Transplant

Welcome to the Mayo Clinic Transplant page! Mayo Clinic is the largest integrated transplant provider in the United States, performing over 2,000 solid organ and bone marrow transplants each year at our campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

In these pages, there are materials for transplant recipients as well as living donors. No matter where you are in your transplant journey, our goal is to connect you to others and provide you with information and support.

PUBLIC PAGE
Tue, Dec 6, 2016 10:32am

The Need for Living Kidney Donors

By Mayo Clinic Transplant Staff, @mayoclinictransplantstaff

Over 3,000 new patients are added to the kidney transplant waiting list each month. With this great need for kidneys, there’s also a significant need for living kidney donors. It’s a big decision but choosing to become a living kidney donor could have a huge impact on someone’s life.

You can understand more about the donation process with our Living Donor ToolKit.

 

Did You Know?

  • To be a living kidney donor, you don’t have to be related or even know the recipient.
  • A typical hospital stay for living kidney donors is typically just 2-3 days.
  • The short and long-term survival rates for patients who had a living donor are better than those who had a deceased donor.
  • There’s no cutoff age for being a living kidney donor.
  • Living donation reduces the amount of time a person spends waiting for a deceased organ.
  • As a living donor, the recipient’s insurance typically covers all donation-related medical expenses.
  • Living kidney donation often allows a person to avoid dialysis completely if it was not already started.

 

Kati DonatedPhoto of Nancy and Kati chatting on FB Live

When Kati heard in an email that her child’s school principal needed a kidney, she didn’t hesitate to get tested. Now Kati and the recipient of her kidney, Nancy, have become close friends.

Learn more about Kati’s story and watch the Facebook Live video of her and the recipient of her liver.

 

 

Donors Needed13 people die each day waiting for a kidney transplant

Every day someone needs a kidney. Living kidney donation is a wonderful act of generosity and courage for someone in need. You can make an impact.

If you have interest in becoming a living organ donor, find out how to get started on being a candidate for donation.

 

HELPFUL LINKS

Liked by Scott, carroyo

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

@karis

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

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Hi Karis and welcome to our transplant group! Best of luck today as you undergo your tests and screenings. Living donation is an amazing act of generosity and courage – thank you for taking on this journey! Not only will you make a difference for someone waiting on the transplant list, but you will set an amazing example of selflessness and kindness. Who knows, maybe you will inspire others to consider living donation.

I’m sure you’re well-informed about the living donor process and what to expect, but take a look at our new transplant page with dedicated information for living donors:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/transplant/#/!tab=resources-35. You may find some helpful nuggets in there as your journey continues.

Are you donating to someone you know? Or are you donating anonymously?

@karis

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

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This is an anonymous donation. I have seen the need and feel that if I am accepted it will be a good thing for someone.

@karis

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

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Wow, that’s incredible Karis. Do you know if your transplant center does organ donation chains? If so you will definitely impact more than one person. If you haven’t heard of donation chains, they start when someone like you chooses to give anonymously to a compatible recipient. The chain continues with your recipient’s donor (who wasn’t a match) giving to a compatible recipient, and so on. The average donation chain at Mayo Clinic includes 6-9 transplanted kidneys. Talk about amazing! Here’s a graphic explaining the concept: http://mayohealthhighlights.startribune.com/2016/05/13/the-organ-donation-chain/.

Another resource I wanted to point you to is our transplant discussion group. It’s a welcoming online community where more than 100 transplant patients, caregivers and donors share their experiences, find support and exchange information with others. Here’s a link if you’re interested: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/transplant/. I know the group would love to hear from you!

@karis

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

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@karis Thank you, karis, for sharing this information.
Thank you for your desire to be tested as a potential living kidney donor.
Thank you for offering a sign hope to the many persons awaiting a kidney transplant.
I hope that the testing is a positive experience for you. And I hope that you will be able to fulfill your goal to be a living donor.
I am a recipient of liver and kidney donation from a deceased donor, and I want you ( and anyone reading this) to know that organ donation is the most precious gift for one person to give to another.
Rosemary

Liked by Scott

@karis

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

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Hi, @karis, I hope that you are doing well. I am visiting you from the Connect Transplant Discussion Group. And I want to invite you to have a look at a newly posted discussion about being a living kidney donor. Please know that I welcome you to join the discussion.
Rosemary
.

@karis

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

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@karis, here’s the direct link to the discussion that Rosemary refers to. Perhaps you can offer some guidance and support to Lovelly as she waits to hear if she is a match for her son.
– Kidney transplant – process for being a living donor http://mayocl.in/2kUIcrW

@karis

Today, Dec 12, I begin the process to determine if I will be an acceptable living kidney donor. With successful results this week, one less person will be on the transplant list.

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I did complete the testing to become a kidney donor and all the blood and scan tests were positive. However, when the committee that makes final approval met the decision was to not approve me. The reason given to me was that my kidney had several arteries which would make the transplant problematical for a recipient. As for the testing, I had no problems with any of them and consider that I received a complete physical examination with good results.Carroll Sharp

In a section I just read called Did You Know? it says ” there’s no cutoff age for being a living kidney donor”. I need a kidney transplant and have been evaluated & accepted for kidney transplant at Mayo in Minnesota. I’ve been trying to spread the word and Mayo Living Donation contact information to anyone who is interested. A relative of mine contacted Mayo to ask about beng tested for me and she was rejected because she was too old. She is 82 and was told the cutoff is 80.

I don’t know if requirements and procedures are the same for Rochester and Jacksonville,however, I was tested as a living kidney donor here in Jacksonville and all testing was positive with the exception that my kidney had multiple arteries which would make transplant problematic for the recipient. If this were to change, I would still be agreeable to go forward with the donation.

@cehunt57

In a section I just read called Did You Know? it says ” there’s no cutoff age for being a living kidney donor”. I need a kidney transplant and have been evaluated & accepted for kidney transplant at Mayo in Minnesota. I’ve been trying to spread the word and Mayo Living Donation contact information to anyone who is interested. A relative of mine contacted Mayo to ask about beng tested for me and she was rejected because she was too old. She is 82 and was told the cutoff is 80.

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@cehunt57 – It is my understanding that the cut off age is dependent on the transplant center. My nephrologist at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester) told me 80 would be too old because “it would not be a good transplant.” (My Mom offered to donate and she is 80). Apparently everyone loses kidney function with age so I got the impression that if you need the kidney to last many years (20 plus) then the age of the donor will impact the success and longevity of the transplant.

@cehunt57

In a section I just read called Did You Know? it says ” there’s no cutoff age for being a living kidney donor”. I need a kidney transplant and have been evaluated & accepted for kidney transplant at Mayo in Minnesota. I’ve been trying to spread the word and Mayo Living Donation contact information to anyone who is interested. A relative of mine contacted Mayo to ask about beng tested for me and she was rejected because she was too old. She is 82 and was told the cutoff is 80.

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@cehunt57, I would like to welcome you to Connect. This is an excellent question. I am happy to see that you are receiving some helpful replies from others who have experience with this.

I wish you well on your journey to transplant.
Rosemary

@cehunt57

In a section I just read called Did You Know? it says ” there’s no cutoff age for being a living kidney donor”. I need a kidney transplant and have been evaluated & accepted for kidney transplant at Mayo in Minnesota. I’ve been trying to spread the word and Mayo Living Donation contact information to anyone who is interested. A relative of mine contacted Mayo to ask about beng tested for me and she was rejected because she was too old. She is 82 and was told the cutoff is 80.

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Hi @cehunt57. Glad to hear you’re spreading the word about living donation! Be sure to check out our recipient toolkit (http://mayocl.in/2oZ9oId) and living donor toolkit (http://mayocl.in/2pGgHCF) for resources and information that may be helpful to you. Our apologies for any confusion about the cut off age for a living kidney donor. A donor’s eligibility is so hard to predict without a medical exam, which is why we say there is no hard cut off. But generally speaking, for a related living kidney donor we may consider people in their 70s, and for unrelated donors we typically consider people in their 60s as the highest age. Hope that helps and best of luck with your search!

Thanks everybody for your responses to my comments. I find it peculiar that I keep getting referred to the Living Donor Toolkit and the Recipient Toolkit information because the information in there is what prompted my comments in the first place. As a person in need of a kidney transplant I read everything I can to help my cause and pass the information on to potential donors. It is really frustrating when potential donors asking for information are told something different or contrary to other information they’ve already seen or read from the same source. It isn’t confidence inspiring for potential donors to feel like they can’t get consistent, straight answers and it is devastating for recipient candidates to see their potential donor pool shrink with each of these conflicting bits of information. Let me give an example. From the Donor Toolkit “there’s no age cutoff for living kidney donation”. My cousin was told 80. lcamino’s mother was told “80 is too old”. kquick says 70’s may be considered for related living kidney donors and 60’s for unrelated living kidney donors. I have other examples but I’m starting to get bummed out. I can only imagine how hard it is for people to consider living organ donation and reliable information is important.

@cehunt57

Thanks everybody for your responses to my comments. I find it peculiar that I keep getting referred to the Living Donor Toolkit and the Recipient Toolkit information because the information in there is what prompted my comments in the first place. As a person in need of a kidney transplant I read everything I can to help my cause and pass the information on to potential donors. It is really frustrating when potential donors asking for information are told something different or contrary to other information they’ve already seen or read from the same source. It isn’t confidence inspiring for potential donors to feel like they can’t get consistent, straight answers and it is devastating for recipient candidates to see their potential donor pool shrink with each of these conflicting bits of information. Let me give an example. From the Donor Toolkit “there’s no age cutoff for living kidney donation”. My cousin was told 80. lcamino’s mother was told “80 is too old”. kquick says 70’s may be considered for related living kidney donors and 60’s for unrelated living kidney donors. I have other examples but I’m starting to get bummed out. I can only imagine how hard it is for people to consider living organ donation and reliable information is important.

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@cehunt57, Well your story does sound very frustrating. I recommend choosing a transplant center, obtaining their information personally (in person or via phone) from the staff, and sticking with that. If you have met with a transplant team I would think they would walk you through the process. Now I’m saying that and I’m a year or two out from getting a kidney transplant so this is simply a recommendation. Best of luck, and most importantly, DON’T GIVE UP!

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