Bamlanivimab monoclonal antibodies interacting with COVID vaccines

Posted by connie1977 @connie1977, May 2 3:49pm

This past January I came down with Covid and received the Bamlanivimab transfusion from Eli Lilly. I am trying to find out what reaction(s) people, who have also received the transfusion and then received the COVID vaccinations, experienced.

@connie1977 I don’t know the answer to your question, but there are most probably some who do. While we wait for them to come online, let me ask a question. You said that you received the monoclonal antibody bamlanivimab to treat your Covid infection, and now want to hear from others with a similar experience. If I may ask, what experience did you have?

REPLY
@becsbuddy

@connie1977 I don’t know the answer to your question, but there are most probably some who do. While we wait for them to come online, let me ask a question. You said that you received the monoclonal antibody bamlanivimab to treat your Covid infection, and now want to hear from others with a similar experience. If I may ask, what experience did you have?

Jump to this post

I have not received the vaccine yet. When we (husband and I) received the infusion, we were told, Eli Lily did not know how they would interact with each other. Since I know I still have antibodies (tested) in my body, I am not in a hurry to get vaccinated.

REPLY

@connie1977 – Good morning and welcome to Mayo Connect. What a great question. Were you told anything about the long-term effects of the antibody against any future infection possibility or vaccine possibilities and interactions? This drug was stopped as a preventive measure because of worries about non-protection against the variants. And recently it was found to not, by itself, stop the South African variant. Lily is now working on a new infusion that will cover the variants (hopefully). Here is the story:
https://www.fiercebiotech.com/research/lilly-abcellera-tout-covid-antibody-s-combination-ability-as-it-loses-strength-against
Since COVID variants are the main type of viruses infecting people right now if you have been told that it's ok to have the vaccine, if I were you, no matter how scary, then I would jump on that bandwagon and get protected. It's also not known how much long-term protection your antibodies will serve you with the variants.

There have been a lot of CDC advisements against taking certain medications prior to being vaccinated. The only thing that I could find about Bamlanivimab was to wait at least 90 days before having any vaccine, including the ones now for COVID. So that's a plus.

Variants are more deadly and more easily spread than it's parents. What do you think? Have you been told not to have the vaccine?

REPLY

Our paperwork we received said to get the vaccination after 90 days (as you stated), but it is the "BUT" we are very uncomfortable with. I don't like playing Russian Roulette. I am hoping that either Eli Lily comes forward with more information after checking with other recipients of the infusion who has had the vaccines. Or, hopefully someone will see this post who has had both and will comment. My son (who did not have the infusion but did have Covid) had a terrible reaction to the Moderna vaccination. Since we are seeing more and more reports saying the second vaccination is not warranted if you have had Covid, he skipped the second round. There are too many unknowns. There should be more information at this point in time if people who have had the infusion were (are) are tracked on their reactions to the vaccination.

REPLY
@connie1977

Our paperwork we received said to get the vaccination after 90 days (as you stated), but it is the "BUT" we are very uncomfortable with. I don't like playing Russian Roulette. I am hoping that either Eli Lily comes forward with more information after checking with other recipients of the infusion who has had the vaccines. Or, hopefully someone will see this post who has had both and will comment. My son (who did not have the infusion but did have Covid) had a terrible reaction to the Moderna vaccination. Since we are seeing more and more reports saying the second vaccination is not warranted if you have had Covid, he skipped the second round. There are too many unknowns. There should be more information at this point in time if people who have had the infusion were (are) are tracked on their reactions to the vaccination.

Jump to this post

@connie1977– I also had the Moderna shot and there's no way of getting around reactions to the second dose. It was rough. But except for being tired most reactions only last a couple of days for most people.

The only way that I'm hearing that the second shot is not needed if you have had the virus itself is by people outside of the medical field. Science experts say that everyone who can be vaccinated should be vaccinated.

There is way too much misinformation going around. As I have said, many times while on my bandwagon (quoting my friend @sueinmn) you have the right to make up your own mind about whether to have the vaccine or not. But please keep in mind that vaccines are necessary to protect populations of people so that we can get out of this mess.

I do understand your quandary, though. It would seem as if some information is slow to come but look at the strides that have already come, the knowledge that has already been gained. This is only a little over a year old and we all want answers immediately for our answers about our particular situations. Science sometimes takes a while to spew up answers, otherwise, it wouldn't be true, nor honest.

I hope that you get your answers. Please remember too, that Mayo Clinic would not advise for vaccines if we didn't believe in its results or the truth of its science. I am also aware that certain cases might take a bit more vigilance to help make those decisions.

Merry

REPLY

This past February, my wife and I tested pos for the virus and received the Bamlanivimab transfusion from Eli Lilly. I am trying to find out why we would need to be vaccinated, as recovery from the virus should have produced antibodies and provided immunization as well as having the antibodies from the transfusion. Appreciate any info and/or references!

REPLY

@mal– Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. From what I understand it is because no one knows how long your immunity will last from February. The vaccines will ensure at least 7+ months of a "boosted" immunity. I know that @connie1977 has been waiting for answers from Eli Lilly, perhaps she has more information?

REPLY
@merpreb

@mal– Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. From what I understand it is because no one knows how long your immunity will last from February. The vaccines will ensure at least 7+ months of a "boosted" immunity. I know that @connie1977 has been waiting for answers from Eli Lilly, perhaps she has more information?

Jump to this post

Thank you, Merry! Will hope to hrat from Connie.
Regards,Mal

REPLY

I had the infusion in January. Had my first Moderna injection 2 1/2 weeks ago. I was so sick the next day, I feared I was getting COVID again. That lasted about 48 hours. Then, the injection site had a terrible reaction. I had a red, rashly welt, bigger than a softball for a good week. It hurt, was itchy & looked awful. Google moderna arm or COVID arm. My arm still has a red circle, about the size of a tennis ball, but it’s flat and dry and doesn’t bother me. I am set to get the 2nd dose next week, & am nervous, but hoping for the best. I still have numerous things happening with what they are calling Long COVID, so am hoping the injections eliminate those symptoms.

REPLY
@mal

This past February, my wife and I tested pos for the virus and received the Bamlanivimab transfusion from Eli Lilly. I am trying to find out why we would need to be vaccinated, as recovery from the virus should have produced antibodies and provided immunization as well as having the antibodies from the transfusion. Appreciate any info and/or references!

Jump to this post

@mlmc21 Thank you for telling us about your experience.

@mal I have looked all over the Lilly and CDC sites, and didn't find a definitive answer for you. So, I went to my secondary source. My daughter is a telemed nurse, and has been dealing with all things Covid since last March. I asked her about what they tell patients about vaccine after infusion and why. Her large urban hospital/clinic group updates their Covid guidance at least daily.

Their advice, from the Infectious Disease and Epidemiology docs is to wait 90 days after test-confirmed infection or antibody infusion and get the vaccine.

The reason – the monoclonal antibodies are intended to provide a temporary boost to the immune system, and they don't know how long the antibodies will last. Typical after-virus antibodies range from undetectable to lasting about 4-5 months for most people.

With the vaccine there is good evidence that immunity lasts at least 7 months, based on regular testing of the early recipients in the clinical trials.

Also, her plea to you: "Please get vaccinated – we see people every day who have Covid for the second time. Even though this can and does happen after full vaccination symptoms are more mild."
Sue

REPLY
@mlmc21

I had the infusion in January. Had my first Moderna injection 2 1/2 weeks ago. I was so sick the next day, I feared I was getting COVID again. That lasted about 48 hours. Then, the injection site had a terrible reaction. I had a red, rashly welt, bigger than a softball for a good week. It hurt, was itchy & looked awful. Google moderna arm or COVID arm. My arm still has a red circle, about the size of a tennis ball, but it’s flat and dry and doesn’t bother me. I am set to get the 2nd dose next week, & am nervous, but hoping for the best. I still have numerous things happening with what they are calling Long COVID, so am hoping the injections eliminate those symptoms.

Jump to this post

Thank you for sharing your experience.

REPLY
@sueinmn

@mlmc21 Thank you for telling us about your experience.

@mal I have looked all over the Lilly and CDC sites, and didn't find a definitive answer for you. So, I went to my secondary source. My daughter is a telemed nurse, and has been dealing with all things Covid since last March. I asked her about what they tell patients about vaccine after infusion and why. Her large urban hospital/clinic group updates their Covid guidance at least daily.

Their advice, from the Infectious Disease and Epidemiology docs is to wait 90 days after test-confirmed infection or antibody infusion and get the vaccine.

The reason – the monoclonal antibodies are intended to provide a temporary boost to the immune system, and they don't know how long the antibodies will last. Typical after-virus antibodies range from undetectable to lasting about 4-5 months for most people.

With the vaccine there is good evidence that immunity lasts at least 7 months, based on regular testing of the early recipients in the clinical trials.

Also, her plea to you: "Please get vaccinated – we see people every day who have Covid for the second time. Even though this can and does happen after full vaccination symptoms are more mild."
Sue

Jump to this post

I am thinking that I will routinely check my antibody levels (through blood donations) and once they are no longer present; I will then get the vaccinations.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.