Neuropathy and Brain Neuroplasticity

Posted by Barry Sheales @user_che214927, Feb 15, 2020

I have been diagnosed as having Peripheral-neuropathy. I am aged 89 and extremely fit. Iam on nil medication for any reason, and am not in pain.. I have studied the new science of Neuroplasticity, and have started following the practices I need to adopt and actuall regrow my neurons to a full recovery. Are there any brain exercises out there that I can review?

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Neuropathy group.

@rwinney

@sunnyflower Atta girl! I'm proud to know you. 💪🏼

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AAaawww, me too!! It's very special to have a new friend such as yourself. Thank you for your sweet words! 💗

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@rwinney

@sunnyflower Here are the roses I received yesterday from my hubby for our 30th wedding anniversary. I feel blessed to receive beautiful flowers from the good people in my life and always like to share with others to hopefully put a smile on someone's face. Today, my dear, it is YOU!!! May you enjoy the beauty, along with me. ❤

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WOWZERS Rachel!!!!!!!!! Happiest 30th and many, many more!!!!!!! My hubby calls me "Sunnyflower" or "Sunny Rose" and has roses delivered for occasions as well and I find it so beautiful of a gesture that it's hard to absorb! I'm so happy for you guys!

Recently my hubby has brought home the coolest balloons for no reason a couple of times. One reads, "You're Amazing" and the other, which is giant w/ soft, small boa-type fuzz surrounding it reads, "Love Always & Forever". They are on the wall a few feet from the foot of my bed where I mostly am so I love getting to see them all day long! I LOVE flowers but this is a unique, meaningful different recent change. I'm such a hopeless romantic that when they lose air and begin to sink, I tape them to the wall w/ painters tape! Who cares if they're flat? There's just something about seeing how a person feels about you in writing. It actually goes to a different part of the brain. Ahh, but that is NOT to minimize my love for flowers! My fav are baby pink roses.

Once he had flowers delivered and when I opened the door, I honestly couldn't think of a reason they were being delivered. The look of surprise and bewilderment on my face must have spoken volumes to the delivery girl b/c she said, "It's your anniversary". This was truly one of the most embarassing things that has ever happened to me! Of course I had known and thought about it many days before but my brain function impairment from the Gaba and pain couldn't make the connection at that particular time.
Did you guys get to go out to dinner or do anything for just yourselves? I hope so.

You're the best. Thanks for sharing such a great part of your life and the pic of the BEAUTIFUL roses!!!!! Hugs, Sunnyflower PS: I can't make my tablet here put in emoticons! I was able to do it w/ difficulty but now it won't. My phone does a beautiful job but it's easier to type here. Oh well…..HUGS!!!!!!!

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@jesfactsmon

@rwinney
Beauties! And congrats on your first 30. Good luck on the next 30.

Went to my Aunt's (93) and Uncle's (95) 65th anniversary a couple years ago. I told them that they only needed to make it another 17 to set the world record. Now it's 15. They are still going for it. I made them cut down on the all-weekend partying/carousing and have them going to the gym a couple times a day. I think they have a shot. (Kidding of course. They are sweethearts and don't party ALL weekend). 😊

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Wow Hank, that is a beautiful thing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Sunnyflower

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@sunnyflower

WOWZERS Rachel!!!!!!!!! Happiest 30th and many, many more!!!!!!! My hubby calls me "Sunnyflower" or "Sunny Rose" and has roses delivered for occasions as well and I find it so beautiful of a gesture that it's hard to absorb! I'm so happy for you guys!

Recently my hubby has brought home the coolest balloons for no reason a couple of times. One reads, "You're Amazing" and the other, which is giant w/ soft, small boa-type fuzz surrounding it reads, "Love Always & Forever". They are on the wall a few feet from the foot of my bed where I mostly am so I love getting to see them all day long! I LOVE flowers but this is a unique, meaningful different recent change. I'm such a hopeless romantic that when they lose air and begin to sink, I tape them to the wall w/ painters tape! Who cares if they're flat? There's just something about seeing how a person feels about you in writing. It actually goes to a different part of the brain. Ahh, but that is NOT to minimize my love for flowers! My fav are baby pink roses.

Once he had flowers delivered and when I opened the door, I honestly couldn't think of a reason they were being delivered. The look of surprise and bewilderment on my face must have spoken volumes to the delivery girl b/c she said, "It's your anniversary". This was truly one of the most embarassing things that has ever happened to me! Of course I had known and thought about it many days before but my brain function impairment from the Gaba and pain couldn't make the connection at that particular time.
Did you guys get to go out to dinner or do anything for just yourselves? I hope so.

You're the best. Thanks for sharing such a great part of your life and the pic of the BEAUTIFUL roses!!!!! Hugs, Sunnyflower PS: I can't make my tablet here put in emoticons! I was able to do it w/ difficulty but now it won't. My phone does a beautiful job but it's easier to type here. Oh well…..HUGS!!!!!!!

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@sunnyflower Awww….thank you and I Ioved your story. What a great husband you have! Enjoy, enjoy, enjoy!!! You deserve to find joy in any form because you are such a caring, genuine, sweetheart. I got the emojis covered, no worries…
🌞🌞🌞🌞🌞🌞🌞🌷🌷🌷⚘⚘⚘🌻🌻🌻

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@rwinney

@sunnyflower Awww….thank you and I Ioved your story. What a great husband you have! Enjoy, enjoy, enjoy!!! You deserve to find joy in any form because you are such a caring, genuine, sweetheart. I got the emojis covered, no worries…
🌞🌞🌞🌞🌞🌞🌞🌷🌷🌷⚘⚘⚘🌻🌻🌻

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Rachel, I LOVE these emojis! My devices don't have anything as cute. Boy have I slaughtered the spelling of anything related to emojis. Humility at it's finest! Be well, Sunnyflower

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@johnbishop

Just started reading an article I found, looks to be interesting and hopefully I can get through it 🙂

What is Neuroplasticity? A Psychologist Explains [+14 Exercises]: https://positivepsychology.com/neuroplasticity/

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John, user, etc. I just found another book on neuroplasticity in my hoard of books that I have had for a number of years, which I did not finish reading and forgot about. Someone may have already mentioned it here, “Train your Mind Change your Brain” by Sharon Begley. I never realized that the teachings of Buddhism are strongly entwined with the science of neuroplasticity. The Foreword is written by The Dalai Lama who speaks of the 1st Mind and Life Conference which took place in India 20 yrs. ago fostering dialogues between Buddhism and modern science. I will try to get through it and comment at a later date🙃 Helen

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@sunnyflower

WOWZERS Rachel!!!!!!!!! Happiest 30th and many, many more!!!!!!! My hubby calls me "Sunnyflower" or "Sunny Rose" and has roses delivered for occasions as well and I find it so beautiful of a gesture that it's hard to absorb! I'm so happy for you guys!

Recently my hubby has brought home the coolest balloons for no reason a couple of times. One reads, "You're Amazing" and the other, which is giant w/ soft, small boa-type fuzz surrounding it reads, "Love Always & Forever". They are on the wall a few feet from the foot of my bed where I mostly am so I love getting to see them all day long! I LOVE flowers but this is a unique, meaningful different recent change. I'm such a hopeless romantic that when they lose air and begin to sink, I tape them to the wall w/ painters tape! Who cares if they're flat? There's just something about seeing how a person feels about you in writing. It actually goes to a different part of the brain. Ahh, but that is NOT to minimize my love for flowers! My fav are baby pink roses.

Once he had flowers delivered and when I opened the door, I honestly couldn't think of a reason they were being delivered. The look of surprise and bewilderment on my face must have spoken volumes to the delivery girl b/c she said, "It's your anniversary". This was truly one of the most embarassing things that has ever happened to me! Of course I had known and thought about it many days before but my brain function impairment from the Gaba and pain couldn't make the connection at that particular time.
Did you guys get to go out to dinner or do anything for just yourselves? I hope so.

You're the best. Thanks for sharing such a great part of your life and the pic of the BEAUTIFUL roses!!!!! Hugs, Sunnyflower PS: I can't make my tablet here put in emoticons! I was able to do it w/ difficulty but now it won't. My phone does a beautiful job but it's easier to type here. Oh well…..HUGS!!!!!!!

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@sunnyflower Sunny, somehow I had missed reading this story about the balloons until this morning. This is SO SWEET! I am so happy you guys have such a wonderful and loving relationship. Since this discussion is about neuroplasticity, I'm going to say that LOVE must have a very positive effect on the brain, no doubt. I don't know what exactly it does to it, but I know that it changes (so much for the better) how the world looks and how life feels. The first experience of that powerful feeling came for me at 23 when God entered my life. It had nothing short of a miraculous effect on the rest of my entire life from a dark night to a warm sunny day.

Sunny, you are such a welcome addition to our little (big?) group of friend here on Connect. ❤️️❤️️❤️️

Best to you always, Hank

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@jesfactsmon

@sunnyflower Sunny, somehow I had missed reading this story about the balloons until this morning. This is SO SWEET! I am so happy you guys have such a wonderful and loving relationship. Since this discussion is about neuroplasticity, I'm going to say that LOVE must have a very positive effect on the brain, no doubt. I don't know what exactly it does to it, but I know that it changes (so much for the better) how the world looks and how life feels. The first experience of that powerful feeling came for me at 23 when God entered my life. It had nothing short of a miraculous effect on the rest of my entire life from a dark night to a warm sunny day.

Sunny, you are such a welcome addition to our little (big?) group of friend here on Connect. ❤️️❤️️❤️️

Best to you always, Hank

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Big, Hank, big, the group is big LOL! That means big blessings! Thanks for your kind words. And a big AMEN to how God can change a heart/life! I've seen it too many times to count! Mine included! His word as well! Have a blessed day and give LInda a hug from me! Sunnyflower

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@user_che214927 @dont
Hi Barry, a day or so ago in a post you reaffirmed your belief that Chapter 7 of Doidges book The Brain that Changes Itself is a key to understanding how the concept of neuroplasticity can be used to help one's neuropathy pain. Here is a link to that post: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/why-all-the-testing-if-there-is-no-cure/?commentsorderby=DESC#chv4-comment-stream-header

I just reskimmed chapter 7. Like the first time I read it, I didn't see anything in it to help a person directly affect their neuropathy. Most of the chapter discusses phantom pain experiments. There are a couple vague statements about somehow using one's imagination in some way. Would you mind pointing out the specific things in chapter 7 that you found helpful? I am missing it. You say in your post "You dominate the problem, not the other way." It sounds like you are exerting will power to effectively ignore your discomfort and by doing that you diminish it. Does that sum up your approach?

Personally, I am not seeing anything in that chapter to use as even an inspiration for how to reduce nerve pain, let alone any specific instructions, other than shear will power. And maybe that is the crux of it. Just want to confirm with you if that sums up your take.

Any elaboration on this from you would be appreciated, by myself and by Don T. Thanks, Hank

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@jesfactsmon

@user_che214927 @dont
Hi Barry, a day or so ago in a post you reaffirmed your belief that Chapter 7 of Doidges book The Brain that Changes Itself is a key to understanding how the concept of neuroplasticity can be used to help one's neuropathy pain. Here is a link to that post: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/why-all-the-testing-if-there-is-no-cure/?commentsorderby=DESC#chv4-comment-stream-header

I just reskimmed chapter 7. Like the first time I read it, I didn't see anything in it to help a person directly affect their neuropathy. Most of the chapter discusses phantom pain experiments. There are a couple vague statements about somehow using one's imagination in some way. Would you mind pointing out the specific things in chapter 7 that you found helpful? I am missing it. You say in your post "You dominate the problem, not the other way." It sounds like you are exerting will power to effectively ignore your discomfort and by doing that you diminish it. Does that sum up your approach?

Personally, I am not seeing anything in that chapter to use as even an inspiration for how to reduce nerve pain, let alone any specific instructions, other than shear will power. And maybe that is the crux of it. Just want to confirm with you if that sums up your take.

Any elaboration on this from you would be appreciated, by myself and by Don T. Thanks, Hank

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@jesfactsmon @user_che214927 @dont Hi guys, I also read chapter 7 of the book, and do not remember specific neuroplasticity activities to follow that were written there. I also don't understand how you follow these type of activities when your pain is pretty much all day long, at different levels. No one can do this all day long! I do what I can to not focus on pain by distracting myself to other activities that I like, and sometimes, that works. Sometimes the pain is too severe. Sometimes I imagine that my pain is a red box, and in my mind, I imagine the box to be getting smaller and smaller. Sometimes, with burning pain, I go along with the burning, and picture myself on the beach, in a hot, pleasurable sun. That actually seems to help!!! I did this with hot flashes during menopause, as well. I just go with the burning, instead of fighting it. Interestingly, and I do know I told Rachel this, I talked to Jonathan Kuttner's daughter all about my nerve pain. Jonathan Kuttner is a prominent pain doc in Australia, and his daughter Naomi works with him. I did a lengthy survey about my pain, and essentially, Naomi responded to it via a personal video to me. She essentially said that neuroplastic activities for neuropathic type pain do not necessarily work very well. She was very honest with me. And her dad is a top pain specialist in Australia. So that is that. Just thought I would contribute what I know. This pain sucks. I know that. Lori Renee

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@jesfactsmon

@user_che214927 @dont
Hi Barry, a day or so ago in a post you reaffirmed your belief that Chapter 7 of Doidges book The Brain that Changes Itself is a key to understanding how the concept of neuroplasticity can be used to help one's neuropathy pain. Here is a link to that post: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/why-all-the-testing-if-there-is-no-cure/?commentsorderby=DESC#chv4-comment-stream-header

I just reskimmed chapter 7. Like the first time I read it, I didn't see anything in it to help a person directly affect their neuropathy. Most of the chapter discusses phantom pain experiments. There are a couple vague statements about somehow using one's imagination in some way. Would you mind pointing out the specific things in chapter 7 that you found helpful? I am missing it. You say in your post "You dominate the problem, not the other way." It sounds like you are exerting will power to effectively ignore your discomfort and by doing that you diminish it. Does that sum up your approach?

Personally, I am not seeing anything in that chapter to use as even an inspiration for how to reduce nerve pain, let alone any specific instructions, other than shear will power. And maybe that is the crux of it. Just want to confirm with you if that sums up your take.

Any elaboration on this from you would be appreciated, by myself and by Don T. Thanks, Hank

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You are right Hank, that chapter, on its own, will not totally solve the pain, nor explan neuroplasticity. Both of Doidge's book are not for casual reading. It took me just on 2 months to read his first book.I have double and triply checked his credentials, and other mentioned scientists regarding this new sensational breakthrough that the brain really is plastic and can regrow itself. Then on reading his second book book " The brains way of healing", plus the many of his films on youtube, I am now totally convinced that I will recover from peripheral-neuropathy, if I do the work required. That is why I am so enthusiastic. Now I also understand that if a person does not have that beleif, after their research, they will be right; It will not work for them. Now regarding pain. It is a necessary part of life as it warns the brain of danger. It is our choice how to handle pain. Take pain killers and thwart messages being sent to the brain, or grit you teeth until we can create many , probably miĺlions of new neurons to reduce it as best we can.In my youth I was an elite athlete in foofball and athletics, but at age of 21 suffered an ACL of my right knee. From that dayI never played any sport, not even vigorous dancing.Since then I have battled huge weight increase, and surgery operations on knee, hip, and spine, and with it a life of pain. So I do understand pain in all its complexities. I have studied nutrition and said farewell being very overweight. I have studied meditation, and that has helped reduce pain but not totally, and I am happy with that. I am aged 89 and on nil medication of any description. I totally believe in neuroplasticity, and WILL BEAT this scourge of peripheral-neuropathy. Incidently I inherited it from unknown Irish ancestor, and recently found that my 62 year son has been diagnosed with it also. Now I hope that explains why I am so excited , and beleive it will happen, pain or nor pain. Best wishes from down under Australia.

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@user_che214927

You are right Hank, that chapter, on its own, will not totally solve the pain, nor explan neuroplasticity. Both of Doidge's book are not for casual reading. It took me just on 2 months to read his first book.I have double and triply checked his credentials, and other mentioned scientists regarding this new sensational breakthrough that the brain really is plastic and can regrow itself. Then on reading his second book book " The brains way of healing", plus the many of his films on youtube, I am now totally convinced that I will recover from peripheral-neuropathy, if I do the work required. That is why I am so enthusiastic. Now I also understand that if a person does not have that beleif, after their research, they will be right; It will not work for them. Now regarding pain. It is a necessary part of life as it warns the brain of danger. It is our choice how to handle pain. Take pain killers and thwart messages being sent to the brain, or grit you teeth until we can create many , probably miĺlions of new neurons to reduce it as best we can.In my youth I was an elite athlete in foofball and athletics, but at age of 21 suffered an ACL of my right knee. From that dayI never played any sport, not even vigorous dancing.Since then I have battled huge weight increase, and surgery operations on knee, hip, and spine, and with it a life of pain. So I do understand pain in all its complexities. I have studied nutrition and said farewell being very overweight. I have studied meditation, and that has helped reduce pain but not totally, and I am happy with that. I am aged 89 and on nil medication of any description. I totally believe in neuroplasticity, and WILL BEAT this scourge of peripheral-neuropathy. Incidently I inherited it from unknown Irish ancestor, and recently found that my 62 year son has been diagnosed with it also. Now I hope that explains why I am so excited , and beleive it will happen, pain or nor pain. Best wishes from down under Australia.

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@user_che214927
Thanks Barry. I have not yet finished the first book, am reading it slowly. I agree neuroplasticity is fascinating. I still don't know exactly what it is that you do, other than use raw willpower to overcome pain. I know my wife who has PN is too weak to muster the amount of energy that would take to achieve. She is barely able to just be. Her pain drags her down SO MUCH! If her feet would just stop burning I know she would be much more energetic. She is very frustrated not to be able to do the things she wants to do.

I guess I will keep reading and maybe watch some of Doidge on YouTube. I didn't know about his videos. I think it is great you are not using any painkillers. Did you used to, before neuroplasticity came into your life? Also commend you on the weight loss. You seem like a very young and vibrant person for 89, I have a feeling you will be posting for years to come. Best, Hank

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