Anyone find that foods listed as "safe" spike your blood?

Posted by Carol, Volunteer Mentor @retiredteacher, May 27, 2017

I found a couple of menus for Diabetic 2 people. I tried them and it was like being poisoned! I have found I cannot eat a skinny bread sandwich with fat free turkey, fat free cheese, and five spinach leaves. I had a few baked chips with it. That was last night and this morning my blood was 155!. So no more sandwiches. I tried cereal with blueberries one night. My blood was again in the 150’s the next morning. Next supper, I ate a salad: lettuce, a small plum tomato, a sprinkle of walnuts, and five mini carrots. I used fat free dressing. My blood was 166! So sandwiches, cereal, salads are out.
The only food that works is roasted chicken breast, and green veggies. No bread, no fruit. Heaven forbid I should eat pasta or rice or a dessert of any kind.
The greens are good, but I have eaten them daily for weeks, and have reached the point that I don’t think I can look another plate of these items without feeling ill. I have been exercising every day, and have lost NO weight. So I don’t understand that. I have seen a dietitian twice because my endocrinologist required it. The little girl (I say that because she was maybe 22 years old and couldn’t answer any questions I had—not too well schooled.) didn’t even have a diet to give me to follow. She had the pat answer: “Eat a diabetes diet, exercise, and check your blood.”
My endo doesn’t agree with the American Diabetes Assoc. So most of my appointment with him is telling me the differences and suggesting medicine I could take. I take no medicine. I am at my wit’s end. I agree with @ihatediabetes. I am totally tired of this disease ruining and ruling my life.
retiredteacher

@brendisha79

Hello @retiredteacher . My name is Brenda and I’m a Type 1 diabetic. I am a health educator at a pediatric hospital and I work in the Weight Management and Diabetes Prevention team. I am also a certified Diabetes Educator. Answering to your post, It has been my experience with my personal diabetes that bread, rice, pasta, potatoes and cereals of any kind spike my blood. I do have to say that although there is much literature about the following, I still have not found anything scientifically proven that when I stress my blood sugar numbers go bonkers! There have been times in my life where I have taken very detailed, honest food diaries and even on the days that I had 0 sugar, if for some reason I had a bad day-my sugar levels were high. So I am a believer in that blood sugar levels will spike on some of us depending on stress levels. I know somewhere in here I should speak on how hormones are the problem but still, like I said before I have not found any REAL evidence that this is a cause other than my own personal experiments. When speaking on sugars: whether it’s in a piece of fruit, your soda or a pastry, sugar is made up of the same two components: fructose and glucose. The molecular structure and composition of sugar molecules is the same no matter where they come from. Neither type of sugar is better or worse for you, but your body processes them differently. Fructose breaks down in your liver and doesn’t provoke an insulin response. Glucose starts to break down in the stomach and requires the release of insulin into the bloodstream to be metabolized completely. The ratios of fructose and glucose are pretty much the same in both fruit and table sugar. Most fruits are 40 to 55 percent fructose (there’s some variation: 65 percent in apples and pears; 20 percent in cranberries), and table sugar (aka sucrose) is 50/50. Don’t get the idea that because the sugar composition is the same in fruit and cake, they’re interchangeable. (Seriously, they’re not.) For one thing, fruit offers good stuff like vitamins, antioxidants and water, while candy and desserts are nutritionally void. Fruit also tends to have less sugar by volume. Half a cup of strawberries: 3.5 grams of sugar. Half a cup of strawberry ice cream: 15 grams. Plus, whole fruit has a lot of fiber, which actually slows down your body’s digestion of glucose, so you don’t get the crazy insulin spike (and subsequent crash) that candy causes. That also means your body has more time to use up glucose as fuel before storing it—as fat. Even dried fruit, a notoriously sugary treat, has all the fiber and nutrients of its plump forbear. But do watch out for dried fruits with added sugar (check the nutrition label), and don’t eat a ton just because they’re smaller. Picture how many pieces are in a handful of raisins compared with a handful of grapes. See what we mean? On average, Americans don’t eat enough fruit, so don’t cut it out of your diet in an attempt to limit your sugar intake! Sugar itself isn’t toxic. But getting too much of it from cookies and cake is.

I could go on and on-but to be honest with you your numbers are not so bad. 155 and 150 are what I would say “semi-safe” for a diagnosed diabetic. You are doing a great job if those are the numbers that alarm you. Oh, and don’t beat yourself exercising. I found that my patients that have a walking routine of 3 to 4 times a week for 20-45 minutes decrease their medicine intake within 6 months. Losing weight is not easy for everyone. Forget working out hard everyday and expecting to see a difference on the scale within 2 weeks-our bodies don’t all work that way. You are beating yourself up and that is why you are frustrated. I totally understand you- your post really came out at me because I could completely relate to everything you were saying. Just know that you are not doing bad at all. Knowing everything that I know, working in the field that I do, I still have those bad-high days. I control it by meditating, walking and just taking a step back to breath. Like I said we are not all the same, every person’s diabetes is different but I hope you read this and find that I too share and can attest to this diabetes. Hang in there-

In Health,

Brenda

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@brendisha79
Hi Brenda:You mentioned “try new alternatives for those foods that may not be so nutritious.” Could you give us one or two examples of how you have done that successfully? Teresa

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@hopeful33250

@brendisha79 I know that with age, our pancreas might not work as effectively. Since you are in-the-know regarding diabetes, I’m just wondering about A1C: does the “acceptable or normal” level rise with age given the aging of the pancreas (and also given no complications such as kidney problems, vision problems or neuropathy)? Teresa

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No, A1C should not rise with age. One of the things that could cause is the continued excess consumption of refined carbohydrates (CHO) after older age which possibly leads to insulin resistance.

-Brenda

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what about fruits

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If i eat small portions of anything every 2 hours my diet is stabilized and bs is about 125 average. I really eat fruit and cottage cheese. Yogurt makes me want to throw up…..for breakfast i usually eat corn flakes with aromia berries or cheerios with aronia berries. ( i grow the berries) aronia berries have about 4 ½ the antioxidents of blueberries. By themselves they are tart but you get ued to them

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@brendisha79

Hello @retiredteacher . My name is Brenda and I’m a Type 1 diabetic. I am a health educator at a pediatric hospital and I work in the Weight Management and Diabetes Prevention team. I am also a certified Diabetes Educator. Answering to your post, It has been my experience with my personal diabetes that bread, rice, pasta, potatoes and cereals of any kind spike my blood. I do have to say that although there is much literature about the following, I still have not found anything scientifically proven that when I stress my blood sugar numbers go bonkers! There have been times in my life where I have taken very detailed, honest food diaries and even on the days that I had 0 sugar, if for some reason I had a bad day-my sugar levels were high. So I am a believer in that blood sugar levels will spike on some of us depending on stress levels. I know somewhere in here I should speak on how hormones are the problem but still, like I said before I have not found any REAL evidence that this is a cause other than my own personal experiments. When speaking on sugars: whether it’s in a piece of fruit, your soda or a pastry, sugar is made up of the same two components: fructose and glucose. The molecular structure and composition of sugar molecules is the same no matter where they come from. Neither type of sugar is better or worse for you, but your body processes them differently. Fructose breaks down in your liver and doesn’t provoke an insulin response. Glucose starts to break down in the stomach and requires the release of insulin into the bloodstream to be metabolized completely. The ratios of fructose and glucose are pretty much the same in both fruit and table sugar. Most fruits are 40 to 55 percent fructose (there’s some variation: 65 percent in apples and pears; 20 percent in cranberries), and table sugar (aka sucrose) is 50/50. Don’t get the idea that because the sugar composition is the same in fruit and cake, they’re interchangeable. (Seriously, they’re not.) For one thing, fruit offers good stuff like vitamins, antioxidants and water, while candy and desserts are nutritionally void. Fruit also tends to have less sugar by volume. Half a cup of strawberries: 3.5 grams of sugar. Half a cup of strawberry ice cream: 15 grams. Plus, whole fruit has a lot of fiber, which actually slows down your body’s digestion of glucose, so you don’t get the crazy insulin spike (and subsequent crash) that candy causes. That also means your body has more time to use up glucose as fuel before storing it—as fat. Even dried fruit, a notoriously sugary treat, has all the fiber and nutrients of its plump forbear. But do watch out for dried fruits with added sugar (check the nutrition label), and don’t eat a ton just because they’re smaller. Picture how many pieces are in a handful of raisins compared with a handful of grapes. See what we mean? On average, Americans don’t eat enough fruit, so don’t cut it out of your diet in an attempt to limit your sugar intake! Sugar itself isn’t toxic. But getting too much of it from cookies and cake is.

I could go on and on-but to be honest with you your numbers are not so bad. 155 and 150 are what I would say “semi-safe” for a diagnosed diabetic. You are doing a great job if those are the numbers that alarm you. Oh, and don’t beat yourself exercising. I found that my patients that have a walking routine of 3 to 4 times a week for 20-45 minutes decrease their medicine intake within 6 months. Losing weight is not easy for everyone. Forget working out hard everyday and expecting to see a difference on the scale within 2 weeks-our bodies don’t all work that way. You are beating yourself up and that is why you are frustrated. I totally understand you- your post really came out at me because I could completely relate to everything you were saying. Just know that you are not doing bad at all. Knowing everything that I know, working in the field that I do, I still have those bad-high days. I control it by meditating, walking and just taking a step back to breath. Like I said we are not all the same, every person’s diabetes is different but I hope you read this and find that I too share and can attest to this diabetes. Hang in there-

In Health,

Brenda

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Ive started using tumeric with my food. Like i said i just started so i dont the results yet but everything i read says it is a must for what ails you

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I have the same problem and here is what i eat. Anything i want only very small portions. Cherries, pineapple,melon for snack….eat every 2 hours

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@maurtura

I have the same problem and here is what i eat. Anything i want only very small portions. Cherries, pineapple,melon for snack….eat every 2 hours

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Forgot nuts… Lots of nuts

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