First steps for coping with mild cognitive impairment

Mar 21, 2023 | Dr. Anne Shandera-Ochsner, HABIT Midwest Director | @dranneshanderaochsner | Comments (4)

 

We invite you to take a moment to check out this great synopsis of some initial steps folks can take after receiving a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment. That can be a time where it's common to feel overwhelmed and unsure what to do next. Unlike conditions with clear-cut medical treatments, many people feel adrift after the flurry of appointments has died down and a diagnosis is confirmed. We think the staff who created the article below did a great job of highlighting the key "action items" to be aware of.

First steps when you have mild cognitive impairment - Mayo Clinic

Interested in more newsfeed posts like this? Go to the Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) blog.

I have recently been diagnosed with MCI. All relevant information will be most helpful.

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@jules2

I have recently been diagnosed with MCI. All relevant information will be most helpful.

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@jules2 Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect! Glad you found us. There are many discussions about MCI, if you just wander through some of the main groups.
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/new-to-mci/
Here is one. There is another when you click on the “first steps when you have….” In the article above. And I know that a new discussion was recently started for and about those with MCI..
What is your main challenge right now?

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@jules2

I have recently been diagnosed with MCI. All relevant information will be most helpful.

Jump to this post

Good evening @jules2. I am happy to meet you, especially because I was diagnosed with MCI last year.

Here are a couple of items and issues that I have experienced. Some versions of them might be helpful for you.

The test results. I had six hours of testing to verify the point at which I struggle with memory. My psychiatric therapist presented the summation to my daughter and my life partner. They were both overwhelmed with the amount of helpful information that was presented and discussed. Executive functioning is my biggest challenge. That includes planning how I am going to spend the day by using helpful lists and including desired outcomes. This is my most difficult challenge. I am sure not happy when I begin to get ready for bed and realize I missed an appointment and didn't take the laundry out of the dryer.

Second on my "don't forget" list are my stability exercises and yoga stretches. They really help me move more efficiently and with less neuropathic pain.

Third on my must-remember list is my data storage, manipulation, and safekeeping. Computers are always more complicated with every new download. My 6-year-old grandson knows more about how to use my computer than I do. I can't believe I was an IT Director for a company in the early technology era.

Last but not least is successfully practicing "letting go". It is just a bit of o.k. to forget the street names where I used to live. Or....I find out I cannot put a name to the faces that appear and reappear on Facebook. I want to help with the gardening but am afraid of falling as well as forgetting what is a weed and what is a new plant.

And finally, the most challenging item is to manage my medication purposefully and correctly. Even those daily pill boxes seem to have confusing elements. And I put the bi-weekly self-injection dates on my calendar at the beginning of every month.

I am sure there are more......".life goes on" items that it would be nice to remember.
How are you doing at this point? Have I forgotten something important?

May you be safe, protected and free of inner and outer harm.
Chris

REPLY
@artscaping

Good evening @jules2. I am happy to meet you, especially because I was diagnosed with MCI last year.

Here are a couple of items and issues that I have experienced. Some versions of them might be helpful for you.

The test results. I had six hours of testing to verify the point at which I struggle with memory. My psychiatric therapist presented the summation to my daughter and my life partner. They were both overwhelmed with the amount of helpful information that was presented and discussed. Executive functioning is my biggest challenge. That includes planning how I am going to spend the day by using helpful lists and including desired outcomes. This is my most difficult challenge. I am sure not happy when I begin to get ready for bed and realize I missed an appointment and didn't take the laundry out of the dryer.

Second on my "don't forget" list are my stability exercises and yoga stretches. They really help me move more efficiently and with less neuropathic pain.

Third on my must-remember list is my data storage, manipulation, and safekeeping. Computers are always more complicated with every new download. My 6-year-old grandson knows more about how to use my computer than I do. I can't believe I was an IT Director for a company in the early technology era.

Last but not least is successfully practicing "letting go". It is just a bit of o.k. to forget the street names where I used to live. Or....I find out I cannot put a name to the faces that appear and reappear on Facebook. I want to help with the gardening but am afraid of falling as well as forgetting what is a weed and what is a new plant.

And finally, the most challenging item is to manage my medication purposefully and correctly. Even those daily pill boxes seem to have confusing elements. And I put the bi-weekly self-injection dates on my calendar at the beginning of every month.

I am sure there are more......".life goes on" items that it would be nice to remember.
How are you doing at this point? Have I forgotten something important?

May you be safe, protected and free of inner and outer harm.
Chris

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Why six hours of testing?

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