chronic confusion

Posted by bucslife @bucslife, Dec 26, 2022

I was told back in 2014 that I had COPD and that I had the lung capacity of a 73 year old. This was through a county program for people whom are homeless or indigent. It's the only diagnosis I've had and I'm not on any medication other than some kind of asthma Inhaler which I rarely use. I've been suffering from panic attacks since just before finding out and now the attacks are daily and sometimes several a day. I now (finally) have insurance with Florida Blue and tomorrow I have an appointment with their Be Well program and believe I'll be talking to a psychiatrist. I am afraid that I will be told that the attacks are all in my head. My concern is that my body is causing them and not my mind. My breathing is not great but it doesn't stop me from leading an active lifestyle although it seems as if I'm getting winded easier. If the attacks are caused by my COPD (or some other physicality) how can I prove this. I honestly want some type of medication that is time released or can stop them instantly like some type of Xanax or something. The only thing I really worry about is my health and my football team losing. Overall I'm pretty content so it's hard for me to fathom my mind is causing them all. I would appreciate any suggestions. Thank you for listening, I'm so incredibly grateful I found this forum today.
sincerely,
Jerry

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Hi, bucslife. So glad you got your insurance! I've had panic attacks since I was about 11 years old. Nasty things, they are. One thing I've learned that works well for me is when I have one, to get up walk. Just a few steps usually stops it. I learned that from a doctor. He said that if you stay still, the panic just grows and freezes you. Try walking, and see if that helps.

As far as medication, I took Xanax decades ago. Now I take Lorazepam. They're 1mg tablets. I usually break them in half. Takes about 20 minutes for it to work.

I have COPD, too. It definitely can cause panic attacks and anxiety. It's the shortness of breath that does it, so please use your inhaler. I use Symbicort 2 puffs morning and 2 puffs at night.

From what I understand, the treatment for anxiety from COPD is the same as any other cause. Anxiety meds like Xanax or Lorazepam, and finding a trick like the walking trick. A friend told me her trick is to get up and make a cup of tea. Walking to the kitchen and concentrating on making the tea stops the panic attack. I use that too.

Best wishes to you,
Cookie

REPLY

@bucslife Hi Jerry – I am glad to hear you are finally getting insurance coverage! It will help you find the care you need. I do second @cookierockwell suggestion that you get on and stay on a specific COPD inhaler.
I have asthma and bronchiectasis, but not COPD and it has taken me from easily winded and fatigued to almost normal… Symbicort is now the "standard of care" for long-term asthma and COPD. It used to be very expensive, so many docs would just go with an asthma inhaler. BUT there is now a generic version (mines costs $5 month on Medicare) – and I cannot tell you how much better it makes my breathing – 2 puffs, twice a day, with a midday booster if I need.
Being short of breath really does bring on anxiety, it is definitely not "all in your head" – it is a protective response by your body, telling you to get help.
Do you have an initial appointment yet?
Sue

REPLY
@cookierockwell

Hi, bucslife. So glad you got your insurance! I've had panic attacks since I was about 11 years old. Nasty things, they are. One thing I've learned that works well for me is when I have one, to get up walk. Just a few steps usually stops it. I learned that from a doctor. He said that if you stay still, the panic just grows and freezes you. Try walking, and see if that helps.

As far as medication, I took Xanax decades ago. Now I take Lorazepam. They're 1mg tablets. I usually break them in half. Takes about 20 minutes for it to work.

I have COPD, too. It definitely can cause panic attacks and anxiety. It's the shortness of breath that does it, so please use your inhaler. I use Symbicort 2 puffs morning and 2 puffs at night.

From what I understand, the treatment for anxiety from COPD is the same as any other cause. Anxiety meds like Xanax or Lorazepam, and finding a trick like the walking trick. A friend told me her trick is to get up and make a cup of tea. Walking to the kitchen and concentrating on making the tea stops the panic attack. I use that too.

Best wishes to you,
Cookie

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Thank you so much 😊

REPLY
@sueinmn

@bucslife Hi Jerry – I am glad to hear you are finally getting insurance coverage! It will help you find the care you need. I do second @cookierockwell suggestion that you get on and stay on a specific COPD inhaler.
I have asthma and bronchiectasis, but not COPD and it has taken me from easily winded and fatigued to almost normal… Symbicort is now the "standard of care" for long-term asthma and COPD. It used to be very expensive, so many docs would just go with an asthma inhaler. BUT there is now a generic version (mines costs $5 month on Medicare) – and I cannot tell you how much better it makes my breathing – 2 puffs, twice a day, with a midday booster if I need.
Being short of breath really does bring on anxiety, it is definitely not "all in your head" – it is a protective response by your body, telling you to get help.
Do you have an initial appointment yet?
Sue

Jump to this post

Thank you very much 💙

REPLY
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