Can Neuropathy be cured?

Posted by catstx @catstx, Sep 8, 2021

I’ve had P. neuropathy for 30 years. Just recently I’ve better controlled my blood sugar. So, I’m wondering if Neuropathy ever goes away, Or, if once the nerves are dead they’re just dead

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Neuropathy group.

Nope, there is absolutely no cure currently for peripheral neuropathy or in research

REPLY
@johnbishop

@catstx, Like most members on Connect I have no medical background or training but everything I've read says there is no cure for neuropathy. That said, I think it really depends on the cause of your neuropathy. I've had idiopathic small fiber peripheral neuropathy for close to 30 years myself and while my feet feel a little better than they did a few years ago, I think it's due to more than just the supplements I take. It's also dependent on staying hydrated, eating healthy and getting some sort of exercise in your daily schedule. The best thing you can do is learn as much as you can about your specific type of neuropathy and most likely cause and work from there on what makes your symptoms better. Here's a little background information.

"Is there any hope for neuropathy? — No medical treatments exist that can cure inherited peripheral neuropathy. However, there are therapies for many other forms. Mar 27, 2019" — Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Peripheral-Neuropathy-Information-Page

— Neuropathy Commons: https://neuropathycommons.org/
— Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy: https://www.foundationforpn.org/

You might find the following discussion helpful:
— Member Neuropathy Journey Stories: What's Yours?: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/member-neuoropathy-journey-stories-whats-yours/

Jump to this post

No MD has ever said I have neuropathy (peripheral). When I talked to my internist about how going barefoot doesn't feel good, she explained that the fat in your soles leaves and so I don't have "cushions" anymore and that it is not uncommon with older people. That's the extent of dialogue I've had with an MD about my symptoms. If I want to talk more with a doctor about what I have, is there any particular type of MD e.g. neurologist, that would seem appropriate? Perhaps it was at Mayo that I recently read that you can get injections of fat in your feet to feel better there. Know anything about that?

REPLY
@artscaping

Good evening Nancy, @banksnc49, Hi there. Yes, you did not see neuropathy listed because it is not been blessed by the appropriate officials. However, it is blessed by folks with neuropathy far beyond any other PT program. That is why it is called a treatment. I began MFR 5 or so years ago right after my diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy. I am not one to get excited about treatments like this but I totally trusted the therapist who recommended it. I had known her for at least 15 years and appreciated her bringing her new MFR skills to my attention.

When I was living in both MN and CA, she found an MFR therapist for me here in MN. In part, because of her, I moved to MN lock, stock, and barrel. As you may know, neuropathy is a progressive condition. Last year, I began receiving MFR twice a week. I already know that sometime soon in my future, another session every week will be necessary.

Sometimes as she continues to release fascia restrictions throughout my body, I worry about folks who post on Connect about the neuropathic pain they cope with every day. MFR is the only answer for me to be able to live a somewhat normal life. Sometimes the restriction release can be momentarily painful. And then the "Ahhhh" happens and it is gone. Sometimes I don't feel the full benefit of an MFR treatment until the next day. And then again there is the "Ahhhh". Right now they are working on the after-surgery pain from a recent total knee replacement. My PT at the orthopedic center, when noting the discomfort said, "I think your MFR therapist can help you get rid of the pain you are having today in your knee". I went there right away and today I have absolutely no knee pain.

So MFR is not just for neuropathy. Chronic pain, surgical pain, accident pain. Any situation that causes the fascia to become layered and restricted will benefit from this type of therapy.

Where do you need help the most?

May you be free of suffering and the causes of suffering.
Chris

Jump to this post

What does MFR stand for?

REPLY
@barbb

No MD has ever said I have neuropathy (peripheral). When I talked to my internist about how going barefoot doesn't feel good, she explained that the fat in your soles leaves and so I don't have "cushions" anymore and that it is not uncommon with older people. That's the extent of dialogue I've had with an MD about my symptoms. If I want to talk more with a doctor about what I have, is there any particular type of MD e.g. neurologist, that would seem appropriate? Perhaps it was at Mayo that I recently read that you can get injections of fat in your feet to feel better there. Know anything about that?

Jump to this post

@barbb – A neurologist is normally the type of doctor to diagnose neuropathy. Have you seen a podiatrist about the symptoms in your feet? I have not heard of fat injections to make the feet feel better but hopefully other members can chime in with their experience.

MFR is Myofascial Release Therapy. There is a discussion on the topic — Myofascial Release Therapy (MFR) for treating compression and pain: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/myofascial-release-therapy-mfr-for-treating-compression-and-pain/

REPLY

The injection that I have tried is called Platelets Rich Plasma (PRP). It was not done by Mayo but a private clinic in Colorado. Unfortunately it didn't do any good

REPLY
@artscaping

Good evening Nancy, @banksnc49, Hi there. Yes, you did not see neuropathy listed because it is not been blessed by the appropriate officials. However, it is blessed by folks with neuropathy far beyond any other PT program. That is why it is called a treatment. I began MFR 5 or so years ago right after my diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy. I am not one to get excited about treatments like this but I totally trusted the therapist who recommended it. I had known her for at least 15 years and appreciated her bringing her new MFR skills to my attention.

When I was living in both MN and CA, she found an MFR therapist for me here in MN. In part, because of her, I moved to MN lock, stock, and barrel. As you may know, neuropathy is a progressive condition. Last year, I began receiving MFR twice a week. I already know that sometime soon in my future, another session every week will be necessary.

Sometimes as she continues to release fascia restrictions throughout my body, I worry about folks who post on Connect about the neuropathic pain they cope with every day. MFR is the only answer for me to be able to live a somewhat normal life. Sometimes the restriction release can be momentarily painful. And then the "Ahhhh" happens and it is gone. Sometimes I don't feel the full benefit of an MFR treatment until the next day. And then again there is the "Ahhhh". Right now they are working on the after-surgery pain from a recent total knee replacement. My PT at the orthopedic center, when noting the discomfort said, "I think your MFR therapist can help you get rid of the pain you are having today in your knee". I went there right away and today I have absolutely no knee pain.

So MFR is not just for neuropathy. Chronic pain, surgical pain, accident pain. Any situation that causes the fascia to become layered and restricted will benefit from this type of therapy.

Where do you need help the most?

May you be free of suffering and the causes of suffering.
Chris

Jump to this post

Thanks for your suggestion. I just emailed the PT that I have been going to and asked if he could either do this technique or recommend someone who does. I actually think he has used it before with me but I didn't know it was called that.

REPLY
@barbb

What does MFR stand for?

Jump to this post

Good afternoon @barbb, MFR stands for Myofascial Release. The fascia is a material that connects all of the bones and muscles in our bodies. In fact, ligaments are made of fascia. When the fascia layers up and becomes restricted there is pain and discomfort that can prevent movement. A therapist, trained in MFR can find and release the restricted areas thereby eliminating the pain. To be sure you are working with an expert MFR therapist look for one who has been taught by James Barnes. http://www.myofascialreleasel.com.

May you be free, safe, and protected from inner and outer harm.
Chris

REPLY
@bonniethompson1234

The only thing that really helped me was a steroid shot I got for my knee. I helped my whole body. I was mostly without pain for two months and it started to come back slowly but had two more months of tolerable pain. It’s back and draining once again.

Jump to this post

Good afternoon. The cortisone shots do the same thing for me…..give me a vacation from my small fiber neuropathy pain. It is not recommended that you have more than 3 of those a year. I get them for a hip problem that has been around for years. I am trying to keep it tolerable.

May you have peace and contentment.
Chris

REPLY

Thanks for your reply, Chris. I was only told I had peripheral neuropathy as a result of a bad case of shingles in my sciatic nerve. This site has made me aware of the term small fiber neuropathy. As I have so much pain throughout my body and had a very bad experience with knee surgery in my right knee, I’m wondering how to go about defining what I actually have. But I will find out. After my cataract surgery which is next on the agenda. Best always, Chris! Bonnie

REPLY
@lisette43

Thanks for your suggestion. I just emailed the PT that I have been going to and asked if he could either do this technique or recommend someone who does. I actually think he has used it before with me but I didn't know it was called that.

Jump to this post

Hello and welcome, @lisette43. I see you found a suggestion from @artscaping's post that you feel you may benefit from with your PT.

Will you share what you learn?

REPLY
@barbb

No MD has ever said I have neuropathy (peripheral). When I talked to my internist about how going barefoot doesn't feel good, she explained that the fat in your soles leaves and so I don't have "cushions" anymore and that it is not uncommon with older people. That's the extent of dialogue I've had with an MD about my symptoms. If I want to talk more with a doctor about what I have, is there any particular type of MD e.g. neurologist, that would seem appropriate? Perhaps it was at Mayo that I recently read that you can get injections of fat in your feet to feel better there. Know anything about that?

Jump to this post

Go to either a podiatrist or a neurologist and ask to be tested for small fiber neuropathy. If you don't ask they will not mention it. It took me 2 years to get diagnosed. Meanwhile symptoms progressed. It starts in the feet.

REPLY

There is a San Diego Biotech Co. (WinSanTor) conducting trials in Canada on a "Cure" using a topical Pirenzepine based formula. Claimed that Pirenzepine causes peripheral nerves to regenerate if damaged. This if it works, is a cure although it is time sensitive as you must have nerves that are not totally destroyed for Pirenzepine to work. So…there is Hope.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment