Ask your doctor or pain clinic

Posted by wishingtobepain @wishingtobepain, Nov 19, 2020

Just recently moved back to Missouri from Washington state when I found out my pain clinic here was not prescribing narcotics any more.
I asked them for listing of doctors or clinics in area that still do, they had no issue with printing out for me. I found a wonderful doctor, that I'm very comfortable with that prescribes narcotics.
I was taking 15mg of extended release morphine up to 3 times a day. Now I am taking 2 50mg tramadol up to 3 times a day. I honestly think it works better than morphine.
Just a thought since most of us our dealing with not getting meds we've been on. I was on morphine for over 12 years, the pain clinic just says no and doesn't offer anything for pain or offering to help with withdraws. I really didn't have much withdraw symptoms, but went 3 weeks without pain meds, and it was not fun!!

@faithwalker007

Hank,
Women have twice if not more the pain receptors than men biologically. It’s not fair or right to ANYONE to compare themselves to how another handles a pain load. That will drive them into depression faster than a speeding bullet. DO NOT DO THAT TO YOURSELF AND YOUR LOVED ONES.
As for me? I spend most of my day in my recliner, the equivalent to my bed. I spend 40% of my day (on a good day) doing things around the house that will help my husband and me be productive. I organize my craft room, paint, wipe down the kitchen and clean the kitchen IF it’s not overwhelming. I even groom my service dog! Not all of these and definitely not at once.
I spend time with my hubby and play with our dog who is painfully neglected by me on my down days.
This is my life and I have compensated not BECAUSE of the pain but in spite of it.
Pain does not control me. I live my life anyway and I’m happy. I breathe through it and have learned that it is another feature of me that people will either accept or not.
My quality of life is the defining factor and management of that factor affects it, yes.
Just like my seizures, migraines, and other diseases which I have affect it.
But they don’t DEFINE OR CONTROL who I am. I am Renee, child of God, wife of James, mother of Sean, and warrior.
That is who I have always been and will continue to be.
Please, people, don’t let an indicator, something your body is using to try to help you, overwhelm you into taking your purpose for life away.

Jump to this post

Good for you! I am printing this and will read daily.

REPLY
@faithwalker007

Hank, my overall pain on a 1-10 scale depends on the day but for two hours of the day it rests at 6. As I told my pain specialist, it then climbs to a 7/8, I take my meds, it dives back to 6, four hours later it climbs to a 7/8 and stays there even with pain meds. By night fall I’m around a 8/9. I take my next long term pain med so I can try to sleep but by then I’m in so much pain, sleep is impossible. I take my next pain meds and I finally doze about 3am only to wake around 6 or 8am and start the day again!

Jump to this post

I’ve learned to breathe and compartmentalize a lot of the burning and aching. The shooting and lancing pain takes more effort but I can do that too. The cramps hit without warning and James helps with those. We’re getting better as a team in taming those down in quick order but they drive my levels up faster than anything. Standing is something I can’t tolerate but I can’t sit forever. Lol I pay for my wandering.

REPLY
@faithwalker007

Hank,
Women have twice if not more the pain receptors than men biologically. It’s not fair or right to ANYONE to compare themselves to how another handles a pain load. That will drive them into depression faster than a speeding bullet. DO NOT DO THAT TO YOURSELF AND YOUR LOVED ONES.
As for me? I spend most of my day in my recliner, the equivalent to my bed. I spend 40% of my day (on a good day) doing things around the house that will help my husband and me be productive. I organize my craft room, paint, wipe down the kitchen and clean the kitchen IF it’s not overwhelming. I even groom my service dog! Not all of these and definitely not at once.
I spend time with my hubby and play with our dog who is painfully neglected by me on my down days.
This is my life and I have compensated not BECAUSE of the pain but in spite of it.
Pain does not control me. I live my life anyway and I’m happy. I breathe through it and have learned that it is another feature of me that people will either accept or not.
My quality of life is the defining factor and management of that factor affects it, yes.
Just like my seizures, migraines, and other diseases which I have affect it.
But they don’t DEFINE OR CONTROL who I am. I am Renee, child of God, wife of James, mother of Sean, and warrior.
That is who I have always been and will continue to be.
Please, people, don’t let an indicator, something your body is using to try to help you, overwhelm you into taking your purpose for life away.

Jump to this post

@faithwalker007 Renee I love the words you wrote.

Every time I am asked my pain level I cringe… a chart number just does not put it in perspective. You have the overall pain and then a specific area pain. .. shoulder, back, knee, foot, hand, abdominal, etc. How much do you let that pain take you over. ..

I do not like taking an opiate. I cannot take nsaids nor other meds for pain. I had to up the dosage earlier this year for some thumb surgery. I asked my doctor to lower the number of pills back down and here I am two months later asking him to up the number again. I am having another body issue. I am getting an injection on Monday that will hopefully calm the pain.

Friends tell me I am so strong and so brave. I feel weak and like I am drowning at times. At those times I say some fervent prayers to help me get through them and take one moment at a time. I try to distract myself from pain by occupying my mind with other things. Crochet usually is my go-to, but the surgery earlier this year was for my thumb. My thumb is only up to small amounts of the activity. So puzzles and games on my tablet. I cannot concentrate on novels, so short times reading scriptures, short stories and poems.

My husband starts telling doctors that I can tolerate more pain than he ever could. I tell him to hush up. I see him go through pain daily.. that I could not handle. He is no weaker nor stronger than I when it comes to pain. We all handle pain in our own way. Lately pain has slowed us both. We went for a drive last week. It was painful on our bodies.. but oh the good it did our souls!!

Always put Joy in your life so you will have Happiness in your soul.

ZeeGee

REPLY
@fourof5zs

@faithwalker007 Renee I love the words you wrote.

Every time I am asked my pain level I cringe… a chart number just does not put it in perspective. You have the overall pain and then a specific area pain. .. shoulder, back, knee, foot, hand, abdominal, etc. How much do you let that pain take you over. ..

I do not like taking an opiate. I cannot take nsaids nor other meds for pain. I had to up the dosage earlier this year for some thumb surgery. I asked my doctor to lower the number of pills back down and here I am two months later asking him to up the number again. I am having another body issue. I am getting an injection on Monday that will hopefully calm the pain.

Friends tell me I am so strong and so brave. I feel weak and like I am drowning at times. At those times I say some fervent prayers to help me get through them and take one moment at a time. I try to distract myself from pain by occupying my mind with other things. Crochet usually is my go-to, but the surgery earlier this year was for my thumb. My thumb is only up to small amounts of the activity. So puzzles and games on my tablet. I cannot concentrate on novels, so short times reading scriptures, short stories and poems.

My husband starts telling doctors that I can tolerate more pain than he ever could. I tell him to hush up. I see him go through pain daily.. that I could not handle. He is no weaker nor stronger than I when it comes to pain. We all handle pain in our own way. Lately pain has slowed us both. We went for a drive last week. It was painful on our bodies.. but oh the good it did our souls!!

Always put Joy in your life so you will have Happiness in your soul.

ZeeGee

Jump to this post

@fourof5zs @faithwalker007 The responses from you both echo how I feel. My sister tells me at times how strong I am, how brave I am. Chronic pain is something I have lived with for decades, and I don't have any choice except to work through it in order to survive. Each person is different, each person handles their pain levels in different ways, and each person respects or not how it affects us. For myself I cannot allow the pain to define who I am. Some days are good some days are bad, and I can't look at a calendar in forecast what pain level will be any day. Just as ZeeGee said, how can you say a single number for your overall pain level on a day? I usually stall and say what part of my body are you talking about! I applaud each of us, for researching what may help us, sharing our discoveries, and persevering through it all.
Ginger

REPLY
@gingerw

@fourof5zs @faithwalker007 The responses from you both echo how I feel. My sister tells me at times how strong I am, how brave I am. Chronic pain is something I have lived with for decades, and I don't have any choice except to work through it in order to survive. Each person is different, each person handles their pain levels in different ways, and each person respects or not how it affects us. For myself I cannot allow the pain to define who I am. Some days are good some days are bad, and I can't look at a calendar in forecast what pain level will be any day. Just as ZeeGee said, how can you say a single number for your overall pain level on a day? I usually stall and say what part of my body are you talking about! I applaud each of us, for researching what may help us, sharing our discoveries, and persevering through it all.
Ginger

Jump to this post

I agree with the incredible difficulty of picking a number… any number to describe your current pain level.
It comes down to speaking the same language.
For example, the Lakota (Sioux) word for horse is šúŋkawakȟáŋ which means “big dog.” When the Spaniards brought horses to the Great Plains and introduced them to the Sioux, they had no word for the animal. So they simply used what they already had in their own language and knew and described the new animal that way.
Those Indians who understood Spanish and could speak to the Spaniards in their own tongue did so and translated for the Chiefs and Healing Men to facilitate trade and treaties when possible.

That is what we need to do during these almost impossible times of acquiring much needed pain management due to roadblocks and antagonisms from the government.

Learning the FIRST language of our adversaries and/or reluctant PCPs and Pain Specialists is the most effective way to communicate with them. Alternatively, using your own language but in translated, altered form so whomever you are targeting UNDERSTANDS what you are trying to ask or explain on their level, of sophistication or education without confusion or question.

It is wise to remember that you are the patient and the person who is TECHNICALLY in control of your healthcare. You are the guide and source of care. You pay his bills.
However, your PCP or Pain Specialist is the one in the driver seat. He is who drives the care to more or less relief with your guidance and direction and most of all, honesty.

Speaking their language works. Showing your pain and life struggles work. Don’t get dramatic or “freely.”
Be matter of fact, detailed, and specific with markers they can track and measure. Information they can chart and evaluate.

That is what they understand. It’s not that they are cold and unfeeling. Providers are taught to measure, evaluate, and treat.

REPLY
@faithwalker007

I agree with the incredible difficulty of picking a number… any number to describe your current pain level.
It comes down to speaking the same language.
For example, the Lakota (Sioux) word for horse is šúŋkawakȟáŋ which means “big dog.” When the Spaniards brought horses to the Great Plains and introduced them to the Sioux, they had no word for the animal. So they simply used what they already had in their own language and knew and described the new animal that way.
Those Indians who understood Spanish and could speak to the Spaniards in their own tongue did so and translated for the Chiefs and Healing Men to facilitate trade and treaties when possible.

That is what we need to do during these almost impossible times of acquiring much needed pain management due to roadblocks and antagonisms from the government.

Learning the FIRST language of our adversaries and/or reluctant PCPs and Pain Specialists is the most effective way to communicate with them. Alternatively, using your own language but in translated, altered form so whomever you are targeting UNDERSTANDS what you are trying to ask or explain on their level, of sophistication or education without confusion or question.

It is wise to remember that you are the patient and the person who is TECHNICALLY in control of your healthcare. You are the guide and source of care. You pay his bills.
However, your PCP or Pain Specialist is the one in the driver seat. He is who drives the care to more or less relief with your guidance and direction and most of all, honesty.

Speaking their language works. Showing your pain and life struggles work. Don’t get dramatic or “freely.”
Be matter of fact, detailed, and specific with markers they can track and measure. Information they can chart and evaluate.

That is what they understand. It’s not that they are cold and unfeeling. Providers are taught to measure, evaluate, and treat.

Jump to this post

@faithwalker007 @fourof5zs
Linda and I use the number system as a way for her to tell me to what degree she is suffering at any given time. Its subjective of course. It does not quantify the pain itself, just how bad her experience of the pain is at that moment. I know for example that when she is at what she calls a 4, she generally has more energy, appears like she is suffering less, and that is in fact what she tells me. I almost don't need to ask her her level when it's an 8 or 9. Its obvious just by looking at her body language and her face. It's not a perfect method, but it is a rough way for her to communicate to me how her pain is affecting her in the moment.

REPLY
@jesfactsmon

@faithwalker007 @fourof5zs
Linda and I use the number system as a way for her to tell me to what degree she is suffering at any given time. Its subjective of course. It does not quantify the pain itself, just how bad her experience of the pain is at that moment. I know for example that when she is at what she calls a 4, she generally has more energy, appears like she is suffering less, and that is in fact what she tells me. I almost don't need to ask her her level when it's an 8 or 9. Its obvious just by looking at her body language and her face. It's not a perfect method, but it is a rough way for her to communicate to me how her pain is affecting her in the moment.

Jump to this post

@jesfactsmon @faithwalker Hi Hank and Renee, as far as using numbers to describe pain level, I have reversed that, and now try to estimate my current "comfort level." I use 1-10 as percentages, and I will say, well, today, I feel a number 6, or a 60% comfort level. I used that example because I rarely feel better than a 60% comfort level. Today, I am at about a 70% comfort level, and I have no idea why. Yesterday, I swear, all day, I was at a .001 % comfort level, and just prayed for death all day. There really is no rhyme or reason for my nerves acting the way they do. I can't figure them out any more. I only know if I had a day like yesterday, today, I would probably have called 911, and told them to dope me up with whatever they could to block pain, if it even exsists. Now, today, not so bad. Go figure. I think maybe God is watching over today, as I was in an utter state of despair. Who knows. I give up. LoriRenee1

REPLY
@lorirenee1

@jesfactsmon @faithwalker Hi Hank and Renee, as far as using numbers to describe pain level, I have reversed that, and now try to estimate my current "comfort level." I use 1-10 as percentages, and I will say, well, today, I feel a number 6, or a 60% comfort level. I used that example because I rarely feel better than a 60% comfort level. Today, I am at about a 70% comfort level, and I have no idea why. Yesterday, I swear, all day, I was at a .001 % comfort level, and just prayed for death all day. There really is no rhyme or reason for my nerves acting the way they do. I can't figure them out any more. I only know if I had a day like yesterday, today, I would probably have called 911, and told them to dope me up with whatever they could to block pain, if it even exsists. Now, today, not so bad. Go figure. I think maybe God is watching over today, as I was in an utter state of despair. Who knows. I give up. LoriRenee1

Jump to this post

As much as I would love to talk to my pain specialist like that, she doesn’t understand that. Her scale is 1-10 Pain with 10 being the worst ever felt, 0 no pain at all.
The worst pain I’ve ever felt? I would love to be able to say childbirth, after all I was in labor for 54 hours with contractions 2 minutes apart for better part of 43 hours, but no. The worst pain of my life I set the 10 mark at is the worst Migraine of my life.
It hit without warning—no aura or premonition as I usually have— and my head felt like the right side of it was instantly was being split open with an axe. The pain sliced through my right eye and back toward the back of my head hard as if someone had shoved an ice pick through my skull.
I took my meds— Demerol 50mg and Promethazine 100mg and stretched out in my bed in the dark praying for some relief only for my mouth and face and right arm to instantly begin to buzz and go numb.
I knew nothing was going to stop.
I stumbled out into the brightly lit living room (not realizing not a light was lit and it was dusk), to meet my husband and son and tell them… something.
The rest of the evening is a literal blur.
I remember only bits and pieces: the piercing glare of the ER overhead lights before they went out, the nurse asking for my pain on a scale on 1-… and stopping and answering a 10 on the chart herself and then simply turning to my husband and mumbling something and walking out of the trauma room, and wanting to scream but knowing if I did I wouldn’t be able to stop the nausea from becoming more.
After that I woke up in my own bed and my eighteen year old son was sleeping beside me, holding my hand where he had been for the last three days.
That is my ten.

So when I say an eight or a nine, maybe the doctor or you have a clue to the pain I live with each day.

REPLY
@faithwalker007

As much as I would love to talk to my pain specialist like that, she doesn’t understand that. Her scale is 1-10 Pain with 10 being the worst ever felt, 0 no pain at all.
The worst pain I’ve ever felt? I would love to be able to say childbirth, after all I was in labor for 54 hours with contractions 2 minutes apart for better part of 43 hours, but no. The worst pain of my life I set the 10 mark at is the worst Migraine of my life.
It hit without warning—no aura or premonition as I usually have— and my head felt like the right side of it was instantly was being split open with an axe. The pain sliced through my right eye and back toward the back of my head hard as if someone had shoved an ice pick through my skull.
I took my meds— Demerol 50mg and Promethazine 100mg and stretched out in my bed in the dark praying for some relief only for my mouth and face and right arm to instantly begin to buzz and go numb.
I knew nothing was going to stop.
I stumbled out into the brightly lit living room (not realizing not a light was lit and it was dusk), to meet my husband and son and tell them… something.
The rest of the evening is a literal blur.
I remember only bits and pieces: the piercing glare of the ER overhead lights before they went out, the nurse asking for my pain on a scale on 1-… and stopping and answering a 10 on the chart herself and then simply turning to my husband and mumbling something and walking out of the trauma room, and wanting to scream but knowing if I did I wouldn’t be able to stop the nausea from becoming more.
After that I woke up in my own bed and my eighteen year old son was sleeping beside me, holding my hand where he had been for the last three days.
That is my ten.

So when I say an eight or a nine, maybe the doctor or you have a clue to the pain I live with each day.

Jump to this post

@faithwalker007 I would wager that all of us reach a 10 at some point. And hopefully we don't experience something greater so that we have to re-evaluate our levels and come up with a new pain level of 10. My oncologist's assistant will ask me my pain level overall. And then asked me where I hurt the worst at that moment. Many times it's pretty obvious from my face that there is discomfort somewhere in my body. Most recently I have been suffering severe headaches from the lesions caused by multiple myeloma. There is nothing that will relieve that, and as those who have experienced bad headaches can attest to, nothing seems to relieve it and everything seems to magnify it simply by being contained in the head.

My heart aches for you, just on the experience you related here.
Ginger

REPLY
@faithwalker007

As much as I would love to talk to my pain specialist like that, she doesn’t understand that. Her scale is 1-10 Pain with 10 being the worst ever felt, 0 no pain at all.
The worst pain I’ve ever felt? I would love to be able to say childbirth, after all I was in labor for 54 hours with contractions 2 minutes apart for better part of 43 hours, but no. The worst pain of my life I set the 10 mark at is the worst Migraine of my life.
It hit without warning—no aura or premonition as I usually have— and my head felt like the right side of it was instantly was being split open with an axe. The pain sliced through my right eye and back toward the back of my head hard as if someone had shoved an ice pick through my skull.
I took my meds— Demerol 50mg and Promethazine 100mg and stretched out in my bed in the dark praying for some relief only for my mouth and face and right arm to instantly begin to buzz and go numb.
I knew nothing was going to stop.
I stumbled out into the brightly lit living room (not realizing not a light was lit and it was dusk), to meet my husband and son and tell them… something.
The rest of the evening is a literal blur.
I remember only bits and pieces: the piercing glare of the ER overhead lights before they went out, the nurse asking for my pain on a scale on 1-… and stopping and answering a 10 on the chart herself and then simply turning to my husband and mumbling something and walking out of the trauma room, and wanting to scream but knowing if I did I wouldn’t be able to stop the nausea from becoming more.
After that I woke up in my own bed and my eighteen year old son was sleeping beside me, holding my hand where he had been for the last three days.
That is my ten.

So when I say an eight or a nine, maybe the doctor or you have a clue to the pain I live with each day.

Jump to this post

Renee that story broke my heart. Did it ever happen again? Jen

REPLY
@bustrbrwn22

Renee that story broke my heart. Did it ever happen again? Jen

Jump to this post

Never to that degree again. I've had migraines again and have had to take my meds and close myself in my bedroom and sleep for 2-3 days but thankfully, I've been able to focus through the pain and deal with it. The migraine has never reached an all-consuming mind-numbing level of a 10 as that night.

REPLY

I didn't leave this conversation.. just not much brain to think the past few days. My son, daughter-in-law, three grandchildren here in Georgia.. but not in same town as me and my husband.. . and my brother and his wife out in Washington state have been dealing with having covid. My brother the worse was in the hospital and he had diverticulitis at same time with an abscess. Thankfully he was able to come home Monday evening.

I had gone to my pain specialist and was diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. I had an injection Monday. It was very hard to place a number to pain. It always is. I think because I have had extreme pain.. the worst ever after open abdominal surgery in 2015. I had 3 loops of my intestines come up into my chest.. push my lung against my ribcage.. partially collapsing my lung. Yep, that was painful, but the surgery more painful. I was sliced from sternum to my back just below my left shoulder blade.One rib was cut and one cracked and muscle cut through so the two surgeons could get to everything they needed to for repair.

My ribs are what I judge worse pain by now. They do not hurt as much as they first did after surgery, still most days I feel like I fell down a flight of stairs.. pulling rib muscles and cracking ribs. Yes, I have done that before. That is why I live in a home with no stairs.. no steps really to speak of.. two inches to step up or down anywhere. Sometimes my ribs burn a bit too and that puts them at a 10.. without the burn an 8.

I put this sacroiliac joint dysfunction pain at an 8 and after the injection a 2. Right now a 5. I will take a pain pill in a few minutes and my pain level will go down.

To some degree I probably perceive pain less than most.. at least according to my other half. Some of it is natural and much acquired. I would try to outdo my brother.. the one out in Washington state. He is just 17 months older than I am. He always cried when we got shots when we were children.. I made up my mind I wasn't going to cry over having a shot when I was about 5. He did cry.. but next time he didn't. 😁 My daddy would hurt himself.. bandage up and carry on.. so some of it learned from him. Most of it is just doing the best with whatever comes before me. Crying .. nothing wrong with it. It can release pain. I don't remember it after my 2014 surgery.. the one before the open surgery.. I had a leakage of my intestine and have not much memory of a week, but my husband says I cried with pain and they had to convince me to take some pain medication. My stubbornness abounds.

I am hoping in about 10 days I can report to my pain specialist that this sacroiliac joint dysfunction pain is gone or is at least diminished to a lower level.

Our day tomorrow will be quiet.. a small meal for us two.. and Ziggy (the dog). We will count our blessings.. they are countless.

Wishes for a delightful and happy Thanksgiving to you all.

Zee Gee

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment