Stage 3 Kidney Disease and Diet: What can I eat?

Posted by carnes @carnes, Jun 11, 2018

It seems there is very little you can eat that is healthy for the Kidneys. The web site Davida has plenty of food on it but contradicts what other sources say. Anyone know anything for breakfast, lunch and dinner that does not have any sugar or flour bodies the obvious boring or bland foods good for Kidneys and I’m allergic to sugar of any kind of sweetener and flour. Thank you.

@kamama94

@czsalt64 The 3000 mg sodium limit is the old (2018) recommendation for Stage Three CKD. The latest I have heard (as of August 2021) is 1500 mg or less for Stage Four CKD patients. Some kidney websites quote different amounts but what works for me personally is between 1500 and 2000 mg Na daily (including what occurs naturally in whole foods as well as – carefully used – processed foods.) If I am especially active and weather is hot, causing increased sodium loss through perspiration, I can tolerate the higher value. In such a case of perspiration loss of Na, the kidney is not called upon to excrete that which is lost through perspiration, therefore I am comfortable with a slight increase. However, I do not personally recommend ANY values, I merely share what my research shows the experts are saying and I share my own personal experience. Oh, please forgive me for a terrible pun, LOL, but we should take everything with a grain of salt. (Sorry, couldn't help myself.)

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NOt a doc either haha, but we all know ourselves the best.

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@kamama94 posted this comment in another thread within this group, and it fits in with our talking here.

"@gingerw, not sure where to post this info I found this AM and not positive it was DaVita but here goes: Most kidney diets start with a goal of 1,500 to 2,000 mg per day or the amount recommended by your doctor or dietitian. The sodium recommendation for stage 4 CKD is 1,000-4,000 mg/day based on fluid balance, blood pressure and other diseases that may affect sodium requirements.(DaVita?)"

What are your thoughts? How closely do you watch your daily sodium intake? While I admit to an occasional binge on tortilla chips [with red pepper hummus!], I do not watch too many labels on food, since we eat few packaged foods. For me, even low-fat cottage cheese tastes salty, as does celery! My last lab result for sodium had me within normal range, for me.
Ginger

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@gingerw

@kamama94 posted this comment in another thread within this group, and it fits in with our talking here.

"@gingerw, not sure where to post this info I found this AM and not positive it was DaVita but here goes: Most kidney diets start with a goal of 1,500 to 2,000 mg per day or the amount recommended by your doctor or dietitian. The sodium recommendation for stage 4 CKD is 1,000-4,000 mg/day based on fluid balance, blood pressure and other diseases that may affect sodium requirements.(DaVita?)"

What are your thoughts? How closely do you watch your daily sodium intake? While I admit to an occasional binge on tortilla chips [with red pepper hummus!], I do not watch too many labels on food, since we eat few packaged foods. For me, even low-fat cottage cheese tastes salty, as does celery! My last lab result for sodium had me within normal range, for me.
Ginger

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@gingerw, your comment about celery mirrors my own experience. The less salt I use the more I notice the natural saltiness of foods, especially celery. Am in the process of re-checking recommended amts of various minerals for stage 4 CKD and will send you what I find out.

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From DaVita for Stage 3:
1. Count your calories.

Adequate calories can either prevent weight loss if you’re at a desirable weight or provide extra calories if you are underweight. Weigh yourself often and keep track to see if you need additional or fewer calories. Your dietitian will determine a desirable weight and monitor your progress.

2. Eat the right kinds of fats.

If you have cardiovascular disease or your blood cholesterol is high, unhealthy fats—such as saturated fats and trans-fats—should be replaced by poly- and monounsaturated fats from vegetable oil, canola oil and olive oil. A limit on high cholesterol foods is recommended.

3. Watch for symptoms of fluid retention.

Fluid is not restricted in stage 3 CKD unless you experience fluid retention. Sudden weight gain, shortness of breath, swelling in the feet, hands and face and high blood pressure are signs of fluid retention. These symptoms may indicate a decline in kidney function and decreased urine output.

4. Reduce your phosphorus intake.

A diet with no more than 800 mg of phosphorus can help reduce the risk of too much phosphorus building up in your blood. Limit intake of foods with high levels of phosphate or phosphate additives such as organ meats, whole grain breads, processed foods, cola beverages, cheese, dried beans, liver, peanut butter, dairy products and chocolate.

5. Monitor your potassium levels.

Usually, potassium is not restricted in stage 3 CKD unless lab tests show potassium is too high. Your doctor may make medication changes or prescribe a low-potassium diet. Reduce an elevated potassium level by limiting some high-potassium foods and potassium chloride (found in salt substitute and many low-sodium processed foods), such as avocado, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew, legumes, milk, nuts, potatoes, seeds, tomato products and yogurt.

6. Know your recommended daily intake of protein.

The recommendation for protein intake in stage 3 is 0.8 g/kg body weight, the same recommendation for a healthy 150-pound adult. Whether your doctor recommends a high- or low- protein diet, it’s important to make sure your protein intake comes from high-quality sources such as egg whites, fish, poultry, meat, soy and small of amounts of dairy.

People on vegetarian and vegan diets may find it easier than meat eaters to limit protein in their diet, but will need to monitor their phosphorus and potassium intakes more closely.

7. Decrease your sodium intake.

Limiting salt and high-sodium foods reduces hypertension, assists blood pressure medications to work more effectively and treats fluid retention. The sodium recommendation for stage 3 CKD is 1,000 to 4,000 mg/day. Speak with your doctor or dietitian to determine your recommended daily amount.

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@2011panc

@carnes I also am borderline Stage 3/4 Kidney Disease. Currently I follow five limiting diets: low fiber, low carbohydrates, low fat, low dairy and low oxilate. I eat popcorn, rice cakes, rice, Grape Nuts, Shredded Wheat, bananas, strawberries, peaches, nectarines, pears (few), cantaloupe, watermelon, honeydew, oranges (few), green beans, peas, corn, cabbage, cucumbers (raw), onions, tomatoes, avocadoes, summer squash, carrots (few and most often cooked), asparagus, chicken, lean beef, tuna, fresh/frozen fish, a little pork, and a small amount of dairy from cheese, yogurt, ice cream and milk. The way to enjoy the foods you can eat is with your seasoning. I had very little available to me during a long hospital stay and watched cooking shows. Now I often check recipe sites for ideas: FoodNetwork, Cooking.com, Allrecipies.com, to name a few. I do put canned dry beans in my chili, but we only eat that a few times a month. I encourage you to check some things out and would love to hear how you are doing. Good luck.

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I also don't know what I can eat, so reading yours does help.I was about to cry, but I need to investigate this diagnosis more. Thanks for helping me realize there are foods that are acceptable.

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@kamama94

From DaVita for Stage 3:
1. Count your calories.

Adequate calories can either prevent weight loss if you’re at a desirable weight or provide extra calories if you are underweight. Weigh yourself often and keep track to see if you need additional or fewer calories. Your dietitian will determine a desirable weight and monitor your progress.

2. Eat the right kinds of fats.

If you have cardiovascular disease or your blood cholesterol is high, unhealthy fats—such as saturated fats and trans-fats—should be replaced by poly- and monounsaturated fats from vegetable oil, canola oil and olive oil. A limit on high cholesterol foods is recommended.

3. Watch for symptoms of fluid retention.

Fluid is not restricted in stage 3 CKD unless you experience fluid retention. Sudden weight gain, shortness of breath, swelling in the feet, hands and face and high blood pressure are signs of fluid retention. These symptoms may indicate a decline in kidney function and decreased urine output.

4. Reduce your phosphorus intake.

A diet with no more than 800 mg of phosphorus can help reduce the risk of too much phosphorus building up in your blood. Limit intake of foods with high levels of phosphate or phosphate additives such as organ meats, whole grain breads, processed foods, cola beverages, cheese, dried beans, liver, peanut butter, dairy products and chocolate.

5. Monitor your potassium levels.

Usually, potassium is not restricted in stage 3 CKD unless lab tests show potassium is too high. Your doctor may make medication changes or prescribe a low-potassium diet. Reduce an elevated potassium level by limiting some high-potassium foods and potassium chloride (found in salt substitute and many low-sodium processed foods), such as avocado, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew, legumes, milk, nuts, potatoes, seeds, tomato products and yogurt.

6. Know your recommended daily intake of protein.

The recommendation for protein intake in stage 3 is 0.8 g/kg body weight, the same recommendation for a healthy 150-pound adult. Whether your doctor recommends a high- or low- protein diet, it’s important to make sure your protein intake comes from high-quality sources such as egg whites, fish, poultry, meat, soy and small of amounts of dairy.

People on vegetarian and vegan diets may find it easier than meat eaters to limit protein in their diet, but will need to monitor their phosphorus and potassium intakes more closely.

7. Decrease your sodium intake.

Limiting salt and high-sodium foods reduces hypertension, assists blood pressure medications to work more effectively and treats fluid retention. The sodium recommendation for stage 3 CKD is 1,000 to 4,000 mg/day. Speak with your doctor or dietitian to determine your recommended daily amount.

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I would like to add that portion control is critical. An inexpensive digital scale works wonders. Also, many carbonated beverages have high amounts of phosphates and should be avoided or greatly reduced.

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@miker8888

I would like to add that portion control is critical. An inexpensive digital scale works wonders. Also, many carbonated beverages have high amounts of phosphates and should be avoided or greatly reduced.

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@miker8888, carbonic acid ( carbonated beverages) isn't great for teeth, either. And your scale suggestion also is a good one. I measure foods in grams rather than cups or tablespoons. Most food labels include gram serving sizes. Because a frozen food nutrition label usually refers to the item in its frozen, uncooked state, I weigh those things while still frozen before preparing. Some items (spices and seasonings come to mind) can be measured in spoons or cups or fractions thereof but whenever possible measuring gram weight of, say, green beans or lettuce is more accurate than measuring by cup or spoon. Food scales come in various shapes and sizes – mine is an inexpensive small one with no batteries or digital readouts, just a place to position the food item and needle in a circle marking ounces and grams – easy to use.

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@miker8888

I would like to add that portion control is critical. An inexpensive digital scale works wonders. Also, many carbonated beverages have high amounts of phosphates and should be avoided or greatly reduced.

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@miker8888 Your comment brought to mind something my husband has said often. He is a kidney transplant recipient, who now eats what he wants to. i keep a pretty strict renal diet, myself, so many times we are fixing two different looking/tasting meals. When he says, "well, you can have some of [fill in the blank] because your phosphorous/calcium/potassium levels have been really good!", my response is, "they're good because I am watching what I eat!"
Ginger

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Those are decisions I make every day. It does take discipline. I strictly watch my portions on higher K vegetables and fruits. I commend you for that.

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