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jshah
@jshah

Posts: 13
Joined: Nov 13, 2017

Afib and HCM

Posted by @jshah, Tue, Jan 16 5:17pm

Hi,

Does any one have afib and HCM????

REPLY

@jshah Hi. I have afib, but what is HCM? High Class Mustache? Sorry. Couldn’t pass that up.

Ha ha. HCM is a heart disease called Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Basically the heart wall is thick and causes breathing problems. My husband has both HCM and Afib. He is getting his surgery done for HCM where they make that heart wall thin so blood can flow easily. It is a open heart surgery. We recently found out about the maze procedure that can be done while they open his heart for HCM. Maze procedure will help him with the Afib. I am not sure about that and did not get clear answer on it.

@jshah

Ha ha. HCM is a heart disease called Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Basically the heart wall is thick and causes breathing problems. My husband has both HCM and Afib. He is getting his surgery done for HCM where they make that heart wall thin so blood can flow easily. It is a open heart surgery. We recently found out about the maze procedure that can be done while they open his heart for HCM. Maze procedure will help him with the Afib. I am not sure about that and did not get clear answer on it.

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@jshah Well, Now I know I have it. My AFib and HCM is from my Amyloidosis. The best dX comes from the 12-lead ECG, measuring the strength of the QRS signal, and judging whether the tracing shows a deep vibration from the leatherized ventricular and atrial walls, pumping and relaxing. Yes, it is almost the same, except for the pump and relax signal strength. The signal strength is reduced because the protein fibrils get into the sensori-motor nerves and interrupt or dampen the signals. Eventually they will stop the flow of signals altogether.

Hi Jinal @jshah,

I’m tagging @lottyfeeble21 who has talked about coping with afib and HCM in this discussion:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/what-is-the-recovery-like-following-septal-myectomy/

I wasn’t quite sure if you’ve read the information from Mayo Clinic about the surgical maze procedure, https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/maze-procedure/gnc-20303046, and I’ve copied some relevant details for your convenience below:
“Surgical maze procedures have a high success rate, with from 70 to 95 percent of people being free of atrial fibrillation long term after the procedure. Up to 35 percent may still need medications to help control their irregular heart rhythm. If your atrial fibrillation recurs, you may need another catheter ablation or other treatment.”
@cynaburst, do you have some more insight for @jshah?

Here’s another great source of information (and reassurance, perhaps):
The Mayo Clinic Experience and Patient Stories: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy/care-at-mayo-clinic/mac-20350208

Jinal, I can imagine you have a plethora of concerns and questions about your husband’s surgery; what is worrying you the most? Remember that you are not alone – the Connect community is listening.

Afib and HCM are not uncommon. The MAZE procedure can be successful at treating it. I have some summaries of recent studies done on Afib and HCM on my blog http://www.HCMBeat.com. If you look in the tag cloud or search for atrial fibrillation you should get them to come up. I think that the most recent have found that as long as the patient is appropriately anti coagulated and rate is controlled, a patient can live in Afib without bad consequences. Of course, some people feel symptomatic in afib so it is probably best to stop it if possible.

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