"Let Your Breath Find You": Meet @tsc

Jan 7 9:06am | John, Volunteer Mentor | @johnbishop | Comments (24)

Member Spotlights feature interviews with fellow Connect members. Learn more about members you’ve connected with and some you haven’t met yet. Nominate a member you think should share the spotlight.

Teri, a member on Mayo Clinic Connect
Teri with the vintage Hawaiian quilt she helped restore.

 

JOHN: How did you find Mayo Clinic Connect? What motivates you to take part in the community?

@tsc: After I was diagnosed with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA), I searched for information about the diseases on the internet. I found a discussion from Mayo Clinic Connect, took a deeper look, and decided to join. It was fitting because Dr. Horton of the Mayo Clinic did groundbreaking work on Giant Cell Arteritis in the 1930s.

JOHN: What about Mayo Clinic Connect makes you feel comfortable to share and to be open with the community?

@tsc: We, the members, share similar diseases, symptoms and circumstances that are often new to us and that we struggle through. At times, it can be overwhelming. Talking to friends is an option, but there's a limit to how much we can share with those in dissimilar circumstances. Members with experience offer a diverse range of insights, share their stories, and make suggestions. As a rule, they are respectful and helpful.

JOHN: What groups do you participate in?

@tsc: I mostly take part in Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR), Bones, Joints & Muscles, and Caregivers: Dementia groups.

JOHN: Tell us about a meaningful moment on Mayo Clinic Connect.

@tsc: I enjoy hearing the perspective of @larryh123 in the Caregivers: Dementia group. He lives with Lewy body dementia and explains what he experiences so well. He gives me the opportunity to understand things from his perspective. 

I am struck by the strength of so many members who persevere, seek answers and wellness in the face of so much adversity.

JOHN: What surprised you the most about Mayo Clinic Connect?

@tsc: Members care and stay civil. The volunteer mentors are a welcome presence, always there to help.

JOHN: What energizes you? How do you find balance in your life?

@tsc: I recently felt great when I was able to clean the house and have a guest over for dinner. For balance, I do Sara Meeks' spinal decompression exercise every night. She is a physical therapist who specializes in osteoporosis. It consists of lying on a flat surface, knees bent, palms up and arms at a 45 degree angle. "Let your breath find you," no distractions. The recommended time is 5 to 15 minutes.

JOHN: Tell us about your favorite pastime or activity.

@tsc: I enjoy preserving historical records. I volunteer in the archives of a local museum that tells the story of our island. The work of describing photos in a database is interesting because I get to step back in time and see what was going on here in the 1960s. I also did some textile restoration on a vintage Hawaiian quilt for a new permanent exhibit. The people who work at the museum are super. 

JOHN: Do you have a favorite quote, life motto or personal mantra?

@tsc: After my husband and I were married, my father said, "Be kind to each other." Think of the impact on society if more of us practiced kindness in everything from our day-to-day interactions with others to our activities and decisions on a larger scale.

JOHN: What do you appreciate the most in your friends?

@tsc: Some good friends have always been there for me. A couple of years before PMR and GCA, I had open heart surgery. Friends drove me to and from the airport, shopped or took me shopping, and checked in regularly. In May, one of those same friends accompanied me on a flight to another island for my temporal artery biopsy, with less than one day's notice! 

JOHN: Puppies or Kittens?

@tsc: I don't have a pet, but there is a neighborhood dog, Lucy, who lives under a house. The occupants take no responsibility for her and she depends upon the kindness of strangers for food. She is extremely wary. I've been feeding her on and off for a couple of years, depending upon her willingness to interact with me. The rescue organizations have tried to catch her many times, but she's just too fast.

See more Member Spotlights.

Interested in more newsfeed posts like this? Go to the About Connect: Who, What & Why blog.

@rosemarya

@tsc, I agree with what you said about the strength of so many members who persevere, seek answers and wellness in the face of so much adversity. I also find Connect to be a place of hope and inspiration during times of trouble. I am happy to meet you here as I mostly participate in the Transplant Group after discovering Mayo Clinic Connect after my organ transplant.
Last evening as I read your interview, I felt a genuine sense of comfort and calmness. Thank you for this interview.
How does one become a textile restorer? Are you a quilter yourself?

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Hi @rosemarya I just finished typing a reply to you, then somehow lost it. Frustrating! I cannot imagine what you have endured in receiving an organ transplant. When I start thinking what I have been through is extraordinary I meet others through Connect and my experiences pale in comparison.
To answer your question about textile restoration, in preparation for a new permanent exhibit, the museum brought in a consultant to train staff and volunteers. I had some background in sewing so opted to work on textiles. We learned invisible mending techniques and also some aspects of display. The vintage Hawaiian quilt needed first to be mended and then a backing to hold magnets had to be sewn to the back. The quilt is displayed by magnets. They are so powerful that someone with a pacemaker has to stand a certain number of feet away from them. Two other volunteers also started working on the quilt once they finished their projects. I am grateful for the opportunity given me to do that work.
Your comments were so thoughtful. Thank you, and best wishes for a healthy year.

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Hi @rosemarya I posted a reply to your comment yesterday, but I don't see it here. Did you get a notification? If not, I'll repost…Teri

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@tsc

Hi @rosemarya I posted a reply to your comment yesterday, but I don't see it here. Did you get a notification? If not, I'll repost…Teri

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Your reply to Rosemary is visible. I think you just need to click View More below Rosemary’s post. Here’s your post from yesterday https://connect.mayoclinic.org/comment/671691/

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@colleenyoung

Your reply to Rosemary is visible. I think you just need to click View More below Rosemary’s post. Here’s your post from yesterday https://connect.mayoclinic.org/comment/671691/

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Thank you, Colleen.

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I have a question but I don’t see a category to request an answer.
My question: Is it true that using iodized salt actually depletes the body of iodine. This makes absolutely no sense to me!

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@joycebcoiner

I have a question but I don’t see a category to request an answer.
My question: Is it true that using iodized salt actually depletes the body of iodine. This makes absolutely no sense to me!

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Joyce, you may wish to ask your question here in the Just Want To Talk group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/other/

Click the link and then click “Start a Discussion”

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@tsc

Hi Chris, @johnbishop also shared a story about rounding up some wildish kittens for adoption. Lucy is a damaged dog who indeed lives on her own terms. She is fearful, but free to come and go as she pleases. A "pet" dog lives at the house Lucy lives under. He is chained, has a small house to go into and no attention is paid to him whatsoever. What dog is better off, the neglected dog with a home or the stray who manages to survive by her wits? Lucy looks healthy. I worry she has heart worm, but also realize there's a limit to what I can do for her. There would be less abused and neglected animals if more people were kind. All the best, Teri

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Have you tried a rescue group for the chained dog? Most states have them. They will try to get the owners to relinquish the chained dog and then work to find it a loving home.

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Hi, @psb610, frankly I didn't think of that, maybe because I've been preoccupied with Lucy. Tthey're not the nicest people, but it is worth a try. Thank you for the suggestion. I will follow up.

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@tsc

Hi, @psb610, frankly I didn't think of that, maybe because I've been preoccupied with Lucy. Tthey're not the nicest people, but it is worth a try. Thank you for the suggestion. I will follow up.

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Thank you! I hate to see a dog living its life on a chain. That was my first post on here. I had read the feature about you and then saw your posts about the dogs.

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Hello @tsc,

It is such a pleasure to get to know you better. Our paths on Connect have not crossed as I tend to stay in the cancer groups (in particular NETs) and the Parkinson's group. I did, however, relate to your narrative about Connect. I also find a great deal of strength in the members who post. As you said, my health issues seem to pale in comparison to others and I so admire their courage when faced with difficult health issues. I believe that the courage I read about has a way of strengthening me as well.

I also appreciate the encouragement that is offered on Connect. Many members join Connect feeling very weak and insecure, especially if they have just been diagnosed with a new health issue. As I watch the strength they garner from reading other members' posts I realize that encouragement is important and that is what we can all give to each other on Connect.

I also found your reference to Sara Meeks interesting as I have osteopenia and had not heard of her spinal decompression exercises. I will look for it.

Thank you for your participation here on Connect. You help make this online community a safe and helpful place for others!

A special thanks to John, @johnbishop, for reaching out and providing this great Spotlight!

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@hopeful33250

Hello @tsc,

It is such a pleasure to get to know you better. Our paths on Connect have not crossed as I tend to stay in the cancer groups (in particular NETs) and the Parkinson's group. I did, however, relate to your narrative about Connect. I also find a great deal of strength in the members who post. As you said, my health issues seem to pale in comparison to others and I so admire their courage when faced with difficult health issues. I believe that the courage I read about has a way of strengthening me as well.

I also appreciate the encouragement that is offered on Connect. Many members join Connect feeling very weak and insecure, especially if they have just been diagnosed with a new health issue. As I watch the strength they garner from reading other members' posts I realize that encouragement is important and that is what we can all give to each other on Connect.

I also found your reference to Sara Meeks interesting as I have osteopenia and had not heard of her spinal decompression exercises. I will look for it.

Thank you for your participation here on Connect. You help make this online community a safe and helpful place for others!

A special thanks to John, @johnbishop, for reaching out and providing this great Spotlight!

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Thank you so much for your encouragment, Teresa. We share the same name, without the "h", but I've always been Teri. It would be good to have this forum in "normal" times, but at this time, deep into the pandemic, which just keeps coming at us, this forum offers us meaningful contact with others and combats feelings of isolation, factors which contribute to health. I think Mentors are a special breed, dedicating more time and commitment to Connect. Thank you for your work, and best in health!

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@psb610

Thank you! I hate to see a dog living its life on a chain. That was my first post on here. I had read the feature about you and then saw your posts about the dogs.

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I'll let you know what happens. Thanks!

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