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Harriet Hodgson
@harriethodgson1

Posts: 147
Joined: Sep 06, 2017

Art for Healing

Posted by @harriethodgson1, Fri, Oct 26 8:54am

Kudos to the Montreal Museum of Fine Art for allowing physicians to write prescriptions for free admission to the museum. And kudos to Mayo Clinic for its art program. From the beginning, Mayo Clinic believed that art can uplift patients and foster healing. Whether it's Rochester, Jacksonville or Scottsdale, Mayo Clinic displays a wide range of artwork for patients. The Rochester site published a brochure for a self-guided tour of artwork. I live in Rochester and every time I'm at Mayo, I take the time to look at the artwork.

REPLY

@harriethodgson1 How exciting! Art therapy (my own) is what helps me. @gailb is taking an oil painting class and has not painted in years. There are places offering art instruction and learning tutorials online that are free. If nothing else they are fun to watch. One does not need a lot of supplies as a box of crayons is a start. Try YouTubing thus. Thank you for sharing about this.

I have an MA in Art Education and have often wished I earned a degree in art therapy.

@harriethodgson1 Wow! I'm so glad you opened this discussion as I've wanted to talk about how important art is for healing and I loved seeing all the art at Mayo. It's kind of like an art museum with some doctor's offices and labs attached and lots more art in the hospitals. I realized that within my own personal experience, I had a lot of resources to help me as a patient. I took my own advice and I used art and music as my therapy to help get past my fears and embrace the surgical treatment that I needed. I am an artist and I was loosing the ability to hold my arms up and control them, and I had worked so hard in my life to achieve that ability. I had long held fears about going through painful tests and surgery, and I was faced with a choice. If my fear made my choices for me, I would have become disabled in a lot of ways, and I would not be able to continue to paint at the level I expected of myself. I also have a biology degree and had worked in research before changing careers to fine art, so I understood medical research that I read, and I understood why I needed spine surgery. When I came to Mayo, I brought one of my own paintings with me to comfort me and give me a place to mentally escape if necessary. I hung it on the wall and looked at it during the nerve tests. I brought it with me when I met my neurosurgeon because I wanted him to understand why getting his help was so important to me. I had already been turned down by 5 surgeons before Mayo because my case was a bit unusual. I brought my camera and asked my surgeon if I could do sketches of him. I told him I needed to like him and this was my way to connect through my art. He liked my art and gladly posed for my camera. I sent him images of my drawings of him. Another painting accompanied me on my surgery day. It was of a trail I had hiked along a creek in Rocky Mountain National Park and I knew it intimately because I had been there and had painted it. Not only did I learn to defeat my biggest fear, but I came through with flying colors. During my recovery, what I wanted to do the most was to paint a portrait of my surgeon, and at one of my follow up appointments, he posed for my camera again and he had a lot of fun doing that. When I came back at my one year follow up, I had a watercolor portrait of him that I painted as a gift. I had to do some rehab to get back my stamina for the physicality of painting. During all of this, music helped me reduce stress and lower my blood pressure. I was measuring it before and after listening to music with deep breathing, and I could drop it significantly. Music also gave my mind a place to go when I was worried. The night before surgery, I was doing my best to loose myself in that painting and the music in my headphones, and in the morning when I met my surgical team I was calm and ready and doing just fine. Coming to Mayo exceeded my expectations and changed my life, and I brought my own creativity as my guide.

Cheers for you Jennifer! You used your talents and interests to lift you up at a difficult time. I admire your spunk.

@jenniferhunter

@harriethodgson1 Wow! I'm so glad you opened this discussion as I've wanted to talk about how important art is for healing and I loved seeing all the art at Mayo. It's kind of like an art museum with some doctor's offices and labs attached and lots more art in the hospitals. I realized that within my own personal experience, I had a lot of resources to help me as a patient. I took my own advice and I used art and music as my therapy to help get past my fears and embrace the surgical treatment that I needed. I am an artist and I was loosing the ability to hold my arms up and control them, and I had worked so hard in my life to achieve that ability. I had long held fears about going through painful tests and surgery, and I was faced with a choice. If my fear made my choices for me, I would have become disabled in a lot of ways, and I would not be able to continue to paint at the level I expected of myself. I also have a biology degree and had worked in research before changing careers to fine art, so I understood medical research that I read, and I understood why I needed spine surgery. When I came to Mayo, I brought one of my own paintings with me to comfort me and give me a place to mentally escape if necessary. I hung it on the wall and looked at it during the nerve tests. I brought it with me when I met my neurosurgeon because I wanted him to understand why getting his help was so important to me. I had already been turned down by 5 surgeons before Mayo because my case was a bit unusual. I brought my camera and asked my surgeon if I could do sketches of him. I told him I needed to like him and this was my way to connect through my art. He liked my art and gladly posed for my camera. I sent him images of my drawings of him. Another painting accompanied me on my surgery day. It was of a trail I had hiked along a creek in Rocky Mountain National Park and I knew it intimately because I had been there and had painted it. Not only did I learn to defeat my biggest fear, but I came through with flying colors. During my recovery, what I wanted to do the most was to paint a portrait of my surgeon, and at one of my follow up appointments, he posed for my camera again and he had a lot of fun doing that. When I came back at my one year follow up, I had a watercolor portrait of him that I painted as a gift. I had to do some rehab to get back my stamina for the physicality of painting. During all of this, music helped me reduce stress and lower my blood pressure. I was measuring it before and after listening to music with deep breathing, and I could drop it significantly. Music also gave my mind a place to go when I was worried. The night before surgery, I was doing my best to loose myself in that painting and the music in my headphones, and in the morning when I met my surgical team I was calm and ready and doing just fine. Coming to Mayo exceeded my expectations and changed my life, and I brought my own creativity as my guide.

Jump to this post

@jenniferhunter
WOW!! Thank you for sharing this. We all need something to keep us pressing onward.

@jenniferhunter

@harriethodgson1 Wow! I'm so glad you opened this discussion as I've wanted to talk about how important art is for healing and I loved seeing all the art at Mayo. It's kind of like an art museum with some doctor's offices and labs attached and lots more art in the hospitals. I realized that within my own personal experience, I had a lot of resources to help me as a patient. I took my own advice and I used art and music as my therapy to help get past my fears and embrace the surgical treatment that I needed. I am an artist and I was loosing the ability to hold my arms up and control them, and I had worked so hard in my life to achieve that ability. I had long held fears about going through painful tests and surgery, and I was faced with a choice. If my fear made my choices for me, I would have become disabled in a lot of ways, and I would not be able to continue to paint at the level I expected of myself. I also have a biology degree and had worked in research before changing careers to fine art, so I understood medical research that I read, and I understood why I needed spine surgery. When I came to Mayo, I brought one of my own paintings with me to comfort me and give me a place to mentally escape if necessary. I hung it on the wall and looked at it during the nerve tests. I brought it with me when I met my neurosurgeon because I wanted him to understand why getting his help was so important to me. I had already been turned down by 5 surgeons before Mayo because my case was a bit unusual. I brought my camera and asked my surgeon if I could do sketches of him. I told him I needed to like him and this was my way to connect through my art. He liked my art and gladly posed for my camera. I sent him images of my drawings of him. Another painting accompanied me on my surgery day. It was of a trail I had hiked along a creek in Rocky Mountain National Park and I knew it intimately because I had been there and had painted it. Not only did I learn to defeat my biggest fear, but I came through with flying colors. During my recovery, what I wanted to do the most was to paint a portrait of my surgeon, and at one of my follow up appointments, he posed for my camera again and he had a lot of fun doing that. When I came back at my one year follow up, I had a watercolor portrait of him that I painted as a gift. I had to do some rehab to get back my stamina for the physicality of painting. During all of this, music helped me reduce stress and lower my blood pressure. I was measuring it before and after listening to music with deep breathing, and I could drop it significantly. Music also gave my mind a place to go when I was worried. The night before surgery, I was doing my best to loose myself in that painting and the music in my headphones, and in the morning when I met my surgical team I was calm and ready and doing just fine. Coming to Mayo exceeded my expectations and changed my life, and I brought my own creativity as my guide.

Jump to this post

Sometimes words are just not enough to say thank you. I am a fine artist. For a couple years, I had been unable to control my brushes and was in constant pain because of spinal cord compression in my neck. I stopped painting because I couldn't produce the quality of work that I expected. I was getting worse and couldn't find a surgeon to help me until I came to Mayo Clinic and met Dr. Jeremy Fogelson. As the days drew closer to my surgery, I had to find a way to be confident and calm, so I used sketching and listening to music to relax. I had been drawing pencil sketches of Dr. Fogelson as my own art therapy to help me on my journey. It helped me get to know him in my own way. I did other things to confront my fears as well, but I always returned to art and music when I needed to escape for awhile. I was calm on my surgery day and everything I did to prepare myself worked like a charm. While I was recovering, I wanted to paint again and to create something for my surgeon. Prior to my surgery, I was loosing what I cherished most, and my surgeon returned that gift to me.

I called his nurse and we arranged for my followup appointment to be on his surgery day, so I could get photos of him in his scrubs. He enjoyed posing for my camera in the exam room for a few minutes and even made me laugh. I had to work out how to match the photos of him with my photos of the Plummer building to make it look believable. I put the history of Mayo behind him with the beautiful carved doors of the historic building, and that was a challenge to draw and paint them in accurate detail.

It took about a month to create this watercolor painting, and I would have to take breaks and lay down to rest when my muscles fatigued. At my one year followup, I hid the finished painting behind the curtain in the exam room until we finished the exam part of the appointment, and then Dr. Fogelson saw this for the first time. It was a complete surprise to him and he loved it. I really painted this for both of us… to say thank you when words were not enough, and to challenge myself to see if I could do it since it had been so long since I had been able to paint. I'm honored to know that he will enjoy this for years to come. I makes me feel good to be able to do this for someone who gave me back the ability to do the job, and knowing how much it meant to him is priceless.

Art has healing power, and creating art takes that one step further for me. I told Dr. Fogelson that there was an emotional side to healing and recovery, and for me that was to overcome the fears that had help me back in my life. Facing major surgery has a way of bringing all of that into focus. This was truly life changing for me in many ways. All of my experiences at Mayo, and my courage are all in that painting. It also represents the talent, the kindness and compassion of my surgeon. At Mayo, medicine is an art. It's also true that art is medicine.

Jennifer Hunter and Dr Fogelson Portrait watercolor

@jenniferhunter

Sometimes words are just not enough to say thank you. I am a fine artist. For a couple years, I had been unable to control my brushes and was in constant pain because of spinal cord compression in my neck. I stopped painting because I couldn't produce the quality of work that I expected. I was getting worse and couldn't find a surgeon to help me until I came to Mayo Clinic and met Dr. Jeremy Fogelson. As the days drew closer to my surgery, I had to find a way to be confident and calm, so I used sketching and listening to music to relax. I had been drawing pencil sketches of Dr. Fogelson as my own art therapy to help me on my journey. It helped me get to know him in my own way. I did other things to confront my fears as well, but I always returned to art and music when I needed to escape for awhile. I was calm on my surgery day and everything I did to prepare myself worked like a charm. While I was recovering, I wanted to paint again and to create something for my surgeon. Prior to my surgery, I was loosing what I cherished most, and my surgeon returned that gift to me.

I called his nurse and we arranged for my followup appointment to be on his surgery day, so I could get photos of him in his scrubs. He enjoyed posing for my camera in the exam room for a few minutes and even made me laugh. I had to work out how to match the photos of him with my photos of the Plummer building to make it look believable. I put the history of Mayo behind him with the beautiful carved doors of the historic building, and that was a challenge to draw and paint them in accurate detail.

It took about a month to create this watercolor painting, and I would have to take breaks and lay down to rest when my muscles fatigued. At my one year followup, I hid the finished painting behind the curtain in the exam room until we finished the exam part of the appointment, and then Dr. Fogelson saw this for the first time. It was a complete surprise to him and he loved it. I really painted this for both of us… to say thank you when words were not enough, and to challenge myself to see if I could do it since it had been so long since I had been able to paint. I'm honored to know that he will enjoy this for years to come. I makes me feel good to be able to do this for someone who gave me back the ability to do the job, and knowing how much it meant to him is priceless.

Art has healing power, and creating art takes that one step further for me. I told Dr. Fogelson that there was an emotional side to healing and recovery, and for me that was to overcome the fears that had help me back in my life. Facing major surgery has a way of bringing all of that into focus. This was truly life changing for me in many ways. All of my experiences at Mayo, and my courage are all in that painting. It also represents the talent, the kindness and compassion of my surgeon. At Mayo, medicine is an art. It's also true that art is medicine.

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@jenniferhunter thank you for sharing your story and your amazing gift.

@parus

@jenniferhunter
WOW!! Thank you for sharing this. We all need something to keep us pressing onward.

Jump to this post

@parus @jenniferhunter Thank you for underlining something my gut has told me for years. I use my writing, Zentangle, and crafting, along with music, to keep me on an even keel, to heal.
Ginger

Thanks for the like Ginger.

@jenniferhunter

Sometimes words are just not enough to say thank you. I am a fine artist. For a couple years, I had been unable to control my brushes and was in constant pain because of spinal cord compression in my neck. I stopped painting because I couldn't produce the quality of work that I expected. I was getting worse and couldn't find a surgeon to help me until I came to Mayo Clinic and met Dr. Jeremy Fogelson. As the days drew closer to my surgery, I had to find a way to be confident and calm, so I used sketching and listening to music to relax. I had been drawing pencil sketches of Dr. Fogelson as my own art therapy to help me on my journey. It helped me get to know him in my own way. I did other things to confront my fears as well, but I always returned to art and music when I needed to escape for awhile. I was calm on my surgery day and everything I did to prepare myself worked like a charm. While I was recovering, I wanted to paint again and to create something for my surgeon. Prior to my surgery, I was loosing what I cherished most, and my surgeon returned that gift to me.

I called his nurse and we arranged for my followup appointment to be on his surgery day, so I could get photos of him in his scrubs. He enjoyed posing for my camera in the exam room for a few minutes and even made me laugh. I had to work out how to match the photos of him with my photos of the Plummer building to make it look believable. I put the history of Mayo behind him with the beautiful carved doors of the historic building, and that was a challenge to draw and paint them in accurate detail.

It took about a month to create this watercolor painting, and I would have to take breaks and lay down to rest when my muscles fatigued. At my one year followup, I hid the finished painting behind the curtain in the exam room until we finished the exam part of the appointment, and then Dr. Fogelson saw this for the first time. It was a complete surprise to him and he loved it. I really painted this for both of us… to say thank you when words were not enough, and to challenge myself to see if I could do it since it had been so long since I had been able to paint. I'm honored to know that he will enjoy this for years to come. I makes me feel good to be able to do this for someone who gave me back the ability to do the job, and knowing how much it meant to him is priceless.

Art has healing power, and creating art takes that one step further for me. I told Dr. Fogelson that there was an emotional side to healing and recovery, and for me that was to overcome the fears that had help me back in my life. Facing major surgery has a way of bringing all of that into focus. This was truly life changing for me in many ways. All of my experiences at Mayo, and my courage are all in that painting. It also represents the talent, the kindness and compassion of my surgeon. At Mayo, medicine is an art. It's also true that art is medicine.

Jump to this post

@jenniferhunter Hello Jennifer! That painting of Dr. Folgelson is amazing! I bet he was honored to receive that. I love the way you juxtaposed those iconic doors behind him. I too am a fine arts painter. Since my illness; I have lost the creative part of me. I don't know if that will ever return. I have contemplated setting up an official painting studio to see if that would help bring it back. My disease steals most of my energy unfortunately. I am glad that you sought out good help and saved yourself. More than that, you saved your passion.

@windwalker

@jenniferhunter Hello Jennifer! That painting of Dr. Folgelson is amazing! I bet he was honored to receive that. I love the way you juxtaposed those iconic doors behind him. I too am a fine arts painter. Since my illness; I have lost the creative part of me. I don't know if that will ever return. I have contemplated setting up an official painting studio to see if that would help bring it back. My disease steals most of my energy unfortunately. I am glad that you sought out good help and saved yourself. More than that, you saved your passion.

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@windwalker Yes! please do set up an area that can be dedicated for creating of some kind. Knowing that that space is ready for you when you have the energy and the inclination is important. Just remember not to beat yourself up, if that area goes unused for any length of time. Knowing that it is there for you when you're ready may give you the excitement sit, think about a project, then carry it through. I speak from experience; I am finding my groove again after being away from creating things with regularity. Had to tweak where my focus was, and I'm finding that I that there is new energy in me as I use some of what I have to work on creating what my heart is screaming to do.
Ginger

Many thanks for this post Ginger. Finding your way again is a tribute to you.

@windwalker

@jenniferhunter Hello Jennifer! That painting of Dr. Folgelson is amazing! I bet he was honored to receive that. I love the way you juxtaposed those iconic doors behind him. I too am a fine arts painter. Since my illness; I have lost the creative part of me. I don't know if that will ever return. I have contemplated setting up an official painting studio to see if that would help bring it back. My disease steals most of my energy unfortunately. I am glad that you sought out good help and saved yourself. More than that, you saved your passion.

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@windwalker Thank you so much, Terri. Dr. Fogelson was amazed and a bit overwhelmed and his face was pure joy when he saw the painting. It really was a fun appointment, and I wished it didn't have to end. He is a humble man, and he said he was just doing his job. It was his kindness that really helped me, and he liked another painting I brought to my first appointment with him and he said he wouldn't mind having something like that in his house. I said that could be arranged, and we all laughed. I'd never been able to be completely at ease seeing a neurosurgeon until that moment. That's how I started my medical journey with him. I did the sketches of him because I needed that. I only draw or paint what I like, and I needed to play that game with myself to overcome my fears, and it was the beginning of the path to the portrait. Because he was trained at Mayo, I wanted to represent his place in Mayo's history literally, by putting the Plummer building doors behind him. I love those doors and they tell their own stories in the pictures on them, and it gave me a nice setting for his portrait.

I've had lots of days when I'm not at my best either. I go to a painting group at another artist's studio and we work from a live model. That gives me good practice and I find exchanging ideas with other artists helps recharge me and it challenges me and grows my skills. You can also get some artists videos. I enjoy watching them from great painters. There are things that interfere with creativity and responsibilities that get in the way. I do have a room where I paint that really isn't big enough, but I manage. I painted Dr. Fogelson's portrait in my living room because I was recording video of the entire process and needed room to set up the lights and cameras. I do sometimes put on music to paint by which helps me get in the "zone", but when I'm really in the zone and so focused, I don't hear the music at all, and I'm only aware of how much time has passed when I realize how much music I missed. This is music that is so beautiful to me that it can bring me to tears just by listening. I play music too and performed a number of years with a concert band and experienced a lot of really great music.

I think having a dedicated space filled with things that inspire you could help. Make sure you have good lighting. I know I'm affected by the dark days of winter and having LED lights that simulate natural light wavelengths helps me. It's like painting by north light at 5500 k which is bluish (avoid looking directly at them) , and I think that makes me more alert, and the color rendering under this light looks good in any light. I have to stop in the evening or that light stimulation will keep me awake at night. I also go to art museums and study the paintings and figure out how they were done. I look at lots of art online, and again study the paintings I like. Spending time outside helps too and I have a horse that I ride. That is helping my strength and stamina for painting a lot because I lost muscle from my spine problem before my surgery, and it takes years to build it back, and that happens when I exhaust my muscles, and my body responds by adding some bulk. Anything that stimulates your mind creatively can help get you going with your own art. The seed is still there, deep inside, just waiting for nourishment. There's no pressure in trying to produce work unless you put that on yourself. Just practice and don't worry about creating works of art. Have fun and see where it goes. You might surprise yourself.

Plummer door

@parus, I would love to see more of your art work. You haven't posted any for a while. Do you have any nasturtiums? They were my grandmother's favorite flower and I've been thinking about her a lot lately.

@colleenyoung

@parus, I would love to see more of your art work. You haven't posted any for a while. Do you have any nasturtiums? They were my grandmother's favorite flower and I've been thinking about her a lot lately.

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@colleenyoung I had nasturiums in my garden this past summer and have some nice photos that I hope to work from. Attaching my most recent completed drawing.

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