Breast Radiation--Positions, Advantages/Disadvantages - Care To Share?

Posted by Dee @danielad, Feb 14, 2020

Hello all and HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY! I read somewhere that this holiday is not meant ONLY for lovers, but also for mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, friends … I will add — "YOURSELF". Love yourself, the person that you were, the person that you are, the person you will become … OK, this is all for my philosophizing, for today. 😉

Going to my subject of "Breast Radiation — Positions, Advantages/Disadvantages" — I would like to know from anyone who wishes to share, and has or will have radiation treatments, the "position" you were/will be in and its advantages/disadvantages, issues, etc. For instance, I am at my 3rd radiation treatment and am "face down". Can you share yours and maybe provide additional information? I will share my experience as well, particularly after I meet my Radiation Oncologist on Tue 18 Feb.

Be Well and Love Yourself!

–Dee

Oh … By the way, I had a CT of the lungs yesterday; a 3-month follow up for a nodule. All is well — The nodule is stable. Feeling less stressed!!!! 🙂

–Dee

REPLY
@danielad

Hello @baker1 — I am at the 10th radiation treatment of 20. Still face down. I have had issues with the breathing (no opening in the "face holder"). Unbelievable! I refused to do any other treatments without oxygen. Now I have oxygen during the treatment and I feel a lot better. You would think it should part of their Standard Operating Procedures! Nope, I was the first patient in that position … Oh well!

I don't think it is a position-related situation, but I have developed nausea and weakness. This since my 6th treatment. Did you? Has anyone else? I read that nausea in breast radiation treatments is "very, very rare" … So what the heck? I see my radiation oncologist this evening, so I will ask him as well.

Thanks to all for your replies and comments!

–Dee

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@danielad
Hi, Dee,

Firstly, I must commend you for taking control of your treatments by requesting oxygen. Too many of us see a problem, feel intimidated by the treatments and/or professionals, and then don't speak up. Good on you!

As to nausea, and from what I understand, some people do experience it and, when they do, it often is when the dose and/or area is increased. One thing which you might try to do is to eat several light (easy to digest, non-greasy) meals during the day, instead of a few, heavier meals.

Wishing you a productive discussion with your radiation oncologist!

REPLY
@danielad

Hello @baker1 — I am at the 10th radiation treatment of 20. Still face down. I have had issues with the breathing (no opening in the "face holder"). Unbelievable! I refused to do any other treatments without oxygen. Now I have oxygen during the treatment and I feel a lot better. You would think it should part of their Standard Operating Procedures! Nope, I was the first patient in that position … Oh well!

I don't think it is a position-related situation, but I have developed nausea and weakness. This since my 6th treatment. Did you? Has anyone else? I read that nausea in breast radiation treatments is "very, very rare" … So what the heck? I see my radiation oncologist this evening, so I will ask him as well.

Thanks to all for your replies and comments!

–Dee

Jump to this post

Dee@danielad, I did my 15 radiation treatments in December 2018 and early January 2019. I did have a day or two of very mild nausea. Last week my primary care doctor told me that a recent chest x-ray shows that I have some fluid in my lung and a tiny blip on the EKG. Both are probably from radiation to my left breast. I’m waiting on an appointment with a cardiologist. This all may be nothing or to could be more trouble. And to think that I had thought that I had gotten through breast cancer treatments Scott free! 🥴
Best of luck to you in your treatments.

REPLY
@elizm

@danielad
Hi, Dee,

Firstly, I must commend you for taking control of your treatments by requesting oxygen. Too many of us see a problem, feel intimidated by the treatments and/or professionals, and then don't speak up. Good on you!

As to nausea, and from what I understand, some people do experience it and, when they do, it often is when the dose and/or area is increased. One thing which you might try to do is to eat several light (easy to digest, non-greasy) meals during the day, instead of a few, heavier meals.

Wishing you a productive discussion with your radiation oncologist!

Jump to this post

Hello @elizm – – Thanks! The only thing I regret is NOT talking sooner. Or actually, NOT "acting" sooner — it took me two days! Yes, we all need to learn to speak up and take charge of our own health.

I talked to my radiation oncologist yesterday; he said the nausea is not due to the radiotherapy; however, he did give me a prescription. Thanks for your recommendation on meals, I have started doing that. So far, so good.
–Dee

REPLY
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