Burning Mouth Syndrome. I have it very severe.

Posted by mygrigio @mygrigio, Aug 5, 2011

I am a 76 year old women and have had this condition for almost a year. it is getting worse everyday. been to many doctors and not one of them has heard otf it, I am getting desperate

As a long-term clonazepam user who is suffering the prolonged and intense agony of withdrawal from this medication after it was no longer effective, I’m compelled to advise caution in considering its use for more than a week or two. Please access “Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Syndrome” in Wikipedia and the “BenzoBuddies” online forum for further information.

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Hi, @cperaino. Welcome to Connect. How long have you had burning mouth syndrome? How are you managing the symptoms of the condition as you taper off clonazepam?

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Actually, I don’t know whether or not I have burning mouth syndrome. I accessed this site because for the past 3 months I have been experiencing a constant very unpleasant taste in my mouth coupled with some burning, though not at the level described by others in the group. Perhaps it’s part of the benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome, since I have recently found that others on the BenzoBuddies site have described similar symptoms. My prior post was prompted by a concern that those of you who are resorting to the use of Klonopin for relief from the trials of burning mouth syndrome may be letting yourselves in for a much worse situation down the road. I was on Klonopin (2.5mg/day) as prescribed for more than 25 years and tapered off over the period of about a year after realizing that numerous mysterious symptoms that I had been experiencing over several year were a consequence of tolerance withdrawal. The symptoms (agitation, insomnia, panic, dizziness, burning skin, head pressure, cognitive fogginess, air hunger, nerve pain, headaches, feelings of despair upon waking) worsened during the taper and have persisted for the 10 months that I have been completely off the drug, with a faint indication that their severity is slightly diminishing. Given my age (82), the glacial pace of recovery (reflecting the gradual restoration of down-regulated synaptic GABA receptors) leaves little cause for celebration. In any case, on the basis of my experience as well as those of may thousands of benzo users (see BenzoBuddies) I was motivated to warn you against the possibility of adding immeasurably to your suffering by going down the benzo route. In my opinion, as well as that of myriads of current and former benzo users, these drugs should be outlawed.

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@adkhs3333

Thank you so much for the input! Excellent idea about the toothpaste… I will do that immediately. We are in a Rehab Center (due to hubby’s nutrition being severely impacted by a swollen, painful tongue) and they do have him on Magic Mouthwash… and I think it does help. As to the oral surgeon… we did go to one and he said he doesn’t treat TMJ or BMS … then referred us to another dentist that bills himself as a “maxillofacial pain pathologist” … very expensive and takes no insurance. Since we were already with a TMJ “specialist” who is willing to treat the BMS we didn’t go to the “pathologist” yet, but we may HAVE to soon. Not only is BMS starving my little hubby of nutrition, but it’s eating into our life savings also! Again… thank you for answering me. It’s so good to know there are others out there going through the same thing. I don’t feel quite so alone. God Bless you!!!

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Thank you, but I could not figure out how to connect. I do suffer with severe bms and have posted ideas as to using very thin bite plates to relieve the pain. Sorry I am so lacking in using my iPad in detail.Connielaine

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@adkhs3333

Thank you so much for the input! Excellent idea about the toothpaste… I will do that immediately. We are in a Rehab Center (due to hubby’s nutrition being severely impacted by a swollen, painful tongue) and they do have him on Magic Mouthwash… and I think it does help. As to the oral surgeon… we did go to one and he said he doesn’t treat TMJ or BMS … then referred us to another dentist that bills himself as a “maxillofacial pain pathologist” … very expensive and takes no insurance. Since we were already with a TMJ “specialist” who is willing to treat the BMS we didn’t go to the “pathologist” yet, but we may HAVE to soon. Not only is BMS starving my little hubby of nutrition, but it’s eating into our life savings also! Again… thank you for answering me. It’s so good to know there are others out there going through the same thing. I don’t feel quite so alone. God Bless you!!!

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You answered perfectly @connielaine. Just keep doing what you’re doing. Your messages are being posted to the message board.

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Several of you have talked about taking clonazepam (Klonopin) to help relieve burning mouth syndrome. We took your questions about its use and withdrawal to a Mayo Clinic pharmacist. Here is what she responded:

“Clonazepam (Klonopin) is one medication in a class of medications called benzodiazepines. These medications are used in a variety of conditions and can cause dizziness and drowsiness. Patients who are taking benzodiazepines should avoid activities that require attention or coordination while these effects persist. Patients should not drink alcohol while taking benzodiazepines because the combination could cause breathing to become too slow. Patients should seek medical attention for very rare effects like allergic reactions, worsening mood, seizures or extreme drowsiness.

When taken regularly, benzodiazepines can cause physical and psychological dependence and withdrawl. The withdrawl syndrome can cause changes to sleep and mood, upset stomach, pain and changes in perception and memory. Rarely seizures can occur during withdrawl. The effects of withdrawl can be minimized by tapering off of the medication slowly. One strategy is reducing the dose by half each week, but your doctor can provide individualized tapering instructions. Withdrawl can begin within a few days of last dose or sooner in patients taking higher or more frequent dosing. Withdrawl usually peaks around 2 weeks.

The pain from burning mouth syndrome can interfere with sleep, which can interfere with mood and functioning. Clonazepam used in Burning Mouth Syndrome is typically sucked and held in the mouth for 3 minutes and then spit out up to three times a day. Because the drug is still absorbed by the body from sucking the tablet, doses could potentially lead to dependence and other adverse effects even though the remainder of the tablet is spit out. Doses used in burning mouth syndrome are typically very low, however burning mouth syndrome can last for months to years. Tapering may be appropriate, as continued use over this period could contribute to dependence and withdrawl. Other drugs can be utilized to relieve pain in burning mouth syndrome including tricyclic antidepressants like amitriptyline, alpha lipoic acid, anticonvulsants like gabapentin, anesthetics like lidocaine or hot pepper, and water oral rinses. Treatments for dry mouth or candida infection, if appropriate, are used as well.”

Causes of Burning Mouth Syndrome can be found by following this link. http://mayocl.in/2ebUG8h

For those using clonazepam in burning mouth syndrome: Do you use clonazepam when pain peaks later in the day, or are you using it throughout the day?

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Please read my replies.I’m sheetrock0231
I’ve been suffering for 20 plus years.
I’ve done everything. God bless,all who suffer from this debilitating condition.
I refer to it as hell on earth.

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@lexie

I am a 55 year old woman who has had this for 13 years. It is devastating and has completely changed my life…I belong to a group of woman on line who have this and we are trying to figure out how to treat this. I have decided to go to a holistic dr to get bioidentical hormones. I think it’s either that or from GERD, something going on in our digestive track. will be gettng my kit for hormonal testing…will post my results.

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Hi my name is Patty.I’ve suffered with b.m.s and trigeminal neuralgia. I can tell you from all my expierences,and where I’ve been,and what I’ve done.There is a nerve that comes from the brain,and neurologist know that.They can’t operate because they don’t know what nerve it is.Why,some get it from an accident, some get it from damaged dental work.i.e.hitting wrong nerve.Then there’s pis menopausal women,whom get it from the nerve as well.Last but not least ,depression,can trigger that nerve. All the meds,homopathic meds,acupuncture, priest healers,and hypothesis, can’t do a thing for all of us who suffer.Trigeminal nerve can be helped,with syber knife or gamma knife.But sadly I have both,so I’m not a candidate for that procedure. It is treated with no cutting.They place your head in a type of helmut,and zap the trigeminal nerve .Please keep in touch with me.20 plus years, I have done it all.

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Hi Patty (@sheetrock0131),
I noticed you mentioned earlier (http://mayocl.in/2sczs4N) that clonazepam does help relieve the pain for you somewhat. And that cymbalta and lyrica are also often used by people with BMS. Do you take clonazepam when the pain hits a peak, or do you tend to use it throughout the day? What works for you?

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@lisalucier

Hi Patty (@sheetrock0131),
I noticed you mentioned earlier (http://mayocl.in/2sczs4N) that clonazepam does help relieve the pain for you somewhat. And that cymbalta and lyrica are also often used by people with BMS. Do you take clonazepam when the pain hits a peak, or do you tend to use it throughout the day? What works for you?

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I take it throughout the day.I take 1in morning,and 2 at night.they are 0.5 mil.

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@lisalucier

Hi Patty (@sheetrock0131),
I noticed you mentioned earlier (http://mayocl.in/2sczs4N) that clonazepam does help relieve the pain for you somewhat. And that cymbalta and lyrica are also often used by people with BMS. Do you take clonazepam when the pain hits a peak, or do you tend to use it throughout the day? What works for you?

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@Thanks for the information. Do you take other meds as well? I also take Clonozepam. One at noon, one at mid-afternoon and one at night. They are 1.0 mil. I take a daily dose of Cymbalta as well, 20 mil at noon and 20 mil at mid-afternoon. Added to my BMS is TMJ and occasional migraines. Yoga is a wonderful release, along with exercises prescribed by a PT. It’s a full-time job staying functional, but staying connected to others who understand the condition is critical for me.

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@lisalucier

Hi Patty (@sheetrock0131),
I noticed you mentioned earlier (http://mayocl.in/2sczs4N) that clonazepam does help relieve the pain for you somewhat. And that cymbalta and lyrica are also often used by people with BMS. Do you take clonazepam when the pain hits a peak, or do you tend to use it throughout the day? What works for you?

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I do take cymbalta,2 per day.I believe they are 20mil
I have nerve pain in the head,which is the trigeminal nerve.i get nerve blocks everymonth. They are hard to bear,the needle goes right into my temples,and many more around the head,and forehead.Im glad you responded.Please feel free to ask anytime.Its good to relate to someone,who feel your pain.God bless

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