THANK YOU: A partner guide for hearing loss professionals

The Ida Institute is looking for people with hearing impairment to test a new guide that they are developing. The guide is called "Partnering for Great Hearing Care: A Guide for people with hearing loss and hearing care professionals".

The Ida Institute (https://idainstitute.com/) is an independent, non-profit organization working to build a community that embraces person-centered care. Together with clinicians, academics, and people with hearing loss around the world, we help people develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence they need to better manage hearing loss.

The purpose of the guide is to support people with hearing loss and clinicians to build a trustful partnership. It is a digital guide with practical advice on how to do this. The guide is based on four building blocks. These building blocks were identified through a thorough explorative insights process with interviews and focus groups with people with hearing loss and professionals on how to build a partnership. (Some members from Mayo Clinic Connect were involved in this.)

The guide addresses both the person with hearing loss and the hearing care professional, to make it clear that it takes two to tango, when it comes to getting most out of the partnership.

With your help, the guide can become a practical and useful a tool for people with hearing loss and professionals to get the most out of hearing care appointments and get the best possible collaboration.

Keep in mind that the guide you will review is a first prototype, so it is still a little rough around the edges. We will be doing further work to refine and finalize the guide, when we have achieved feedback on the guide.

HOW TO TAKE PART
To take part, you must be a person living with hearing loss. Use the first link to go through the guide. It takes around 25 minutes to go through the guide. After this, please use the feedback link to give your feedback.

1. Read and review the draft guide (25 minutes).
Link to the guide https://360.articulate.com/review/content/6b7b9905-7fce-4f92-aa14-b5f31618b64e/review

2. Submit your feedback (5-20 minutes).
Click this link to submit your feedback https://hearing.research.net/r/QQLR8FP

Deadline is January 23, 2022.
Thanks on behalf of the ida Institute.
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The Guide is published.
The Ida Institute (https://idainstitute.com/) would like to thank the Mayo Clinic Connect community and its members of the Hearing Loss group for your help with providing valuable feedback to the resources in the development phase.

In a global research project conducted in 2020, the Ida Institute found that people with hearing loss and professionals value partnership and human connection in hearing care consultations. This reflects a global megatrend across healthcare, but research suggests that real understanding of what it takes to build such partnerships is lacking.

Through interviews with people with hearing loss and their clinicians, the Ida Institute collected insights about successful partnerships and identified the key ingredients. The animated resource was then created and tested with extensive input from consumers and professionals, as well as patient and professional organizations around the world.

Feedback has already been positive, with the guide described by one professional as “a terrific reminder of how to create a patient-centric experience with emphasis on teamwork,” and by a consumer as “a fresh and clear look at the partnership between hearing professionals and those with hearing loss.”

The animated guide and PDF summary are available for free on the Ida Institute website: https://idainstitute.com/tools/partnering_for_great_hearing_care/

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Hearing Loss Support Group.

The deadline says 2021…is that meant to say 2022

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I think this is a wonderful way to dialogue with both parties and would be happy to participate.

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Here’s an example: I was assigned to Dr G a few weeks ago. I was told to look up the credentials on line. I always check because my insurance company always asks of course. Surprise! This person is apparently a PhD prof but not a medical doctor, but how was I to know????? And I could NOT FIND THE CREDENTIALS SO I CANCELLED. My cochlear implant would be postponed anyway. It does take years to make progress.

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@zander44

The deadline says 2021…is that meant to say 2022

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Thanks WBG. The deadline date is Jan 23, 2022. I have corrected the original message. Thank you.

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There are so many Hearing aids out there and the prices are steep.

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@coppermoon

Here’s an example: I was assigned to Dr G a few weeks ago. I was told to look up the credentials on line. I always check because my insurance company always asks of course. Surprise! This person is apparently a PhD prof but not a medical doctor, but how was I to know????? And I could NOT FIND THE CREDENTIALS SO I CANCELLED. My cochlear implant would be postponed anyway. It does take years to make progress.

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@coppermoon Curious to know what this professional's PhD was in. Some audiologists do have PhD degrees. Audiologists, even those with doctorate degrees in audiology (AuD indicates doctor of audiology), are not 'medical' doctors. Many have private practices, but some work with ENT (Ear/Nose/Throat) medical doctors.

Have you been to an ENT clinic or cochlear implant center regarding a cochlear implant? Where do you live?

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I have already been approved by a specialist ENT MD in the Phoenix area for TWO implants but Medicare only pays for one. I wanted a second opinion and was upfront about that. Now with Mayo firing 700 people over lack of COVID vacs and surgeries postponed and hospitals full, I guess I will wait some more.

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@coppermoon

I have already been approved by a specialist ENT MD in the Phoenix area for TWO implants but Medicare only pays for one. I wanted a second opinion and was upfront about that. Now with Mayo firing 700 people over lack of COVID vacs and surgeries postponed and hospitals full, I guess I will wait some more.

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But I did not exactly answer your question. Yes this person evidently has a PhD and teaches about hearing or a lack of it. But when I asked the telephone scheduler about credentials for this “ Dr” the scheduler told me the familiar “just go online about Mayo and look it up.” Well, thinking it was a medical doctor, I could not find this person and figured she must be new. I called the telephone scheduler back and she said “Oh you must have spelled the name wrong as it ends in z and not s”. So, I felt I was being shuffled off to some new person which is true, and I cancelled. Have any suggestions?

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@coppermoon

But I did not exactly answer your question. Yes this person evidently has a PhD and teaches about hearing or a lack of it. But when I asked the telephone scheduler about credentials for this “ Dr” the scheduler told me the familiar “just go online about Mayo and look it up.” Well, thinking it was a medical doctor, I could not find this person and figured she must be new. I called the telephone scheduler back and she said “Oh you must have spelled the name wrong as it ends in z and not s”. So, I felt I was being shuffled off to some new person which is true, and I cancelled. Have any suggestions?

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Coppermoon, as @julieo4 states, audiologists typically have a PhD. All new audiologists are required to have a doctor of audiology (AuD) degree. They are not required to have a medical degree (MD). Read more here about the differences between an audiologist, ENT specialists and hearing instrument specialist.
https://www.healthyhearing.com/report/51578-So-you-want-to-become-an-audiologist
Mayo Clinic hearing specialists work as a team. Audiology specialists are experienced with hearing and balance problems, from the common to the serious and complex. Audiologists partner with ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists, as well as with doctors in family medicine, preventive medicine, internal medicine, neurology, oncology, occupational medicine, pediatrics and other specialties. A surgeon who specializes in disorders of the ears, nose and throat (otolaryngologist) performs the surgery. With this team-based approach, audiologists and allied health staff trained in caring for people with hearing loss and balance problems work together to provide exactly the care needed.

Read more here:
– Audiology at Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/departments-centers/audiology/sections/overview/ovc-20429056
– Cochlear implants: Who are they for? https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cochlear-implants/expert-answers/cochlear-implants/faq-20058398

Mayo Clinic audiologists are listed in the directory. Can I help you find out their biography?

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