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Anyone exercising and gaining weight?

Posted by @retiredteacher, May 28, 2017

I promised myself that I would have a perfect month of May with my diabetes. I thought I knew what to eat. I thought I would have blood in range. I thought if I exercised, I would lose weight. Guess what? None of this happened. I obviously ate some wrong food with still doing trial and error. My blood was never consistent–more like a roller coaster. Exercise and lose weight—-not a chance; I gained. I am going to finish the promise I made to exercise every day in May—four more to go. Then I am over that misery since it does nothing. I keep a detailed record of what I eat and there is no correlation. If I eat a salad; blood’s up. If I eat a sandwich, blood’s up. Whatever I eat doesn’t matter. So now, I don’t know anything else to do. I obviously cannot control diabetes; it’s going to kill me, so why even try? I’ve been consumed by this disease since diagnosed over a year ago. I am tired of being addicted to researching and reading and discussing diabetes. For those who can get everything in line, I commend you. I just am not one that anything is going to matter.
retiredteacher

REPLY

@retiredteacher I know how you feel as I’ve been through what you’re experiencing. I’ve had diabetes for 14 years now. I even had bariatric surgery 3 years ago in an effort to get rid of my diabetes –it didn’t work. However, I now take far less insulin than ever before. I couldn’t take metformin because it made me sick. Since my mom died from pancreatic cancer at the age of 78, I didn’t want to take medication that stimulated my pancreas, so I went on insulin about 10 years ago. I have had good and bad luck with it.

I did discover that everything I eat raises my blood sugar at 2-3 hours after eating. That’s normal for everyone even if you don’t have diabetes. The difference is that our blood sugar rises much higher in diabetes than normal. I discovered over the years that ANY carbohydrates I eat make my blood sugar spike high. I limit my carbohydrates to no more than 15 grams each meal or snack. For snacks I try to only eat nuts, fresh fruit (primarily strawberries, blueberries, or other fresh fruit) and have 1 cup or 15 grams only. My favorite snack is 1/2cup of 4% cottage cheese with 1/2cup of strawberries/blueberries, and 1 packet of Splenda. I try to have a protein and fat with each snack if it includes carbohydrates. I have found that Nature Valley Almond Nut Crunch bars make an almost perfect snack for me. For meals I eat 3-4 oz of protein, and 4 oz of carbs (vegies with pasta or potatoes, rice or quinoa. I also only eat 1 to 1 1/2 cups of food at each meal due to my RnY bariatric surgery. I have lost 80 pounds due to the surgery, and I have maintained that loss.

Don’t give up! You are making a major life change to a lifestyle that you spent many your entire life developing. Why would you only give yourself a year to change those ways of life? I have found that being more gentle with myself and having more reasonable expectations of what I actually control helped me as I accepted this new life. Yes, it can be frustrating when things don’t seem to work or you are surprised by sudden spikes, or not losing weight. However, I learned to let go of those times and continue with my eyes on the prize, which for me is an A1c level of 6.5. My A1c runs high consistently at 7.2 or 7.4, with an occasional 8.6 when changing medications. Also, I’m 68 years old now and my doctor says A1c levels rise naturally as we age. So far I’m lucky that I haven’t had complications from my diabetes.

You will learn to live within the limitations of the disease, but it takes time. Actually, it forced me to live a much healthier life. I really don’t like candy bars or anything that is overly sweet anymore. I prefer fresh fruit when i want something sweet. I don’t drink any soda pop or carbonated beverages. I only drink water, coffee, or tea. Occasionally I will drink 8 oz of my grandson’s sugar free kool aid with ice. I feel MUCH better than I did before I knew I had diabetes. Now, if I’m groggy I know it’s because I’ve had too many carbohydrates and I need to check my glucose levels and go for a walk if they are high, but not over 230. If I’m shakey and sweaty and feel a need to pee, my blood sugar is too low and I need to check it and then eat a 15 gr snack every 15 minutes until I am at 105 to 120 readings on my meter. My tendency was to eat too much sweet stuff when my sugar was low, and then i was on a roller coaster ride all day. I no longer do that as I’ve learned that I’m not going to die from low blood sugar that I am aware of as long as I can raise it reasonably.

I hope my experience with diabetes is helpful for you. It really only restricts your eating habits. You can live a full and joyful life with it. It will teach you the first of many lessons of learning to let go of feeling in control of everything. Even though you have a lot of control, you’re not in complete control of anything. As you age, the letting go continues, and it can be hard to do. But, each thing you can let go frees your energy for new adventures in life.

@gailb

@retiredteacher I know how you feel as I’ve been through what you’re experiencing. I’ve had diabetes for 14 years now. I even had bariatric surgery 3 years ago in an effort to get rid of my diabetes –it didn’t work. However, I now take far less insulin than ever before. I couldn’t take metformin because it made me sick. Since my mom died from pancreatic cancer at the age of 78, I didn’t want to take medication that stimulated my pancreas, so I went on insulin about 10 years ago. I have had good and bad luck with it.

I did discover that everything I eat raises my blood sugar at 2-3 hours after eating. That’s normal for everyone even if you don’t have diabetes. The difference is that our blood sugar rises much higher in diabetes than normal. I discovered over the years that ANY carbohydrates I eat make my blood sugar spike high. I limit my carbohydrates to no more than 15 grams each meal or snack. For snacks I try to only eat nuts, fresh fruit (primarily strawberries, blueberries, or other fresh fruit) and have 1 cup or 15 grams only. My favorite snack is 1/2cup of 4% cottage cheese with 1/2cup of strawberries/blueberries, and 1 packet of Splenda. I try to have a protein and fat with each snack if it includes carbohydrates. I have found that Nature Valley Almond Nut Crunch bars make an almost perfect snack for me. For meals I eat 3-4 oz of protein, and 4 oz of carbs (vegies with pasta or potatoes, rice or quinoa. I also only eat 1 to 1 1/2 cups of food at each meal due to my RnY bariatric surgery. I have lost 80 pounds due to the surgery, and I have maintained that loss.

Don’t give up! You are making a major life change to a lifestyle that you spent many your entire life developing. Why would you only give yourself a year to change those ways of life? I have found that being more gentle with myself and having more reasonable expectations of what I actually control helped me as I accepted this new life. Yes, it can be frustrating when things don’t seem to work or you are surprised by sudden spikes, or not losing weight. However, I learned to let go of those times and continue with my eyes on the prize, which for me is an A1c level of 6.5. My A1c runs high consistently at 7.2 or 7.4, with an occasional 8.6 when changing medications. Also, I’m 68 years old now and my doctor says A1c levels rise naturally as we age. So far I’m lucky that I haven’t had complications from my diabetes.

You will learn to live within the limitations of the disease, but it takes time. Actually, it forced me to live a much healthier life. I really don’t like candy bars or anything that is overly sweet anymore. I prefer fresh fruit when i want something sweet. I don’t drink any soda pop or carbonated beverages. I only drink water, coffee, or tea. Occasionally I will drink 8 oz of my grandson’s sugar free kool aid with ice. I feel MUCH better than I did before I knew I had diabetes. Now, if I’m groggy I know it’s because I’ve had too many carbohydrates and I need to check my glucose levels and go for a walk if they are high, but not over 230. If I’m shakey and sweaty and feel a need to pee, my blood sugar is too low and I need to check it and then eat a 15 gr snack every 15 minutes until I am at 105 to 120 readings on my meter. My tendency was to eat too much sweet stuff when my sugar was low, and then i was on a roller coaster ride all day. I no longer do that as I’ve learned that I’m not going to die from low blood sugar that I am aware of as long as I can raise it reasonably.

I hope my experience with diabetes is helpful for you. It really only restricts your eating habits. You can live a full and joyful life with it. It will teach you the first of many lessons of learning to let go of feeling in control of everything. Even though you have a lot of control, you’re not in complete control of anything. As you age, the letting go continues, and it can be hard to do. But, each thing you can let go frees your energy for new adventures in life.

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Thanks @gailb you have offered some good information for @retiredteacher and the rest of us about diet for diabetes! I also like your philosophical comments, “You can live a full and joyful life with it. It will teach you the first of many lessons of learning to let go of feeling in control of everything. Even though you have a lot of control, you’re not in complete control of anything. As you age, the letting go continues, and it can be hard to do. But, each thing you can let go frees your energy for new adventures in life.” Also, “I have found that being more gentle with myself and having more reasonable expectations of what I actually control helped me as I accepted this new life. Yes, it can be frustrating when things don’t seem to work or you are surprised by sudden spikes, or not losing weight.” That is so true about the aging process and the need to be gentle with ourselves. Great thoughts – thanks for sharing your experiences with us all! Teresa

@gailb

@retiredteacher I know how you feel as I’ve been through what you’re experiencing. I’ve had diabetes for 14 years now. I even had bariatric surgery 3 years ago in an effort to get rid of my diabetes –it didn’t work. However, I now take far less insulin than ever before. I couldn’t take metformin because it made me sick. Since my mom died from pancreatic cancer at the age of 78, I didn’t want to take medication that stimulated my pancreas, so I went on insulin about 10 years ago. I have had good and bad luck with it.

I did discover that everything I eat raises my blood sugar at 2-3 hours after eating. That’s normal for everyone even if you don’t have diabetes. The difference is that our blood sugar rises much higher in diabetes than normal. I discovered over the years that ANY carbohydrates I eat make my blood sugar spike high. I limit my carbohydrates to no more than 15 grams each meal or snack. For snacks I try to only eat nuts, fresh fruit (primarily strawberries, blueberries, or other fresh fruit) and have 1 cup or 15 grams only. My favorite snack is 1/2cup of 4% cottage cheese with 1/2cup of strawberries/blueberries, and 1 packet of Splenda. I try to have a protein and fat with each snack if it includes carbohydrates. I have found that Nature Valley Almond Nut Crunch bars make an almost perfect snack for me. For meals I eat 3-4 oz of protein, and 4 oz of carbs (vegies with pasta or potatoes, rice or quinoa. I also only eat 1 to 1 1/2 cups of food at each meal due to my RnY bariatric surgery. I have lost 80 pounds due to the surgery, and I have maintained that loss.

Don’t give up! You are making a major life change to a lifestyle that you spent many your entire life developing. Why would you only give yourself a year to change those ways of life? I have found that being more gentle with myself and having more reasonable expectations of what I actually control helped me as I accepted this new life. Yes, it can be frustrating when things don’t seem to work or you are surprised by sudden spikes, or not losing weight. However, I learned to let go of those times and continue with my eyes on the prize, which for me is an A1c level of 6.5. My A1c runs high consistently at 7.2 or 7.4, with an occasional 8.6 when changing medications. Also, I’m 68 years old now and my doctor says A1c levels rise naturally as we age. So far I’m lucky that I haven’t had complications from my diabetes.

You will learn to live within the limitations of the disease, but it takes time. Actually, it forced me to live a much healthier life. I really don’t like candy bars or anything that is overly sweet anymore. I prefer fresh fruit when i want something sweet. I don’t drink any soda pop or carbonated beverages. I only drink water, coffee, or tea. Occasionally I will drink 8 oz of my grandson’s sugar free kool aid with ice. I feel MUCH better than I did before I knew I had diabetes. Now, if I’m groggy I know it’s because I’ve had too many carbohydrates and I need to check my glucose levels and go for a walk if they are high, but not over 230. If I’m shakey and sweaty and feel a need to pee, my blood sugar is too low and I need to check it and then eat a 15 gr snack every 15 minutes until I am at 105 to 120 readings on my meter. My tendency was to eat too much sweet stuff when my sugar was low, and then i was on a roller coaster ride all day. I no longer do that as I’ve learned that I’m not going to die from low blood sugar that I am aware of as long as I can raise it reasonably.

I hope my experience with diabetes is helpful for you. It really only restricts your eating habits. You can live a full and joyful life with it. It will teach you the first of many lessons of learning to let go of feeling in control of everything. Even though you have a lot of control, you’re not in complete control of anything. As you age, the letting go continues, and it can be hard to do. But, each thing you can let go frees your energy for new adventures in life.

Jump to this post

@hopeful33250 Thanks for your feedback. Lest anyone think I do all these things all the time, I need to let you know that I’m very imperfect. I often fail and I’m not always gentle with myself when I do. I keep working on it though and thats what counts in the long run.

@gailb

@retiredteacher I know how you feel as I’ve been through what you’re experiencing. I’ve had diabetes for 14 years now. I even had bariatric surgery 3 years ago in an effort to get rid of my diabetes –it didn’t work. However, I now take far less insulin than ever before. I couldn’t take metformin because it made me sick. Since my mom died from pancreatic cancer at the age of 78, I didn’t want to take medication that stimulated my pancreas, so I went on insulin about 10 years ago. I have had good and bad luck with it.

I did discover that everything I eat raises my blood sugar at 2-3 hours after eating. That’s normal for everyone even if you don’t have diabetes. The difference is that our blood sugar rises much higher in diabetes than normal. I discovered over the years that ANY carbohydrates I eat make my blood sugar spike high. I limit my carbohydrates to no more than 15 grams each meal or snack. For snacks I try to only eat nuts, fresh fruit (primarily strawberries, blueberries, or other fresh fruit) and have 1 cup or 15 grams only. My favorite snack is 1/2cup of 4% cottage cheese with 1/2cup of strawberries/blueberries, and 1 packet of Splenda. I try to have a protein and fat with each snack if it includes carbohydrates. I have found that Nature Valley Almond Nut Crunch bars make an almost perfect snack for me. For meals I eat 3-4 oz of protein, and 4 oz of carbs (vegies with pasta or potatoes, rice or quinoa. I also only eat 1 to 1 1/2 cups of food at each meal due to my RnY bariatric surgery. I have lost 80 pounds due to the surgery, and I have maintained that loss.

Don’t give up! You are making a major life change to a lifestyle that you spent many your entire life developing. Why would you only give yourself a year to change those ways of life? I have found that being more gentle with myself and having more reasonable expectations of what I actually control helped me as I accepted this new life. Yes, it can be frustrating when things don’t seem to work or you are surprised by sudden spikes, or not losing weight. However, I learned to let go of those times and continue with my eyes on the prize, which for me is an A1c level of 6.5. My A1c runs high consistently at 7.2 or 7.4, with an occasional 8.6 when changing medications. Also, I’m 68 years old now and my doctor says A1c levels rise naturally as we age. So far I’m lucky that I haven’t had complications from my diabetes.

You will learn to live within the limitations of the disease, but it takes time. Actually, it forced me to live a much healthier life. I really don’t like candy bars or anything that is overly sweet anymore. I prefer fresh fruit when i want something sweet. I don’t drink any soda pop or carbonated beverages. I only drink water, coffee, or tea. Occasionally I will drink 8 oz of my grandson’s sugar free kool aid with ice. I feel MUCH better than I did before I knew I had diabetes. Now, if I’m groggy I know it’s because I’ve had too many carbohydrates and I need to check my glucose levels and go for a walk if they are high, but not over 230. If I’m shakey and sweaty and feel a need to pee, my blood sugar is too low and I need to check it and then eat a 15 gr snack every 15 minutes until I am at 105 to 120 readings on my meter. My tendency was to eat too much sweet stuff when my sugar was low, and then i was on a roller coaster ride all day. I no longer do that as I’ve learned that I’m not going to die from low blood sugar that I am aware of as long as I can raise it reasonably.

I hope my experience with diabetes is helpful for you. It really only restricts your eating habits. You can live a full and joyful life with it. It will teach you the first of many lessons of learning to let go of feeling in control of everything. Even though you have a lot of control, you’re not in complete control of anything. As you age, the letting go continues, and it can be hard to do. But, each thing you can let go frees your energy for new adventures in life.

Jump to this post

@gailb Yes, I understand exactly what you mean. You do have a great mind-set, though, for dealing with change and it provides inspiration for others. While each of us have times of “less-than-perfect thinking,” you do set an example of some core values, if you will, in dealing with changing circumstances in life. Thanks again! Teresa

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

@rosemarya

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

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@rosemarya, I bought the Mayo Clinic books when I was diagnosed, signed up for the daily commentary and the newsletter, so I get everything Mayo has available. I understand terms and food and portions and the point of what Mayo is all about, but that didn’t help me come up with meals that are edible for me and my husband. We were born and raised in the deep South, so a near vegetarian diet is not satisfying to him. I am not a cook. When I was diagnosed, the endo told me (and I read) to prepare all of my food and not eat out. I didn’t even know where to start and still don’t. Trying to cook just frustrates me. So all the Mayo info in the world is not going to help me satisfy diabetes and is also what my husband wants to eat. At 73 years old, it’s a little late to become a chef. Cooking a regular meal is not in my wheelhouse. Food has become a big conflict, and we’ve been married over fifty years. Every day is food misery.
I appreciate your response. Thanks for the link. I have all of that info and have read it.
retired teacher

@retiredteacher I understand now, southern cooking is definitely not diabetic-friendly. One side of my family is from the south (the other side from Canada) so I know how southern cooking goes – lots of food, lots of fried foods and lots of good pies, etc. You do face a special problem with cooking and preparing meals. Thanks for letting us know about your specific problem with food and cooking. Perhaps others can join in the conversation and help with some menu ideas that won’t take up a lot of time and would be tasty to a southern palate. Teresa

@rosemarya

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

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@retiredteacher, I know that my husband would love to come by your house for dinner! His mom was a wonderful southern cook; she made the best fried chicken and pies and cakes.
Cooking two meals is hard. I have learned to fill half of my plate with a ‘healthy’ item, and then I can have a small taste of what my husband is eating. That way I don’t feel as if I’m depriving myself. It also helps that we both are agreeable to leftovers, and that eases the load. He does not like to cook at all.
Please don’t give up trying to control your blood sugars. I only had a brief stint of prednisone induced diabetes immediately after my organ transplant. And I remember how crazy the numbers were if I forgot, and ate a piece of candy. And from hearing from others with diabetes, it is a very personal thing to control. Maybe a month is not enough time to get control of your eating habits.
How long until you have a medical check-up to follow up or monitor your condition?.
Rosemary

Besides not being a cook, I’ve had Southern cooking all our lives, but I didn’t cook. We had a maid who did all the cooking. My job was to get an education and be a lady. My friends were the same. All of us grew up that way. So I never learned to cook and never wanted to. At age 73 it’s a little too late now. Every way I turn, diabetes throws up a brick wall, and it’s like being locked up in a cage.
I just see it as hopeless, and I apologize for not being accepting of my situation.
retiredteacher

@retiredteacher

Besides not being a cook, I’ve had Southern cooking all our lives, but I didn’t cook. We had a maid who did all the cooking. My job was to get an education and be a lady. My friends were the same. All of us grew up that way. So I never learned to cook and never wanted to. At age 73 it’s a little too late now. Every way I turn, diabetes throws up a brick wall, and it’s like being locked up in a cage.
I just see it as hopeless, and I apologize for not being accepting of my situation.
retiredteacher

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@retiredteacher, You have been dealt a complicated situation. I want to say that I admire your strength in looking for help in dealing with this. You are not alone, as we are hearing more and more every day about the rise of diabetes in the population, at all ages. I am going to expect that you will be receiving some more replies.. So, hang in there, take one step at a time, and keep trying.

By the way, you are a retired teacher – so, I have to believe that you have a real strong character and a stamina for “getting it done”. What would you tell a student who was experiencing this same situation? How would you encourage him/her?
Rosemary

@rosemarya

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

Jump to this post

He wouldn’t want to come to my house. The main problem is that I am not a cook, so if he came to my house, he’d get nothing but maybe a piece of oven chicken breast or bland broccoli and squash. I can’t cook one good meal much less two.
My fasting blood is this Wednesday and then the following Monday I see the endo. I go when I’m supposed to but there are few suggestions except he wants to throw pills at the problem, and I am not a pill taker.
retiredteacher

@rosemarya

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

Jump to this post

@retiredteacher , Dear sister retired teacher, here is a recipe secret; Mrs Dash Seasoning sprinkled on that chicken will perk it up. Add a sprinkle of parmesan cheese, or lemon juice on those veggies! And I have become a lover of cinnamon, too.
Good luck on Wed and Monday.
You sound like so many of my teacher friends about the medicine hesitancy. Let’s face it, these doctors have MD after their name for a reason. I like to think that they have done considerable studying about diseases and possible treatments. When our own body does not respond to our own efforts, medicines (prescribed and monitored) can be life changing. One idea is to try them for a period of time (he can give you a suggested period to see if they are working) What do you have to lose?
Hugs,
Rosemary

@rosemarya

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

Jump to this post

It may be true that having MD makes them more knowledgeable than their patients, but I am not convinced when they can’t answer questions I have researched. I understand from teaching what beating around the bush means. Before I take anything, I research it and talk to my pharmacist; they know more than the doctors.
The last medicine the endo gave me was for blood pressure. Almost immediately my hair started falling out and I slept almost all day. My hair stylist told me something was wrong. I researched the medicine on more sites and found hair loss and extreme fatigue as side effects. I sent the endo an email that I quit taking the med and why. My stylist says the hair will not grow back, so things just get worse.
I’ve read on this site testimony from people who became very ill from metformin. That was the first thing this endo wanted to do—give me metformin. I said I would not take it, and he admitted it did make people sick.
I am not going to take something just because a dr. says to. They don’t know all the side effects. That’s just the way it is.
By the way I have a cabinet filled with just about every Mrs. Dash. It’s better than nothing but it isn’t the real thing.
retired teacher

@rosemarya

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

Jump to this post

@retiredteacher, I am glad that you have a good pharmacist who knows you that you can talk to directly about your concerns.
Keep in touch and let us know how you are doing.
Rosemary

@rosemarya

@retiredteacher, Welcome, I too am a retired teacher!! IT is a pleasure to meet you.
Here is a link to Mayo Clinic information about diet with diabetes. Maybe you can find something helpful here.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

Gotta run. I’ll check in later.
Rosemary

Jump to this post

@retiredteacher A good way to make veggies more tasty (and tolerable) are to roast them. I like to use this method because it is easy to do and requires little effort but tastes much better than bland broccoli or squash. This is what I do: I take some veggies that I have in the refrigerator and (I soften the really tough ones in a microwave for a minute of two), add carrots, sweet onion, perhaps a little garlic juice and and place it all in aluminum foil, drizzle with olive oil (you can also add some Mrs. Dash to the mix). Sometimes I even add a small, new potato (or part of a sweet potato) cut into small pieces. Then roast in the oven for 20 minutes or so at 400 degrees until the veggies are tender. It really turns out nicely and the effort is minimal. You can use whatever assortment of veggies that you have on hand. Teresa

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