Chest pain / pressure

Posted by jacksfather1 @jacksfather1, Dec 20, 2020

Hello,
For almost 8 months ive been having chest pressure/pain and im at my wits end. 2 different pulminologists have said my lungs are fine. Ive been to er at least 6 or 7 times ecg and bloodwark always fine. Ive been to a cardiologist and have done echocardiogram and stress test, i could only do 3 mins of stress test because of the shortness of breath but cardiologist said my heart was fine. Ive scheduled another cardiologist appointment but it wont be till january sometime. With my daily symptoms i should be calling 911 constantly but im embarrased. Im terrified i have narrowed or block arteries and im enraged they wont take the situation more serious. Its ruining my life . Sorry for the rant just wondering if anyone ever had a simillar situation, thanks

@jacksfather1

What does ha stand for?

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@jacksfather1– HA stands for Heart Attack. Sorry! Jim@thankful

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@harryhuse

Hi i have been experiencing chest pains for the last 3 weeks now. It comes and goes as a stabbing chest pain in both sides of chest but most often left side. I also get the pain down my left arm sometimes. Each time i get these pains it lasts for around 5-10 Mins. I went to my GP who referred me to the hospital were they took an ECG, Blood test and measured my blood pressure however it came back all completely normal so they sent me home. 1 and a half week later I still have these pains. Should i be worried or will pass in a week or so?
Please Reply with advise

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H A ????

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@thankful

@jacksfather1– HA stands for Heart Attack. Sorry! Jim@thankful

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Oh I'm very sorry to hear that. I hope you have made a healthy recovery. Both my Grandad and Dad have had heart attacks. My Grandads was due to an unhealthy lifestyle but my Dad is and was very healthy but he had it due to stress.
I am still a teenager and am quite healthy. I'm not sure what could be causing a heart attack.
Thanks

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@harryhuse

Hi thanks for your message
I am not quite sure what a HA was

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@harryhuse– HA stands for Heart Attack. Sorry! Jim@thankful

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In reply to @dianrib "H A ????" + (show)
@dianrib

Thanks 👍 covid, isolation depression sickness it all sucks

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@harryhuse

Oh I'm very sorry to hear that. I hope you have made a healthy recovery. Both my Grandad and Dad have had heart attacks. My Grandads was due to an unhealthy lifestyle but my Dad is and was very healthy but he had it due to stress.
I am still a teenager and am quite healthy. I'm not sure what could be causing a heart attack.
Thanks

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Sorry I deleted the actual post I should of responded to so I will put this out there. A month ago my dad without telling anybody had chest pains and pains in both arms at seperate times for 3 weeks well middle of night he could not catch his breath and finally got scared enough to call 911 and go to hospital, after all the tests were run everything came back negative, then somebody made decision to put dye in his blood and look for a blockage and sure enough 1 artery was about 60 percent plugged and so they decided to put a stint in, next day no pains and was up walking around. The doctor said he never had a HA but that artery was telling his body there was a problem and he was well on his way to a HA good luck dave

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@davej

Sorry I deleted the actual post I should of responded to so I will put this out there. A month ago my dad without telling anybody had chest pains and pains in both arms at seperate times for 3 weeks well middle of night he could not catch his breath and finally got scared enough to call 911 and go to hospital, after all the tests were run everything came back negative, then somebody made decision to put dye in his blood and look for a blockage and sure enough 1 artery was about 60 percent plugged and so they decided to put a stint in, next day no pains and was up walking around. The doctor said he never had a HA but that artery was telling his body there was a problem and he was well on his way to a HA good luck dave

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Hi,
I'm just not sure what would cause a blocked artery in my body but I am going back to the hospital for further checks so hopefully they will find what every it is. Perhaps its only a 10-50% blockage. I read how they only treat on patients with this when they have a 60% blockage and anything under should take medication. Nobody really takes it seriously as they all think it will go in a couple of days and they dont know that something bad could be happening so its really hard to appointments at the hospital with my family.

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Did the cardiologist bring up the option to do a Transesophageal echocardiogram? I ask because research I’ve done showed me that when a normal echocardiogram doesn’t yield any abnormal results sometimes Doctors will resort to this more invasive test as it is able to get better images of the actual heart valves from inside of the esophagus in order to rule out issues with the valves themselves. It is said that this particular test can capture images and insight that all the other tests may not be able to capture, such as blood tests, blood culture, ECG/EKG, echocardiogram, chest X-ray, and CT of chest.

I’ve happened to have all of the above tests performed on various occasions recently except the TEE test (transesophageal echocardiogram) without seeing a cardiologist and all came back normal. My situation has been shortness of breath that got worse after an aspiration event. However, I already had the shortness of breath for a little while before the aspiration (not from Covid) so I may pursue a TEE myself from a cardiologist if necessary. My hope is that it could be done at the same time as a bronchoscopy since both procedures put a tub down the throat (I believe cardiologist performs the TEE while a pulmonologist performs the bronchoscopey). However, it would be great if one specialist was able to conduct both at the same time.

The transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) test:
During this test, a small transducer attached to the end of a tube (for sonography imaging) is inserted down the tube leading from your mouth to your stomach (esophagus). This test provides much more detailed pictures of your heart than is possible with a transthoracic echocardiogram.

Bronchoscopy:
During bronchoscopy, a thin tube (bronchoscope) is passed through your nose or mouth, down your throat and into your lungs. During the procedure the Doctor usually performs a lavage (releases saline water into the lungs and sucks it back up), or other tests such as these:

Special devices may be passed through the bronchoscope, such as a tool to obtain a biopsy, an electrocautery probe to control bleeding or a laser to reduce the size of an airway tumor. Special techniques are used to guide the collection of biopsies to ensure the desired area of the lung is sampled.

A bronchoscope with a built-in ultrasound probe may be used to check the lymph nodes in the chest for people suspected to have lung cancer.

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I dont know about my father but I had one done on aug 2020 to look at bicuspid valve and the severity of aeortic stensos

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@davej

I dont know about my father but I had one done on aug 2020 to look at bicuspid valve and the severity of aeortic stensos

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Thanks for the feedback. Did they put you to sleep for the procedure or were you just sedated?

How was the procedure overall if just sedated? What kind of results did you get back?

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Just sedated and the results were more conclusive on the diagnosis. The results limited my choices for surgery better to know now that when the surgery was going on I guess.

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@davej It is interesting how much can be seen on a good EKG, TEE or not, with just a little help. My best diag for Cardiac AGEL (Gelsolin) comes from looking at the top left quadrant of a 12-lead EKG, comparing the aVL and aVR sections, the QT segments and other voltages in the area. I first pointed out the low voltages and stumbling pumping action, long QT to my cardiologist about 15 years ago. She said it was nothing to be concerned about. Now, with the help of Mayo, NIH and others, I know what it means. Inhibited beat and rest, beat and rest, a strong sign of cardiac amyloidosis, especially Gelsolin.

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