume and my lip reading, but discrimination was very poor. Thanks

REPLY
@davekoh

I am considering an implant in left ear, which has a hearing aid. My right ear is almost totally dead. Is it true that hearing through the implant is very different than with an aid since it goes directly to the auditory nerve? Does that mean that all of my hearing that was from the aid will be gone? The aid had helped with volume and my lip reading, but discrimination was very poor. Thanks

Jump to this post

@davekoh ,

The process of hearing is different as the nerves are stimulated rather than amplifying sound like a hearing aid does. That doesn't mean that things will sound different in the long run. They may start off mechanical or like Mickey Mouse, but over time your brain will normalize what things sound like.

Your discrimination ought to be much improved compared to poor discrimination with your current hearing aid, but it may not be instant and may take effort to get there.

Dennis

REPLY
@dstell

@davekoh ,

The process of hearing is different as the nerves are stimulated rather than amplifying sound like a hearing aid does. That doesn't mean that things will sound different in the long run. They may start off mechanical or like Mickey Mouse, but over time your brain will normalize what things sound like.

Your discrimination ought to be much improved compared to poor discrimination with your current hearing aid, but it may not be instant and may take effort to get there.

Dennis

Jump to this post

Davekoh, everyone's hearing loss is different and cochlear implants are directly impacted by those differences. One size doesn't apply here. My hearing from my CI 27 months ago is somewhat improved but not at "stand-alone" hearing stage.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Hi @lizzy102, I'm just catching up with your message now. I'm shocked that closed captioning is not included in this Mayo Clinic Radio episode. it is dated from 2017, which may predate the closed captioning option on YouTube. Here is another video with Dr. Matthew Carlson, ENT surgeon at Mayo Clinic, talking about Cochlear Implants. This version INCLUDES closed captioning.

Jump to this post

Thank you so much, Colleen! I appreciate the video. I have held off CI surgery long enough. I’m going to hustle and figure out the best surgery & rehab center for me and dive in to the evaluation process. I’m lucky, we have an RV so I can go to the best Center (that I can find) and stay nearby for as long as it takes.
If you or anyone else would share information of finding a great team to work with, I would sure appreciate it!
Best, Lizzy

REPLY
@davekoh

I am considering an implant in left ear, which has a hearing aid. My right ear is almost totally dead. Is it true that hearing through the implant is very different than with an aid since it goes directly to the auditory nerve? Does that mean that all of my hearing that was from the aid will be gone? The aid had helped with volume and my lip reading, but discrimination was very poor. Thanks

Jump to this post

I was like you; using a hearing aid on one side, and the other side was nearly deaf. I had been fit with only one aid years before, when I probably should have been fitted with two. Consequently, that unaided ear had sensory deprivation. In 2005 I decided to go for a CI. I was qualified. The medical team suggested doing the aided ear, rather than the ear with sensory deprivation. I was unwilling to lose what I already had, but was willing to take the chance on the poorer ear. That's what I did. Today, nearly 15 years later, I am still bimodal with a CI and a HA. They work well together. That poorer ear has done remarkably well with the CI. I will say that someone from HLAA suggested a few years prior to my CI surgery, that I try using a headset with an audio device on the poorer ear, and to use it in a rehabilitation effort. I did that for 2 years; listening to music, audio tapes, etc. I found that I could not hear speech well without total concentration, but I could enjoy music in a quiet setting. It was a bit like training the ear to hear again even though it never came close to giving me what I was getting with the aided ear. So, long story short. I'm glad I had the CI done on the poorer ear. I'm glad I still am able to use the HA. I know the hearing acuity on that HA ear has become a lot worse and probably qualifies for a CI now, but I'm still scoring high in testing with both technologies, so have put that off. The CI has been nothing short of a miracle for me. I'm very thankful. PS: The add on devices that come with the Cochlear products are incredible. I use the Mini Mic 2+ in most social settings where there is background noise. I hear quite well on the cell phone so don't use the phone clip. Life is good
!

REPLY

Thank you so much for the reply. My situation is so much like yours. My loss was caused by otosclerosis, which may complicate things. So I will begin the evaluation process soon.

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.