Bow Hunters Syndrome/Stroke-Rotational occlusion of vertebral artery

Posted by ajp2019 @ajp2019, Dec 23, 2019

Is there a Neuro-Surgeon &/or Radiologist at MAYO who has seen/diagnosed/treated this condition? I found this:- Recommended procedure to confirm preliminary diagnosis "- Imaging B-mode transcranial color-coded duplex (TCCD), combines pulsed wave Doppler ultrasound with a cross-sectional view of the area of insonation.
– This allows identification of the arteries in relation to various anatomic locations.
– The color-coded Doppler also depicts the direction of the flow in relation to the probe (transducer) while recording blood flow velocities.
– In TCCD, the angle of insonation can be measured and used to correct the flow velocity measurement.
– A “Power Motion-Mode TCD (PMD/TCD)” will provide multi-gate flow information simultaneously in the power M-mode display.

Liked by Jennifer Hunter

@ajp2019 Hello. I am a Mayo spine surgery patient, and my surgeon Dr. Jeremy Fogelson has written medical literature about Bow Hunter's Syndrome. The neurologist that he had evaluate me also has literature about Bow Hunter's. I also searched with Google Scholar for Mayo Clinic and Bow Hunter's Syndrome and found some literature and I looked up the author's names on the Mayo Website. Here are some links for the Mayo Rochester campus and biographies of doctors to contact at Mayo. I can tell you from my experience as a surgical patient, that the care I received was skilled and compassionate and I had a great recovery. I highly recommend Dr. Fogelson and I am one of his patient stories you will find with his profile. I had unusual symptoms with my spine problem and found Dr. Fogelson because of a paper he co-authored. I did also find some literature related to Bow Hunters and authors at the Mayo Jacksonville campus.

Dr. Fogelson would be a good start. You can call Mayo and set up a patient account and arrange to send in imaging for evaluation, and you can ask that it be sent to Dr. Fogelson. From what I'm finding, there are several doctors at Mayo Rochester with interests in Bow Hunter's. I hope this helps.
https://journals.lww.com/contempneurosurg/Citation/2014/02280/Bow_Hunter_Syndrome.1.aspx
https://www.mayoclinic.org/biographies/fogelson-jeremy-l-m-d/bio-20055624
One of the authors of this paper is Dr. John Bartleson, the neurologist I saw in the spine center.
https://thejns.org/view/journals/j-neurosurg/83/4/article-p737.xml
https://jnis.bmj.com/content/4/Suppl_1/A60.1.short
https://www.mayoclinic.org/biographies/brinjikji-waleed-m-d/bio-20433847
This link is literature from the Jacksonville campus.
https://jnis.bmj.com/content/4/Suppl_1/A60.1.short

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Hi Jennifer – Sincere thanks for responding. I will check out the links you provided. PS I am in Florida, so I'll try Jacksonville first. PPS – Anyone ever heard of the scan I need? (TCCD = Imaging B-mode trans-cranial color-coded duplex combines pulsed wave Doppler)

Liked by Jennifer Hunter

REPLY
@ajp2019

Hi Jennifer – Sincere thanks for responding. I will check out the links you provided. PS I am in Florida, so I'll try Jacksonville first. PPS – Anyone ever heard of the scan I need? (TCCD = Imaging B-mode trans-cranial color-coded duplex combines pulsed wave Doppler)

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@ajp2019 I think calling Mayo at Jacksonville would be a great first step. They can advise which doctors have interests in treating Bow Hunter's syndrome. Doppler imaging is an ultrasound where there put a wand in some gel on your skin and pick up images of blood circulation. The red or blue color indicates direction of blood flow and if it is an artery or vein. That color coding is used for this type of imaging all of the body. I've had Doppler imaging done on myself before. This link about the Atlas (C1) and Axis (C2) has a section that talks about Bow Hunter's Syndrome if you scroll it down. It is a technical article written by a physical therapist.
https://trainingandrehabilitation.com/atlas-joint-instability-causes-consequences-solutions/
I hope you'll share your status with us after you are evaluated and how you are doing. My C1 & C2 have been prone to rotating on their own from muscle spasms, but that was before my spine surgery and I also have thoracic outlet syndrome putting uneven pressure on my spine with extra tight muscles on one side which pulls harder on one side of my spine. I still can have a spasm that will cause some rotation, but not to the same degree as before. I make sure that I don't turn my head to the side while I'm sleeping.

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