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mmurphy_43
@mmurphy_43

Posts: 5
Joined: Nov 09, 2016

Chest tightness even after stents

Posted by @mmurphy_43, Nov 9, 2016

I had 4 stents placed in my heart….2 in November of 2014 and the other 2 in December. The day I left the hospital after the last 2 stents were placed, the physician’s nurse asked me how and I was feeling. I replied, “I still feel the tightness that I felt before.” She said that I would just have to get used to it because if it wasn’t better it wouldn’t get any better. Anxiety has about killed me. My doctor offered another heart cath to put my mind at ease but I bled terrible after both previous caths and didn’t want to risk another. A year later I did another stress test that showed all problems that were present before the stents were no longer there. The cardiologist feels that all is well. Has anyone else experienced this?

REPLY

I have the same thing, and it’s been going on for a year now. I actually called 911 recently and was hospitalized because i swore i was having another heart attack, although this proved to be false. In talking later to my doctor, he said i have to learn to differenciate symptomolgy, which supposedly comes with time. His suggestion to me was to be seriously concerned if i have symptoms equal to, or greater than, what i had during my initial heart attack, and to go into emergency mode if this happens. Otherwise, it is probably “normal” discomfort that should diminish with more time.

They found my blockages before a heart attack so I was lucky. Hopefully yours will diminish sooner than mine has. I have even been to Mayo Clinic and had a Upper GI work up to try to find something there but everything was ok.

Welcome to Connect, @mmurphy_43 and @mthomasb. I can understand how this discomfort is unsettling and appreciate how difficult it must be to differentiate between the “new normal” discomfort and symptoms that require medical attention. I wonder if @thankful or @predictable might have something to add to this conversation?

MMurphy, how are you managing your anxiety? MThomas, are you able to differentiate the symptoms, and be more comfortable with the new normal?

I have talked to a counselor and do a lot of praying. My local physician also gave me a script for Xanax but only take it if extremely bad. I know the side effects of Xanax and refuse to take it.

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect, @mmurphy_43 and @mthomasb. I can understand how this discomfort is unsettling and appreciate how difficult it must be to differentiate between the “new normal” discomfort and symptoms that require medical attention. I wonder if @thankful or @predictable might have something to add to this conversation?

MMurphy, how are you managing your anxiety? MThomas, are you able to differentiate the symptoms, and be more comfortable with the new normal?

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not really. my $5000 false alarm happened just a couple of months ago. its very dofficult – i don’t like to spend that kind of money needlessly, but don’t really want to take a chance on dying. i carry nitro at all times. i was told that if it DOESN’T work, it’s probably not a heart issue. unfortunately, i was told this in the hospital after alteady being brought in. its a difficult thing to those who experience it, and heart specialists really don’t seem to be able to help with this much.

@mmurphy_43

They found my blockages before a heart attack so I was lucky. Hopefully yours will diminish sooner than mine has. I have even been to Mayo Clinic and had a Upper GI work up to try to find something there but everything was ok.

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i received three stents as the result of my attack. i was given an angiogram two years earlier and told i had insignificant blockage for my age (no spot greater than 30% blockage). at the time of my heart attack, one artery was 100% blocked, and another had blockages of 70 and 50% (in the same artery). i was only 61, not overweight, and had quit smoking several years before. the primary culprit was probably stress, so you need to do whatever helps with this, even if its a med you don’t like, such as xanax.

@mmurphy_43 and @mthomasb. Thanks for sharing your stories. Back in May of 14 after my usual workout I found myself experiencing chest pain that I never felt before. I just knew that I must be having a HA even though I don’t have any history in my family. The pain was extreme and rather then call an ambulance, I had my wife drive me to the hospital (not a good idea in retrospect). It was a tense ride but I felt great to be there finally. I was not showing any signs from the tests they were performing, but they could really see the pain I was experiencing. Finally they brought in a Ultrasound Tech to preform an Echo cardiogram. About halfway through this test the Tech left the room and returned with the Cardiologist. Things progressed very quickly at that point and soon I was being prepped for the Cath lab. I received a single stent in my LAD for a 100% blockage which they called the “Widow Maker”. I was extremely fortunate to be alive I was told and unfortunately I was left with an EF (Ejection Fraction) of 35%. Well about 3 weeks later I was involved with Cardio Rehab at the hospital and I really enjoyed this more than I thought I would because I was realizing already that although I was told everything worked out great, I had a strong fear of the slightest pain that I would have and yet the Tech’s in the rehab lab offered me the peace of mind that I was being monitored and after several weeks, it became less & less of an issue.
For many years prior to this I have had Panic Attacks and anxiety that plagued me and I have been on 1.0 mg of Klonopin a day (I was also given Xanax, but did not like taking this at all). I believe perhaps more than women, men struggle with the physiological effects of having a HA feeling that we didn’t do enough and go hard on ourselves with some of the lifestyle changes that we should have made years ago. We are really good at beating ourselves up! I firmly believe in prayer and am convinced that it was not my time and as I am turning 65 in January and easing into retirement I am committed to giving back. I hope to be able to volunteer and be encouraging to the folks I am around. In ending, I think it would be nuts to not be affected by these little pains that can really spook us and we just got to get to the point to trust in our Cardiologist and hopefully the changes we have made in our lifestyle. God bless both of you men. Be Thankful! @thankful.

Yes, your situation sounds very similar. My one-year anniversary of the event is tomorrow, and i am just starting to operate on a less fearful basis. I guess we just have to follow our health plans, continue with our lives, appreciate every day, and hope for the best.

@mthomasb

Yes, your situation sounds very similar. My one-year anniversary of the event is tomorrow, and i am just starting to operate on a less fearful basis. I guess we just have to follow our health plans, continue with our lives, appreciate every day, and hope for the best.

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@mthomasb– I couldn’t have said it better! I also would encourage to do as much research on what we’ve got to deal with in a very proactive way. I’ve spent a bunch of time looking not only at the few drugs that I will probably be taking the rest of my life, but also there are several supplements that I have learned will be helpful for me to take. My cardiologist things most of this produces expensive pee, but I disagree. Each of us has to find what seems to help us (but do no harm) and even if we feel better about ourselves because this, it will give us a better sense of self. We’ve been through something that was very traumatic and we have to do what helps us deal with our current situation. Live everyday to its fullest because we never have any guarantees what tomorrow has in store. Be thankful! @thankful.

Liked by Don Gilmore

My husband is 61 and for a number of years taken statin drugs for high cholesterol. Statins have worked very well and his numbers stay in normal range. His family has a long history of heart problems and therefore we’re watchful for possible symptoms indicating a heart issue. Over a year ago he started to sometimes experience shortness of breath while working, climbing stairs, etc. He is a former smoker, but quit and hasn’t smoked in almost 30 years. He saw his doctor and had lab, stress test, and an assortment of other tests that didn’t show any abnormalities. Now a year later, he just had his yearly physical and routine tests, and again, all came back normal, but still having breathless episodes. Worrisome, and thinking we need to find a doctor that specializes in heart issues. Our question: we want to make an appointment, what type of specialist should he see? Would appreciate if anyone has some suggestions for us.

Sounds like they’re missing something. I had a 33 yr old kid in rehab with me who told me he had to convince his cardiologist that he had heart issues – he ended up having a SETUPLET bypass. I would look for a good heart guy or pulmonologist.

@mthomasb

Yes, your situation sounds very similar. My one-year anniversary of the event is tomorrow, and i am just starting to operate on a less fearful basis. I guess we just have to follow our health plans, continue with our lives, appreciate every day, and hope for the best.

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Thanks so much for the advice.

@mthomasb

Yes, your situation sounds very similar. My one-year anniversary of the event is tomorrow, and i am just starting to operate on a less fearful basis. I guess we just have to follow our health plans, continue with our lives, appreciate every day, and hope for the best.

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What type of supplements are you taking, if I may ask?

@mthomasb

Yes, your situation sounds very similar. My one-year anniversary of the event is tomorrow, and i am just starting to operate on a less fearful basis. I guess we just have to follow our health plans, continue with our lives, appreciate every day, and hope for the best.

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For prescribed meds, i currently only take metropolol and lipitor. In addition to this, i take probiotics, c10q, fish oil, and vitamins b (compound), d, and e. Stay away from l-arginine – its been found to actually exacerbate heart problems.

@mthomasb

Yes, your situation sounds very similar. My one-year anniversary of the event is tomorrow, and i am just starting to operate on a less fearful basis. I guess we just have to follow our health plans, continue with our lives, appreciate every day, and hope for the best.

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No problem. Also, the vitamins i mentioned are in addition to a good, general multi-vitamin.

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