Art for Healing

Posted by Harriet Hodgson @harriethodgson1, Oct 26, 2018

Kudos to the Montreal Museum of Fine Art for allowing physicians to write prescriptions for free admission to the museum. And kudos to Mayo Clinic for its art program. From the beginning, Mayo Clinic believed that art can uplift patients and foster healing. Whether it’s Rochester, Jacksonville or Scottsdale, Mayo Clinic displays a wide range of artwork for patients. The Rochester site published a brochure for a self-guided tour of artwork. I live in Rochester and every time I’m at Mayo, I take the time to look at the artwork.

We are kindred spirits.

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In reply to @harriethodgson1 "We are kindred spirits." + (show)
@harriethodgson1

We are kindred spirits.

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Yeah, how about that>>>>music too.

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@jenniferhunter

OK, how cool is this? A pediatric surgeon who draws pictures on the bandage dressings for his your patients. I love this and it's a way to help kids feel better about some scary procedures. What a cool doctor! He doesn't think he's an artist, but this is little drawings for healing for kids. https://www.akronchildrens.org/audio_video/725c0260866c4078a0b454986803bbf7-all-dressed-up-dr-robert-parry.html

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Just wonderful @jenniferhunter ! I’ve actually started on some sewing! By hand. I’ll try my sewing machine later today

Liked by lioness

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@jenniferhunter

OK, how cool is this? A pediatric surgeon who draws pictures on the bandage dressings for his your patients. I love this and it's a way to help kids feel better about some scary procedures. What a cool doctor! He doesn't think he's an artist, but this is little drawings for healing for kids. https://www.akronchildrens.org/audio_video/725c0260866c4078a0b454986803bbf7-all-dressed-up-dr-robert-parry.html

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@jenniferhunter I love this doctor! If all doctors cared that much about their patients to do something special it would make a world of difference.
JK

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I wanted to share a story I recently discovered. The Mayo Brothers had a connection with Northwestern in Chicago, and commissioned a portrait of themselves and gifted it to Northwestern. Here is an excerpt and a link to the story.

"The portrait was presented to Northwestern University in 1929, partially in gratitude for an honorary degree of Doctor of Science bestowed to Dr. William Mayo in 1929* and in honor of Dr. Charlie Mayo's Alma Mater (Northwestern University), MD Class of 1888 and MA 1904. Dr. Charlie was awarded an honorary LLD in 1921. For many years there was an annual lectureship in surgery in his name at the medical school. He was recipient of the Alumni Merit Award in 1934 and was a trustee of the University."
https://galter.northwestern.edu/News/return-of-the-mayo-brothers-portrait-to-galter

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@parus, @jenniferhunter,, @healthytoday, @becsbuddy, @veteranspouseinpain, @gingerw, @harriethodgson1, and anyone that I neglected to mention-

My thoughts were turned to this discussion "Art for Healing" and naturally all of you, who have so generously shared some of your art along with the connectedness to your health history. I want to invite you to drop in and tell us how you are doing? Has the recent isolation form the coronavirus affecte your creativity? What have you created lately? What is your inspiration?

As for myself, I have done some sewing and finished a sundress for my grandaughter. She loves it and told me that she gets dizzy when she twirls in it. Today , with shoes and polished toenails, she wore it to church.

Connect Dress cropped

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@rosemarya

@parus, @jenniferhunter,, @healthytoday, @becsbuddy, @veteranspouseinpain, @gingerw, @harriethodgson1, and anyone that I neglected to mention-

My thoughts were turned to this discussion "Art for Healing" and naturally all of you, who have so generously shared some of your art along with the connectedness to your health history. I want to invite you to drop in and tell us how you are doing? Has the recent isolation form the coronavirus affecte your creativity? What have you created lately? What is your inspiration?

As for myself, I have done some sewing and finished a sundress for my grandaughter. She loves it and told me that she gets dizzy when she twirls in it. Today , with shoes and polished toenails, she wore it to church.

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@rosemarya
How beautiful! What a lucky grandbaby to have custom clothing designed and hand crafted by her grandmother.

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@rosemarya

@parus, @jenniferhunter,, @healthytoday, @becsbuddy, @veteranspouseinpain, @gingerw, @harriethodgson1, and anyone that I neglected to mention-

My thoughts were turned to this discussion "Art for Healing" and naturally all of you, who have so generously shared some of your art along with the connectedness to your health history. I want to invite you to drop in and tell us how you are doing? Has the recent isolation form the coronavirus affecte your creativity? What have you created lately? What is your inspiration?

As for myself, I have done some sewing and finished a sundress for my grandaughter. She loves it and told me that she gets dizzy when she twirls in it. Today , with shoes and polished toenails, she wore it to church.

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Rosemarya,
A cute summer dress on your pretty granddaughter. The flowers in the background match the dress.
Wish I had your talent, I could knit and do stitchery, I made plenty of sweaters, and even a few dresses, but the sewing was not a talent of mine.
Funcountess

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@rosemarya

@parus, @jenniferhunter,, @healthytoday, @becsbuddy, @veteranspouseinpain, @gingerw, @harriethodgson1, and anyone that I neglected to mention-

My thoughts were turned to this discussion "Art for Healing" and naturally all of you, who have so generously shared some of your art along with the connectedness to your health history. I want to invite you to drop in and tell us how you are doing? Has the recent isolation form the coronavirus affecte your creativity? What have you created lately? What is your inspiration?

As for myself, I have done some sewing and finished a sundress for my grandaughter. She loves it and told me that she gets dizzy when she twirls in it. Today , with shoes and polished toenails, she wore it to church.

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@rosemarya What a cute little dress and on such a pretty model! Sewing clothes is not my forte. I was a rebel child who flunked home ec. But I do make quilts!

During this time of pandemic and isolation, I have turned to that which offers me solace. Still playing with fabric, making colorful masks rather than quilts. Journaling. My artwork has taken an even more introspective turn as each stroke of the medium is more in focus and more grateful. I find myself moving away from simple black pen to adding colors in, perhaps as a way to bring some levity to an all?
Ginger

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I do miss going to museums at least for now. I was introduced to art therapy and loved it! There is something about the hands and how the brain works when manipulating clay, a brush with paint, pencils, fabric or whatever the medium to create. What a great outlet for healing to take place.

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@jenniferhunter

@harriethodgson1 Wow! I'm so glad you opened this discussion as I've wanted to talk about how important art is for healing and I loved seeing all the art at Mayo. It's kind of like an art museum with some doctor's offices and labs attached and lots more art in the hospitals. I realized that within my own personal experience, I had a lot of resources to help me as a patient. I took my own advice and I used art and music as my therapy to help get past my fears and embrace the surgical treatment that I needed. I am an artist and I was loosing the ability to hold my arms up and control them, and I had worked so hard in my life to achieve that ability. I had long held fears about going through painful tests and surgery, and I was faced with a choice. If my fear made my choices for me, I would have become disabled in a lot of ways, and I would not be able to continue to paint at the level I expected of myself. I also have a biology degree and had worked in research before changing careers to fine art, so I understood medical research that I read, and I understood why I needed spine surgery. When I came to Mayo, I brought one of my own paintings with me to comfort me and give me a place to mentally escape if necessary. I hung it on the wall and looked at it during the nerve tests. I brought it with me when I met my neurosurgeon because I wanted him to understand why getting his help was so important to me. I had already been turned down by 5 surgeons before Mayo because my case was a bit unusual. I brought my camera and asked my surgeon if I could do sketches of him. I told him I needed to like him and this was my way to connect through my art. He liked my art and gladly posed for my camera. I sent him images of my drawings of him. Another painting accompanied me on my surgery day. It was of a trail I had hiked along a creek in Rocky Mountain National Park and I knew it intimately because I had been there and had painted it. Not only did I learn to defeat my biggest fear, but I came through with flying colors. During my recovery, what I wanted to do the most was to paint a portrait of my surgeon, and at one of my follow up appointments, he posed for my camera again and he had a lot of fun doing that. When I came back at my one year follow up, I had a watercolor portrait of him that I painted as a gift. I had to do some rehab to get back my stamina for the physicality of painting. During all of this, music helped me reduce stress and lower my blood pressure. I was measuring it before and after listening to music with deep breathing, and I could drop it significantly. Music also gave my mind a place to go when I was worried. The night before surgery, I was doing my best to loose myself in that painting and the music in my headphones, and in the morning when I met my surgical team I was calm and ready and doing just fine. Coming to Mayo exceeded my expectations and changed my life, and I brought my own creativity as my guide.

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Bravo Jennifer! Thanks for sharing your story.

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@jenniferhunter

Sometimes words are just not enough to say thank you. I am a fine artist. For a couple years, I had been unable to control my brushes and was in constant pain because of spinal cord compression in my neck. I stopped painting because I couldn't produce the quality of work that I expected. I was getting worse and couldn't find a surgeon to help me until I came to Mayo Clinic and met Dr. Jeremy Fogelson. As the days drew closer to my surgery, I had to find a way to be confident and calm, so I used sketching and listening to music to relax. I had been drawing pencil sketches of Dr. Fogelson as my own art therapy to help me on my journey. It helped me get to know him in my own way. I did other things to confront my fears as well, but I always returned to art and music when I needed to escape for awhile. I was calm on my surgery day and everything I did to prepare myself worked like a charm. While I was recovering, I wanted to paint again and to create something for my surgeon. Prior to my surgery, I was loosing what I cherished most, and my surgeon returned that gift to me.

I called his nurse and we arranged for my followup appointment to be on his surgery day, so I could get photos of him in his scrubs. He enjoyed posing for my camera in the exam room for a few minutes and even made me laugh. I had to work out how to match the photos of him with my photos of the Plummer building to make it look believable. I put the history of Mayo behind him with the beautiful carved doors of the historic building, and that was a challenge to draw and paint them in accurate detail.

It took about a month to create this watercolor painting, and I would have to take breaks and lay down to rest when my muscles fatigued. At my one year followup, I hid the finished painting behind the curtain in the exam room until we finished the exam part of the appointment, and then Dr. Fogelson saw this for the first time. It was a complete surprise to him and he loved it. I really painted this for both of us… to say thank you when words were not enough, and to challenge myself to see if I could do it since it had been so long since I had been able to paint. I'm honored to know that he will enjoy this for years to come. I makes me feel good to be able to do this for someone who gave me back the ability to do the job, and knowing how much it meant to him is priceless.

Art has healing power, and creating art takes that one step further for me. I told Dr. Fogelson that there was an emotional side to healing and recovery, and for me that was to overcome the fears that had help me back in my life. Facing major surgery has a way of bringing all of that into focus. This was truly life changing for me in many ways. All of my experiences at Mayo, and my courage are all in that painting. It also represents the talent, the kindness and compassion of my surgeon. At Mayo, medicine is an art. It's also true that art is medicine.

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Simply spectacular!

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@rosemarya

@parus, @jenniferhunter,, @healthytoday, @becsbuddy, @veteranspouseinpain, @gingerw, @harriethodgson1, and anyone that I neglected to mention-

My thoughts were turned to this discussion "Art for Healing" and naturally all of you, who have so generously shared some of your art along with the connectedness to your health history. I want to invite you to drop in and tell us how you are doing? Has the recent isolation form the coronavirus affecte your creativity? What have you created lately? What is your inspiration?

As for myself, I have done some sewing and finished a sundress for my grandaughter. She loves it and told me that she gets dizzy when she twirls in it. Today , with shoes and polished toenails, she wore it to church.

Jump to this post

Hi, @rosemarya Your question about how COVID and isolation is affecting our creativity really made me think that I must get back to doing some sewing! I did just mail off after-swim towels to the grandkids. Hope Ryder likes his shark and Zoe, her mermaid. If I get a photo in return, maybe I’ll post it! I’m currently working on portraits of the kids, but it really takes a lot of brainpower. Here’s Ryder!

6929BD35-08DA-4B97-AF7D-D17BD5C7E4FC

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@becsbuddy

Hi, @rosemarya Your question about how COVID and isolation is affecting our creativity really made me think that I must get back to doing some sewing! I did just mail off after-swim towels to the grandkids. Hope Ryder likes his shark and Zoe, her mermaid. If I get a photo in return, maybe I’ll post it! I’m currently working on portraits of the kids, but it really takes a lot of brainpower. Here’s Ryder!

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Nice portrait of grandson. Do you give the portraits to your family, or do you frame them and keep them?
So many great artists on connect.
If I was not so busy getting house back in order, I’d get my color books out again.
I was a knitter, and needlepoint person. Last night I spent 2 hours looking for some of my finished knit garments, could not find them anywhere, guess they suffered fire/ smoke damage, and were tossed.
Funcountess

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@becsbuddy

Hi, @rosemarya Your question about how COVID and isolation is affecting our creativity really made me think that I must get back to doing some sewing! I did just mail off after-swim towels to the grandkids. Hope Ryder likes his shark and Zoe, her mermaid. If I get a photo in return, maybe I’ll post it! I’m currently working on portraits of the kids, but it really takes a lot of brainpower. Here’s Ryder!

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@becsbuddy When did you have the time to do this painting after your walk? haha Or did you do it while walking haha . Nice picture . Gives me an idea think I'll paint my grandson . If it turns out o.k. I'll post it . See you on the virtual trial

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