Smart watch to monitor heart

Posted by nene22 @nene22, Apr 3, 2019

I am thinking of getting an Apple watch that can tell when I am in Afib. Has anyone out there had experience with one?

@nene22

I am thinking about getting an Apple watch to monitor Afib. The doctor said I have Afib but I sometimes wonder if I really have it and am hoping that the watch will tell me what is going on. When my blood pressure is taken I never have Afib. I am on a low dose of blood thinner but other medication they put me on caused my kidneys (I also have stage 3 kidney disease) to drop drastically to almost stage 2. Has anyone had experience with the Apple watch? Do I need an Apple phone to get the results?

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Thanks for the additional information @ronbyrd. My symptoms were very similar…happened about 15 minutes into my run, and if I started walking, it would stop. (Strange for a 11 time marathon runner in excellent shape and 53 female). I too had angiogram, cardiac MRI and petscan, and all structurally was very sound. My main concern now is that for some reason, I went into complete heart block about 2 weeks after my angiogram. EP doctor thought I had lyme disease, but test came back negative, so pacemaker was put in. Wondering if anyone has experienced something similar?

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@nene22

I am thinking about getting an Apple watch to monitor Afib. The doctor said I have Afib but I sometimes wonder if I really have it and am hoping that the watch will tell me what is going on. When my blood pressure is taken I never have Afib. I am on a low dose of blood thinner but other medication they put me on caused my kidneys (I also have stage 3 kidney disease) to drop drastically to almost stage 2. Has anyone had experience with the Apple watch? Do I need an Apple phone to get the results?

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Ceepster, its rewarding to connect with someone who has a similar experience even if we both remain in the dark as to why! A detail I wasn't clear on in my previous posts is that, just as you experienced, the PSVT would typically happen about 15 minutes into my run and it would stop when I broke into a walk. However, two months ago I did a moderate-paced 5K with no episodes until the last minute where my Apple watch showed a jump to 140 bpm after being steady around 105 up til then. The 140 lasted for about a minute and stopped with I crossed the finish line, That's the only race I've done in 2.5 years. As background, I ran my first marathon at age 68 and, if I may boost, qualified for and ran the Boston Marathon 2.5 years later, a real thrill. In total, over the last decade I've run about 16 races of which 6-7 were marathons.
Question: What do you mean by "complete heart block"?

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@nene22

I am thinking about getting an Apple watch to monitor Afib. The doctor said I have Afib but I sometimes wonder if I really have it and am hoping that the watch will tell me what is going on. When my blood pressure is taken I never have Afib. I am on a low dose of blood thinner but other medication they put me on caused my kidneys (I also have stage 3 kidney disease) to drop drastically to almost stage 2. Has anyone had experience with the Apple watch? Do I need an Apple phone to get the results?

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I totally agree ronbyrd, you are the first to connect with similar symptoms! Congrats on the Boston Marathon qualifying time…that's AWESOME! 🙂 By complete heart block, I mean a third-degree heart block…it is when electrical signals do not travel between the upper Atrial and lower Ventricle chambers of the heart. My cardiologist sent me to straight to the ER from his office visit…on Valentines Day, no less. While I awaited the lyme disease results over the long holiday weekend, my heart rate dipped to low of 27 in ICU. And they could not get it higher than 38. When I had the pacemaker installed, I felt immediate relief. First 3 months, I have had a lot of transition, but now running 3-4 miles a day, 5 times a week, and no PSVTs.

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@cmensinger

I totally agree ronbyrd, you are the first to connect with similar symptoms! Congrats on the Boston Marathon qualifying time…that's AWESOME! 🙂 By complete heart block, I mean a third-degree heart block…it is when electrical signals do not travel between the upper Atrial and lower Ventricle chambers of the heart. My cardiologist sent me to straight to the ER from his office visit…on Valentines Day, no less. While I awaited the lyme disease results over the long holiday weekend, my heart rate dipped to low of 27 in ICU. And they could not get it higher than 38. When I had the pacemaker installed, I felt immediate relief. First 3 months, I have had a lot of transition, but now running 3-4 miles a day, 5 times a week, and no PSVTs.

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Ceepster: Congrads on successfully getting back into running after what must of been a most scary time dealing with the heart block. I'm still debating with myself as to getting back into running or not. The biggest reason not to is I'm concerned running might cause my PSVT to get worst. The cardiologist left me with saying running might or might not cause deterioration, he can't predict. Oh well. I'll post if I do and have any heart-related events worth noting.

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@nene22

I am thinking about getting an Apple watch to monitor Afib. The doctor said I have Afib but I sometimes wonder if I really have it and am hoping that the watch will tell me what is going on. When my blood pressure is taken I never have Afib. I am on a low dose of blood thinner but other medication they put me on caused my kidneys (I also have stage 3 kidney disease) to drop drastically to almost stage 2. Has anyone had experience with the Apple watch? Do I need an Apple phone to get the results?

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@nene22 I've been using the Apple watch for a while, and it's been useful in step-counting and setting daily movement goals as I've been trying to walk more lately. I'm honestly still getting a grip on it + using it more consistently but it's cool to hear about how receptive it's been for others.

You'll need an iPhone (5s or newer) to pair with the Apple watch during your setup process. Here some more info: https://www.lifewire.com/can-you-use-apple-watch-with-ipad-1994095

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@nene22

I am thinking about getting an Apple watch to monitor Afib. The doctor said I have Afib but I sometimes wonder if I really have it and am hoping that the watch will tell me what is going on. When my blood pressure is taken I never have Afib. I am on a low dose of blood thinner but other medication they put me on caused my kidneys (I also have stage 3 kidney disease) to drop drastically to almost stage 2. Has anyone had experience with the Apple watch? Do I need an Apple phone to get the results?

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I was put on a lifewatch mct monitor two days ago and supposed to wear for 21 days as they just want to check me now. Anyone have experience with any monitors similar to this? How were the results for you good or bad? Thanks

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I am thinking about getting an Apple watch to monitor Afib. The doctor said I have Afib but I sometimes wonder if I really have it and am hoping that the watch will tell me what is going on. When my blood pressure is taken I never have Afib. I am on a low dose of blood thinner but other medication they put me on caused my kidneys (I also have stage 3 kidney disease) to drop drastically to almost stage 2. Has anyone had experience with the Apple watch? Do I need an Apple phone to get the results?

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Looking for recomendations regarding which wrist monitor would be the best for my husband who is 78 years old. I have looked at Apple Watch, Spade and FitBit

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@concretesue

Looking for recomendations regarding which wrist monitor would be the best for my husband who is 78 years old. I have looked at Apple Watch, Spade and FitBit

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Welcome to Connect @concretesue. You will see that I moved your discussion to this related conversation "Smart watch to monitor heart" where members are discussing what type of personal monitors they should use to track their heart. I'd like to share the following website and video https://wiki.ezvid.com/best-heart-rate-monitors
The video in the upper right of the website rates the top 10 heart rate monitors and it looks as though the Apple watch comes in at number 2, only secondary to the Garmin Forerunner 945.

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@nene22

Thanks everyone for your help. The only thing that is stopping me right now is the total cost….watch, phone and then the monthly phone usage charge. They add up.

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nene22. – Apple watches & phones are costly but good from what I read. I bought a Kardia Moble last year. About $90. Simple, accurate, works with my Android. No additional fees. Takes a 60 sec, single lead ekg. Analyzes average BPM with graph & reports: Normal, Afib ,Tachycardia. Two fingers on a small pad to run. Rated 97% accuracy. Was using often and got hell from my doc saying was causing anxiety which is a known afib trigger. Now I use once a month or so for assurance am still in Normal sinus rhythm since don't feel afib. Can usually tell with pluse but the Kardia is re-assuring. Can send to your doc and options for lot of other features, with added fees. I find the basic test meets my needs. Good basic inexpensive device that works well.

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@elwood

nene22. – Apple watches & phones are costly but good from what I read. I bought a Kardia Moble last year. About $90. Simple, accurate, works with my Android. No additional fees. Takes a 60 sec, single lead ekg. Analyzes average BPM with graph & reports: Normal, Afib ,Tachycardia. Two fingers on a small pad to run. Rated 97% accuracy. Was using often and got hell from my doc saying was causing anxiety which is a known afib trigger. Now I use once a month or so for assurance am still in Normal sinus rhythm since don't feel afib. Can usually tell with pluse but the Kardia is re-assuring. Can send to your doc and options for lot of other features, with added fees. I find the basic test meets my needs. Good basic inexpensive device that works well.

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@elwood.. I have a Kardia too and I love it. It sends me a reminder. I showed it to my cardiologist and he approves. When my son in law had afib he emailed the results to his doctor. He no longer has afib after an operation but he still uses it periodically. It's a very inexpensive and good device to have. I also have a fitbit charger which tracks my steps and heart rate. I think I may upgrade that to the new Versa later in the year.

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@amandaburnett

Welcome to Connect @concretesue. You will see that I moved your discussion to this related conversation "Smart watch to monitor heart" where members are discussing what type of personal monitors they should use to track their heart. I'd like to share the following website and video https://wiki.ezvid.com/best-heart-rate-monitors
The video in the upper right of the website rates the top 10 heart rate monitors and it looks as though the Apple watch comes in at number 2, only secondary to the Garmin Forerunner 945.

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Hi Amanda @amandaburnett, Thank you for sharing the video link. I like that it shows what's available to help us track our health as patients. I also have an series 2 Apple watch and got one of the Kardia Mobile devices when they first came out. I later purchased one of the Karia watch bands for the iWatch and use it more than the 2 pad Kardia device. Both of them give me anxiety but I've gotten used to it after the first time it showed me a possible AFib reading. I showed it to my Mayo primary care doc a few years ago and when he first looked at the readout on my iPhone he went to consult the heart doc at the local clinic. After a few minutes they both concluded the EKG was OK even though the reading was showing some quirks. I'm thinking a lot of the funny readings I get are due to my small fiber peripheral neuropathy and using my fingers/thumb to get the EKG. But, I still like seeing the information and I take my BP and EKG every morning at the same time to see if there are differences.

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I finally was able to have my annual exam and labs with my primary care doc and one of things I had written down to discuss with him was the irregular heart beat and low heart rate sleeping. My Apple watch and Kardia app show that I have an irregular heart beat intermittently and PVCs. I told him I've also frequently seen Afib's show up on the app. He scheduled an EKG while I was there to use as a baseline and I have to go to Rochester Mayo Monday for an appointment to connect a 24 hour Holter monitor so they can get a better picture of what might be going on. He thinks I might need a blood thinner but I'm hoping not. I've seen the irregular heart beats since I've had the Apple watch and Kardia app, and on my blood pressure monitor for the last several years but I've never had any physical symptoms where I feel that something is going on. I know it's not a big deal but I'm not looking forward to wearing the monitor while sleeping…yuck.

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@johnbishop

I finally was able to have my annual exam and labs with my primary care doc and one of things I had written down to discuss with him was the irregular heart beat and low heart rate sleeping. My Apple watch and Kardia app show that I have an irregular heart beat intermittently and PVCs. I told him I've also frequently seen Afib's show up on the app. He scheduled an EKG while I was there to use as a baseline and I have to go to Rochester Mayo Monday for an appointment to connect a 24 hour Holter monitor so they can get a better picture of what might be going on. He thinks I might need a blood thinner but I'm hoping not. I've seen the irregular heart beats since I've had the Apple watch and Kardia app, and on my blood pressure monitor for the last several years but I've never had any physical symptoms where I feel that something is going on. I know it's not a big deal but I'm not looking forward to wearing the monitor while sleeping…yuck.

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@johnbishop. I was put on the 24 hour monitor and a two day monitor couple of years ago because sometimes my heart rate would go to peak for a few minutes and then drop back down for no reason usually when I am walking or even doing housework. I never had afib noted on my Kardia. Yes, it is a pain in the you know where to sleep with those monitors. Then out of the blue I had a TIA in January, my cardiologist and my children convinced me to have a loop recorder put in, because to really find out if you have afib or not, you need a continuous monitoring, it may not happen on the days that you have the monitor on. He also put me on blood thinner. I'm not liking it, but if it's that or another TIA or stroke, I don't really have a choice, even though I'm a healthy eater and walks everyday. The loop recorder also let my doctor know if there's any irregular heart rates that's not normal. I've had it for 6 months now, thank goodness no problem has shown up. While I was resistant at first, I have to say it gives me peace of mind. It's so small I don't even feel it. The whole procedure literally only takes a few minutes. There was a little bleeding in the start because of the blood thinner but once the issue was resolved. It was hardly noticeable. Hope the monitor works for you. Take care.

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@mayofeb2020

@johnbishop. I was put on the 24 hour monitor and a two day monitor couple of years ago because sometimes my heart rate would go to peak for a few minutes and then drop back down for no reason usually when I am walking or even doing housework. I never had afib noted on my Kardia. Yes, it is a pain in the you know where to sleep with those monitors. Then out of the blue I had a TIA in January, my cardiologist and my children convinced me to have a loop recorder put in, because to really find out if you have afib or not, you need a continuous monitoring, it may not happen on the days that you have the monitor on. He also put me on blood thinner. I'm not liking it, but if it's that or another TIA or stroke, I don't really have a choice, even though I'm a healthy eater and walks everyday. The loop recorder also let my doctor know if there's any irregular heart rates that's not normal. I've had it for 6 months now, thank goodness no problem has shown up. While I was resistant at first, I have to say it gives me peace of mind. It's so small I don't even feel it. The whole procedure literally only takes a few minutes. There was a little bleeding in the start because of the blood thinner but once the issue was resolved. It was hardly noticeable. Hope the monitor works for you. Take care.

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@mayofeb2020, Thank you for sharing your experience. It's really helpful. Although I've never had any noticeable symptoms it has been a concern in the back my mind and I do really want to find out what's going on. Thanks again.

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