Answering Questions: Odd Sensation in My Legs, No Significant Pain

Posted by klro0001 @klro0001, Sun, Sep 29 7:42am

Hello. I am currently experiencing odd sensations in my legs but no significant pain. EMG and NCV tests are scheduled for October 17th. I haven’t shared what’s going on with me with anyone but my husband. Partially because I don’t know what to share since I don’t have an official diagnosis. Partially because I’m not ready to accept that there may be something seriously wrong. Anyway, my husband keeps asking me if I’m okay. I don’t really know how to answer that question. Emotionally, I’m anxious and scared. Physically, I know there’s something wrong so I guess that means I’m not okay. Has anyone else found it difficult to discuss your condition with loved ones? If so, how did you handle it? I appreciate any advice.

Hi @klro0001, I think being anxious and scared are pretty normal when it comes to knowing something is wrong with you and you don't know what it is. Also, waiting for a diagnosis adds to the anxiety. I can share that I have felt the same way and I have a wife like your husband that is concerned and wants to help and support me. I consider it a blessing to be able to have someone who will listen and you can share your concerns with them. It doesn't make it easy though.

One of the things that I think might be helpful is to discuss your concerns with your doctor to see what they might think the issue is and what they are trying to confirm with their tests. Have you had a chance to discuss your concerns with your doctor?

Here's a video of your upcoming tests that may help answer some of your questions and concerns.

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Hi Klro0001, I can totally relate, having gone through what you are now experiencing. I think that sharing what you are going through with your husband will at least make you feel that you are not totally alone with this new scary health issue. Even if someone is not emotionally supportive, just talking to someone even if you don't know what is happening will help your anxiety levels. Try to stay positive until you have some answers, whatever you are experiencing could just be temporary. Wishing you the best. Helen

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@johnbishop

Hi @klro0001, I think being anxious and scared are pretty normal when it comes to knowing something is wrong with you and you don't know what it is. Also, waiting for a diagnosis adds to the anxiety. I can share that I have felt the same way and I have a wife like your husband that is concerned and wants to help and support me. I consider it a blessing to be able to have someone who will listen and you can share your concerns with them. It doesn't make it easy though.

One of the things that I think might be helpful is to discuss your concerns with your doctor to see what they might think the issue is and what they are trying to confirm with their tests. Have you had a chance to discuss your concerns with your doctor?

Here's a video of your upcoming tests that may help answer some of your questions and concerns.

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I think I’m having some weird reaction to a nerve block that I received for a bunion surgery. I spoke with my surgeon, PCP, and neurologist. Just waiting for the tests at this point.

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@helennicola

Hi Klro0001, I can totally relate, having gone through what you are now experiencing. I think that sharing what you are going through with your husband will at least make you feel that you are not totally alone with this new scary health issue. Even if someone is not emotionally supportive, just talking to someone even if you don't know what is happening will help your anxiety levels. Try to stay positive until you have some answers, whatever you are experiencing could just be temporary. Wishing you the best. Helen

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Thank you. He’s very supportive. I think I’m just trying to put on a brave face. I don’t want to scare or worry him. But, you’re right. I should express my thought and feelings. Thanks for the advice.

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@kiro0001, Good morning. You have great helpers here in @johnbishop and @helennicola. There is not much for me to add except that I have had those tests several times in my life. They are getting easier to handle these days. Here's my question. Will your husband be going with you and will he be in the room with you? My life partner went with me to the neurologist's appointment. That was so perfect. Why? I didn't have to tell him. The technicians and neurologist included him in the entire process. What that does is make the tests and their results a shared experience. We now attend every medical appointment or treatment together. He calls us "health buddies".

If you are a student of mindfulness, then my next suggestion will be an easy one for you. Stay in the present. The past is over and the future has not happened. Worrying, predicting outcomes and waiting for answers is in the future. See if you can limit the time you spend with the future since it is unknown at this time. The what-if game……is not an emotionally healthy place to stay for any length of time.

And finally, sharing with your husband will have a chance at the best outcome when we answer the following mindfulness questions…..is what you want to share with your husband true? Is it nice? Is it necessary?

If I am being honest with myself, I will acknowledge that I went through most of my health issues alone because I thought my ex-husband wouldn't want me anymore. There are a lot of cultural concepts that make women feel unworthy unless they are totally healthy and doing everything they are expected to do. May you be safe and protected today. Check-in after the October 17th tests. All three of us, John, Helen and I will be here for you.

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@artscaping

@kiro0001, Good morning. You have great helpers here in @johnbishop and @helennicola. There is not much for me to add except that I have had those tests several times in my life. They are getting easier to handle these days. Here's my question. Will your husband be going with you and will he be in the room with you? My life partner went with me to the neurologist's appointment. That was so perfect. Why? I didn't have to tell him. The technicians and neurologist included him in the entire process. What that does is make the tests and their results a shared experience. We now attend every medical appointment or treatment together. He calls us "health buddies".

If you are a student of mindfulness, then my next suggestion will be an easy one for you. Stay in the present. The past is over and the future has not happened. Worrying, predicting outcomes and waiting for answers is in the future. See if you can limit the time you spend with the future since it is unknown at this time. The what-if game……is not an emotionally healthy place to stay for any length of time.

And finally, sharing with your husband will have a chance at the best outcome when we answer the following mindfulness questions…..is what you want to share with your husband true? Is it nice? Is it necessary?

If I am being honest with myself, I will acknowledge that I went through most of my health issues alone because I thought my ex-husband wouldn't want me anymore. There are a lot of cultural concepts that make women feel unworthy unless they are totally healthy and doing everything they are expected to do. May you be safe and protected today. Check-in after the October 17th tests. All three of us, John, Helen and I will be here for you.

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Thank you so much, Chris! I am truly moved by your response. I think your suggestion to take him with me is a good one. I will definitely suggest that. My husband is a wonderful man and he chooses to remain optimistic, which is normally my approach as well. I’m struggling this time, but I will take your advice and take a more mindful approach. I may even reach out to a therapist to help me with this. Thanks again for your kind words and for your support.

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@klro0001

My wife goes to almost every medical appointment, so that between the two of us we remember what doctors said. We always go together for any procedure – it's good to have the mutual support. In sickness and in health…

We spend almost all of our time together, whether it's church or shopping or doctor appointments, or just being at home. That's how we've lived for 47 years. Having a fully committed partner makes life so much better.

Jim

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@jimhd

@klro0001

My wife goes to almost every medical appointment, so that between the two of us we remember what doctors said. We always go together for any procedure – it's good to have the mutual support. In sickness and in health…

We spend almost all of our time together, whether it's church or shopping or doctor appointments, or just being at home. That's how we've lived for 47 years. Having a fully committed partner makes life so much better.

Jim

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Thank you so much.

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@kiro0001, Good morning. Did you have tests scheduled for October 17? I am just wondering if you are willing to share the results with me. If you are still waiting, then I can only guess at the anxiety of not knowing. I have been there and know how our minds can play with uncertainty. Thinking of you and wishing for you a day of peace and ease. Chris

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@artscaping

@kiro0001, Good morning. Did you have tests scheduled for October 17? I am just wondering if you are willing to share the results with me. If you are still waiting, then I can only guess at the anxiety of not knowing. I have been there and know how our minds can play with uncertainty. Thinking of you and wishing for you a day of peace and ease. Chris

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Hi, Chris. Thanks so much for following up with me. I did have my tests. The EMG was normal but the NCS showed sensory damage in left leg. However, I’ve experienced new symptoms (muscle twitching, water dripping sensations, sporadic shooting pain) in my other leg. When I explained this to the neurologist, he all but shrugged and gave me a follow up appointment for bloodwork that is scheduled for January. My husband and I were not impressed with this neurologist at all. Also, anxiety and depression has set in and I was not getting any sleep, which was making me even more anxious at work and at home. I reached out on this forum and took someone’s suggestion to discuss my psychological issues with my PCP. She prescribed Amitriptyline 25mg at night to help with sleep and depression. She also referred me to a different neurologist that I am scheduled to see December 4th. So the waiting game continues. At this point, I’m not experiencing consistent pain and I’m getting restful sleep so there’s my silver lining for now. Also, I’m in the process of finding a therapist and I’m attempting (and failing) meditation. I may try group meditation until I get the hang of it. Thanks again for reaching out and any advice is appreciated.

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I was a vegan before my symptoms worsened. Now I'm a vegan again….worth a try & here's why….

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=what+in+the+health+documentary&view=detail&mid=78262E9F3B8F32A42EBC78262E9F3B8F32A42EBC&FORM=VIRE

Liked by klro0001

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@klro0001

Hi, Chris. Thanks so much for following up with me. I did have my tests. The EMG was normal but the NCS showed sensory damage in left leg. However, I’ve experienced new symptoms (muscle twitching, water dripping sensations, sporadic shooting pain) in my other leg. When I explained this to the neurologist, he all but shrugged and gave me a follow up appointment for bloodwork that is scheduled for January. My husband and I were not impressed with this neurologist at all. Also, anxiety and depression has set in and I was not getting any sleep, which was making me even more anxious at work and at home. I reached out on this forum and took someone’s suggestion to discuss my psychological issues with my PCP. She prescribed Amitriptyline 25mg at night to help with sleep and depression. She also referred me to a different neurologist that I am scheduled to see December 4th. So the waiting game continues. At this point, I’m not experiencing consistent pain and I’m getting restful sleep so there’s my silver lining for now. Also, I’m in the process of finding a therapist and I’m attempting (and failing) meditation. I may try group meditation until I get the hang of it. Thanks again for reaching out and any advice is appreciated.

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@klro0001

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@klro0001

Hi, Chris. Thanks so much for following up with me. I did have my tests. The EMG was normal but the NCS showed sensory damage in left leg. However, I’ve experienced new symptoms (muscle twitching, water dripping sensations, sporadic shooting pain) in my other leg. When I explained this to the neurologist, he all but shrugged and gave me a follow up appointment for bloodwork that is scheduled for January. My husband and I were not impressed with this neurologist at all. Also, anxiety and depression has set in and I was not getting any sleep, which was making me even more anxious at work and at home. I reached out on this forum and took someone’s suggestion to discuss my psychological issues with my PCP. She prescribed Amitriptyline 25mg at night to help with sleep and depression. She also referred me to a different neurologist that I am scheduled to see December 4th. So the waiting game continues. At this point, I’m not experiencing consistent pain and I’m getting restful sleep so there’s my silver lining for now. Also, I’m in the process of finding a therapist and I’m attempting (and failing) meditation. I may try group meditation until I get the hang of it. Thanks again for reaching out and any advice is appreciated.

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@klro0001

That weeks and months of waiting for an appointment with a doctor is frustrating and irritating, at least it is for me. I hope you get a better neurologist. Do you live within driving range of a university hospital? They often have more resources than locals.

Chronic pain definitely has an impact on our mental health. I'm going on 15 years of that combination. The neuropathy pain began after I'd been seeing a therapist and psychiatrist, and the pain really slowed down the process of achieving any progress in my mental state. I think that it's likely that I'll need to take antidepressants for the rest of my life.

There are multiple ways to meditate. After I told my doctor about my suicide attempts, he could have put me in the hospital, but he let me go home to have two days to delegate my jobs, then I admitted myself to a small, brand new facility for people like me. I tell you that to tell you how they taught meditation.

The process of their meditation involved mindfulness and emptying one's mind. I couldn't do that because I believe that it's dangerous to empty my mind.

I meditate by emptying out the negative, harmful junk from my mind and focus on healthy things. For example, I will sometimes focus on a verse or a phrase from the Bible. Focusing on something like that tends to clear my mind, and I begin letting go of my worries and relax in the moment. It's something I do when I have a panic attack, or when I'm stressed or scared. My feeling is that keeping it simple makes meditation easier. I don't think that it matters how long I meditate, 2 minutes or 30 – whatever I have time for.

I'm seeing a neurologist now whom I didn't like a few years ago. He's shy and very soft spoken, and I didn't think he was doing anything to help me. After seeing two other neurologists, I gave him a second try and I like him. I initiate discussions and ask questions, and it draws him out. I think, too, that he's developed his communication skills over the years when I didn't see him.

I'm not going to any therapy now. I had a really good therapist but he had to quit and move for family problem. I went to the woman who took his place, but I don't click with her, so I stopped therapy a couple of months ago. It's hard to find a therapist who takes Medicare. The only ones who do accept it work for the hospital. There's no counselor or therapist within 120 miles that I can see. That's one of the trade offs we make to live where we do.

Enjoy your rest.

Jim

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@jimhd

@klro0001

That weeks and months of waiting for an appointment with a doctor is frustrating and irritating, at least it is for me. I hope you get a better neurologist. Do you live within driving range of a university hospital? They often have more resources than locals.

Chronic pain definitely has an impact on our mental health. I'm going on 15 years of that combination. The neuropathy pain began after I'd been seeing a therapist and psychiatrist, and the pain really slowed down the process of achieving any progress in my mental state. I think that it's likely that I'll need to take antidepressants for the rest of my life.

There are multiple ways to meditate. After I told my doctor about my suicide attempts, he could have put me in the hospital, but he let me go home to have two days to delegate my jobs, then I admitted myself to a small, brand new facility for people like me. I tell you that to tell you how they taught meditation.

The process of their meditation involved mindfulness and emptying one's mind. I couldn't do that because I believe that it's dangerous to empty my mind.

I meditate by emptying out the negative, harmful junk from my mind and focus on healthy things. For example, I will sometimes focus on a verse or a phrase from the Bible. Focusing on something like that tends to clear my mind, and I begin letting go of my worries and relax in the moment. It's something I do when I have a panic attack, or when I'm stressed or scared. My feeling is that keeping it simple makes meditation easier. I don't think that it matters how long I meditate, 2 minutes or 30 – whatever I have time for.

I'm seeing a neurologist now whom I didn't like a few years ago. He's shy and very soft spoken, and I didn't think he was doing anything to help me. After seeing two other neurologists, I gave him a second try and I like him. I initiate discussions and ask questions, and it draws him out. I think, too, that he's developed his communication skills over the years when I didn't see him.

I'm not going to any therapy now. I had a really good therapist but he had to quit and move for family problem. I went to the woman who took his place, but I don't click with her, so I stopped therapy a couple of months ago. It's hard to find a therapist who takes Medicare. The only ones who do accept it work for the hospital. There's no counselor or therapist within 120 miles that I can see. That's one of the trade offs we make to live where we do.

Enjoy your rest.

Jim

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Jim,

I’m a city girl so I live within driving distance of most things. This new neurologist has great reviews online so I’m hoping that I’ll have the same good experience as his other patients. If not, I’ll look into finding one at the university hospital.

Thanks for the meditation advice. Interestingly, my pastor mentioned a similar technique at church this morning (though he didn’t call it meditation). I like the suggestion to focus on a Bible verse. I have a couple in mind that have always seemed to comfort me during stressful, sad, or scary times.

Thank you again for taking time to reply and for providing helpful advice. It means more to me than I can express with words.

Kia

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@klro0001

Jim,

I’m a city girl so I live within driving distance of most things. This new neurologist has great reviews online so I’m hoping that I’ll have the same good experience as his other patients. If not, I’ll look into finding one at the university hospital.

Thanks for the meditation advice. Interestingly, my pastor mentioned a similar technique at church this morning (though he didn’t call it meditation). I like the suggestion to focus on a Bible verse. I have a couple in mind that have always seemed to comfort me during stressful, sad, or scary times.

Thank you again for taking time to reply and for providing helpful advice. It means more to me than I can express with words.

Kia

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@klro0001

I'm glad that you found it helpful. You know the story of the casting out of demons, and the failure to fill his mind with the spirit of God. That's why I don't go along with the first step of meditation, the emptying of the mind.

One morning during my stay at the safe house, I woke up with the word "abandoned", and I spent some time that day thinking about those who have abandoned me during my 55 years. One of the first conclusions was that God had never abandoned me. I know that that was, and still is, a key part of my recovery. One of my favorite hymns is "Great Is Thy Faithfulness".

He'll be faithful to you during this time in your life.

Jim

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