Ask the Audiologist webinar

Posted by tonyinmi @tonyinmi, Nov 15 9:27pm

Hearing Loss Association on America, Michigan State Association (HLAA-MI) will be hosting a Zoom webinar panel discussion. The topic is "Ask the Audiologist". You will be able to get answers to your questions.
To participate, people have to first send an email to events@hearingloss-ggr.org to get the Zoom link. They'll then need to register.
Wednesday, Nov 18, from 6:30 PM until 8:00 PM.
Panelists:
Erica Mandrick of Michigan ENT and Allergy
Darcy Jaarsma of Spectrum Health Audiology
Michelle Rankin of Rankin Audiology & Hearing
Kim Kragt of Constance Brown Hearing Centers

ATAP2

To clarify….you will be able to ask your questions and have them answered live. If you are unable to attend, you can also leave questions here for us to ask and we will report back. Your name will be kept anonymous if we ask on your behalf.

Come join us!

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@wired4sound

To clarify….you will be able to ask your questions and have them answered live. If you are unable to attend, you can also leave questions here for us to ask and we will report back. Your name will be kept anonymous if we ask on your behalf.

Come join us!

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@wired4sound Good point. Our audiologists can answer questions regarding hearing health, hearing aids, cochlear implants, and caring for your devices.
Tony in Michigan

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There has been a slight change.

One of our Audiologists is unable to make it due to the new COVID regulations changing her life schedule.

Karson Glass (also from Michigan ENT Allergy) will be subbing in for Erica Mandrick.

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Let's get the conversation started. What kinds of questions are good to ask an audiologist when you go for an appointment? What would you recommend to someone who is going to an audiologist for the first time?

Liked by tonyinmi

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They audiologist should explain the process first..by passing out a written program of what the parts of the test will be…. For example there will be 4 parts to this test…they are as follows….. As a person with profound loss in one ear I sat there for a long time with nothing that I could hear going on…

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Ken82. I agree. All doctors should be better at understanding what we, who don't hear well, need. It's very intimidating to be sitting there wondering what happens next.

Liked by tonyinmi

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If you're comfortable with it, take a family member or friend with you. If you know someone who uses hearing aids successfully, bring that person along. If told you would benefit from hearing aids ask plenty of questions about what they do besides amplify. I'm sure others will chime in here, so will let them suggest questions you might ask.

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@julieo4 In these days of smart phones.. and bluetooth.. remote mics and such… It is important to cover the interaction of those tech devices… It is now a totally different time than when I started with analog hearing aids with replaceable batteries ..

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@ken82

They audiologist should explain the process first..by passing out a written program of what the parts of the test will be…. For example there will be 4 parts to this test…they are as follows….. As a person with profound loss in one ear I sat there for a long time with nothing that I could hear going on…

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@ken82 I agree. Most audiologists do not know what it's like to live with hearing loss. We need to be more assertive on telling them how to better accommodate us. During my last audiologist visit, the audi would be talking to me while my hearing aids were "offline" during a programming sequence. I hear very little without my aids. Before I walked out of there, I suggested that they buy an Android tablet and install the Live Transcribe app. This way, I could read what they were saying when the aids were not working. I followed up with an email with a link to a product that would do the job.
Tony in Michigan

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@tonyinmi Absolutely… I should have pulled out my phone …that has that voice to text app on it…Come to think about it.. I need to do that when ever I go see any doctor… dentist.. even a store clerk..

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@tonyinmi

@ken82 I agree. Most audiologists do not know what it's like to live with hearing loss. We need to be more assertive on telling them how to better accommodate us. During my last audiologist visit, the audi would be talking to me while my hearing aids were "offline" during a programming sequence. I hear very little without my aids. Before I walked out of there, I suggested that they buy an Android tablet and install the Live Transcribe app. This way, I could read what they were saying when the aids were not working. I followed up with an email with a link to a product that would do the job.
Tony in Michigan

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@ken82 That is so ironic that the audi was talking while the aids were "offline". If I were in that situation I would hope I would immediately tell them that I cannot hear sufficiently when "offline". Like Tony said about using a hearing app, I am trying to train myself to have my Otter at the ready for any "professional visit" or when shopping in a store.

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@ken82

They audiologist should explain the process first..by passing out a written program of what the parts of the test will be…. For example there will be 4 parts to this test…they are as follows….. As a person with profound loss in one ear I sat there for a long time with nothing that I could hear going on…

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Hi Ken82….. I really like the idea of the audiologist handing out information in a printed form. It would be nice to know what will be happening at the appointment. Also info about treatment plan and options.
When I first experienced hearing loss 4 years ago I could still hear enough to communicate well with my doctors and audi. Now hearing is much worse and I can't hear much even with the aids. Almost the first thing they ask you to do is take the aids out and then boy, it's a total loss.
Last week when I saw the ENT doctor (now called Head and Neck Department) I took a list of questions that I had printed out….. that went great. He took the time to write down all the answers and wrote down his own questions for me. Spent a lot of time with me but I learned a lot. Tomorrow I have an optometry appt. and I plan to do the same thing. Also my daughter will be with me, she is very thorough and will make sure everything gets answered and I understand it. I would really suggest having someone with you when seeing a doctor. It just makes things so much easier.
My visit with my audiologist last week did not go so well, I did not have my list with me. So I e-mailed her yesterday with a list of questions. That is another option that is working for me so far. Good luck to you! Judy

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@tonyinmi

@ken82 I agree. Most audiologists do not know what it's like to live with hearing loss. We need to be more assertive on telling them how to better accommodate us. During my last audiologist visit, the audi would be talking to me while my hearing aids were "offline" during a programming sequence. I hear very little without my aids. Before I walked out of there, I suggested that they buy an Android tablet and install the Live Transcribe app. This way, I could read what they were saying when the aids were not working. I followed up with an email with a link to a product that would do the job.
Tony in Michigan

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Hi Tony…. I like your assertiveness. I have suggested to my audiologist and my ENT that they set up a short training session for their group and also doctors in other specialties to talk about how to better help those with hearing loss. Maybe bring in one or two people with loss to talk to the group. They all seemed interested but I don't think anything has been done with the idea yet. I will keep bringing it up though.
I found most doctors as well as most hearing folks just don't get it. When I say that I have hearing loss they immediately start talking louder. It's not the volume it's the clarity that is the issue. So yes there needs to be a lot more understand and training. Judy

Liked by barbb

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@judyca7

Hi Ken82….. I really like the idea of the audiologist handing out information in a printed form. It would be nice to know what will be happening at the appointment. Also info about treatment plan and options.
When I first experienced hearing loss 4 years ago I could still hear enough to communicate well with my doctors and audi. Now hearing is much worse and I can't hear much even with the aids. Almost the first thing they ask you to do is take the aids out and then boy, it's a total loss.
Last week when I saw the ENT doctor (now called Head and Neck Department) I took a list of questions that I had printed out….. that went great. He took the time to write down all the answers and wrote down his own questions for me. Spent a lot of time with me but I learned a lot. Tomorrow I have an optometry appt. and I plan to do the same thing. Also my daughter will be with me, she is very thorough and will make sure everything gets answered and I understand it. I would really suggest having someone with you when seeing a doctor. It just makes things so much easier.
My visit with my audiologist last week did not go so well, I did not have my list with me. So I e-mailed her yesterday with a list of questions. That is another option that is working for me so far. Good luck to you! Judy

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Good to see that the written word avoids the mystery meetings.. Most of the time I go to a local Clinic in Central Iowa that is served by Epic for medical records…Mayo also uses Epic, so I am able to email my doctors through the "my Chart" app on my computer or phone. I ask for a printout of each visit record..

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@judyca7

Hi Tony…. I like your assertiveness. I have suggested to my audiologist and my ENT that they set up a short training session for their group and also doctors in other specialties to talk about how to better help those with hearing loss. Maybe bring in one or two people with loss to talk to the group. They all seemed interested but I don't think anything has been done with the idea yet. I will keep bringing it up though.
I found most doctors as well as most hearing folks just don't get it. When I say that I have hearing loss they immediately start talking louder. It's not the volume it's the clarity that is the issue. So yes there needs to be a lot more understand and training. Judy

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@judyca7@tonyinmi Do you know other people with hearing loss who are near you? How about turning assertiveness into advocacy. Instead of asking them to set up a short training session, you and anyone else if available, offer to go talk with their staff about how to be more effective with people with hearing loss. I have various ideas as to subjects you could cover. I am pretty sure the HLAA website has something on health advocacy. If you wanted help with more specific ideas as to a presentation or talk with leadership I could produce some.

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