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What brand of turmeric is best for a diabetic?

Posted by @retiredteacher, Oct 18, 2017

I have read about turmeric and have developed arthritis in my hands and my knee joint. I have two friends who take turmeric regularly and swear by it. They are like I am—totally avoid medicines from Big Pharma if possible. They say it is a blessing. I’m not sure what way is best—pills or powder mixed with water. I read the entry of turmeric with synthroid, but what about a diabetic taking it to help with joint pain? I have taken glucosamine, and that helps a little bit, but people who take turmeric say it basically does away with the pain. I know it’s not a cure, but if it helps the pain, I would like to try it. I read where turmeric has to have pepper with it. I know there are quacks and faux products, but the good ones are natural, herbal and have been used for years for joint pain and other problems. I think natural is best. Not paying Big Pharma to hawk a medicine that costs a fortune.

Thanks for any help.

retiredteacher

REPLY

@retiredteacher In your search for evidence-based information on turmeric and its use in treating diabetes, I thought you’d appreciate this systematic review
Curcumin and Diabetes: A Systematic Review by Dong-wei Zhang et al. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3857752/
The conclusion states:
“Recent research has provided the scientific basis for “traditional” curcumin and confirmed the important role of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its associated disorders. Curcumin could favorably affect most of the leading aspects of diabetes, including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and islet apoptosis and necrosis (Figure 2). In addition, curcumin could prevent the deleterious complications of diabetes. Despite the potential tremendous benefits of this multifaceted nature product, results from clinical trials of curcumin are only available in using curcumin to treat diabetic nephropathy, microangiopathy and retinopathy so far. Studies are badly needed to be done in humans to confirm the potential of curcumin in limitation of diabetes and other associated disorders. Further, multiple approaches are also needed to overcome limited solubility and poor bioavailability of curcumin. These include synthesis of curcuminoids and development of novel formulations of curcumin, such as nanoparticles, liposomal encapsulation, emulsions, and sustained released tablets. Enhanced bioavailability and convinced clinical trial results of curcumin are likely to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of therapeutic agents for diabetes by generating a “super curcumin” in the near future.”

I found this blog about turmeric, including this article “Turmeric Dosage For Diabetes” https://www.turmericforhealth.com/turmeric-dosage/turmeric-dosage-for-diabetes. The blog also list brands, however you’ll want to do due diligence and research the validity of the claims made on the website. It is unclear who is the publisher. The article might give you a starting point to discuss with your doctor or diabetes educator.

@colleenyoung

@retiredteacher In your search for evidence-based information on turmeric and its use in treating diabetes, I thought you’d appreciate this systematic review
Curcumin and Diabetes: A Systematic Review by Dong-wei Zhang et al. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3857752/
The conclusion states:
“Recent research has provided the scientific basis for “traditional” curcumin and confirmed the important role of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its associated disorders. Curcumin could favorably affect most of the leading aspects of diabetes, including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and islet apoptosis and necrosis (Figure 2). In addition, curcumin could prevent the deleterious complications of diabetes. Despite the potential tremendous benefits of this multifaceted nature product, results from clinical trials of curcumin are only available in using curcumin to treat diabetic nephropathy, microangiopathy and retinopathy so far. Studies are badly needed to be done in humans to confirm the potential of curcumin in limitation of diabetes and other associated disorders. Further, multiple approaches are also needed to overcome limited solubility and poor bioavailability of curcumin. These include synthesis of curcuminoids and development of novel formulations of curcumin, such as nanoparticles, liposomal encapsulation, emulsions, and sustained released tablets. Enhanced bioavailability and convinced clinical trial results of curcumin are likely to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of therapeutic agents for diabetes by generating a “super curcumin” in the near future.”

I found this blog about turmeric, including this article “Turmeric Dosage For Diabetes” https://www.turmericforhealth.com/turmeric-dosage/turmeric-dosage-for-diabetes. The blog also list brands, however you’ll want to do due diligence and research the validity of the claims made on the website. It is unclear who is the publisher. The article might give you a starting point to discuss with your doctor or diabetes educator.

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Thanks, Colleen. It seems that recently, I have heard about turmeric rather frequently. The people I know are well educated and their doctors are aware that they are taking this herb. I don’t know everyone I’ve heard from, but it seems that the herb is a better choice and has none of the side effects of pharmaceutical drugs like Metformin. As you know I research almost daily, and in doing so I have discovered other herbal treatments for diabetes that real people have found lower A1c and help inflammation and boost the immune system. To date I have kept my diabetes in check and don’t have to take any medicine. I was in range at my endo appointment last week, so no changes. I don’t have another appointment for four months. He says I am a “controlled diabetic” and don’t need to change anything.
I am curious enough to continue researching turmeric. It is interesting to think that turmeric might have more benefits for diabetes than any of Big Pharma’s expensive drugs.

Thanks for your information.

retiredteacher

@colleenyoung

@retiredteacher In your search for evidence-based information on turmeric and its use in treating diabetes, I thought you’d appreciate this systematic review
Curcumin and Diabetes: A Systematic Review by Dong-wei Zhang et al. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3857752/
The conclusion states:
“Recent research has provided the scientific basis for “traditional” curcumin and confirmed the important role of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its associated disorders. Curcumin could favorably affect most of the leading aspects of diabetes, including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and islet apoptosis and necrosis (Figure 2). In addition, curcumin could prevent the deleterious complications of diabetes. Despite the potential tremendous benefits of this multifaceted nature product, results from clinical trials of curcumin are only available in using curcumin to treat diabetic nephropathy, microangiopathy and retinopathy so far. Studies are badly needed to be done in humans to confirm the potential of curcumin in limitation of diabetes and other associated disorders. Further, multiple approaches are also needed to overcome limited solubility and poor bioavailability of curcumin. These include synthesis of curcuminoids and development of novel formulations of curcumin, such as nanoparticles, liposomal encapsulation, emulsions, and sustained released tablets. Enhanced bioavailability and convinced clinical trial results of curcumin are likely to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of therapeutic agents for diabetes by generating a “super curcumin” in the near future.”

I found this blog about turmeric, including this article “Turmeric Dosage For Diabetes” https://www.turmericforhealth.com/turmeric-dosage/turmeric-dosage-for-diabetes. The blog also list brands, however you’ll want to do due diligence and research the validity of the claims made on the website. It is unclear who is the publisher. The article might give you a starting point to discuss with your doctor or diabetes educator.

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Curcumin (concentrated form of turmeric used in supplements) DOES have side effects. I took it for several months because of its possible anti-cancer effects and had to stop it because it radically affected my oxalate metabolism, and will facilitate the formation of kidney stones (which I have a tendency to have). When I stopped taking the curcumin, my oxalate levels went back to normal.
I have taken metformin for many years and have no side effects. Metformin is quite safe.
Turmeric, the spice, is healthy at normal levels, in curries etc… but it is not good to eat it by the teaspoonful either.

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

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Thanks @lisalucier. I stopped investigating turmeric. I read articles and found several people to talk to about it. (Not doctors, but people who have had experience with it) After weighing my situation, I decided not to take turmeric. I am hesitant to take any medicines unless I have absolute faith in the claims, and I didn’t find enough pros for this herb for me.

I continue not to have to take any meds for my diabetes2, but my blood is still high in the A.M. It goes down during the day, and then it seems that regardless of what I eat for supper, it is still high in the A.M. When I asked the endo. about that, I think I told you, he made no suggestions or comment—“just keep doing what you’re doing as numbers are really good.”

For the last weeks diabetes is not my main problem; I am having horrific personal problems that have made me feel ill and have insomnia. I don’t think there is a solution, but I am spending my time trying to find some answers. So diabetes is on the back burner for now.

I hope everyone is doing well with their diabetes and other health issues. We all have crosses to bear and then add illness and it’s like the weight of the world on our shoulders.

God bless all.

retiredteacher

@retiredteacher If you can find fresh turmeric root this is the best. I have started growing my own. Do be cautious with the turmeric as it can harm the kidneys if too much is used. Always follow the recommended dose and be sure to discuss the use of turmeric with your doctor/pharmacist. As with most things-too much of a good thing can be harmful and DO avoid the hypes. Ground can have some disgusting things and do your homework. Lot of hype on the internet as we all know. Like the line from the Gremlin’s movie, “They’re everywhere, they’re everywhere”!

I am not diabetic, but have found by eliminating some foods my inflammation has improved. We are not all alike and the best I can advise is to listen to your body and how you react to different foods.

Wishing you the best on your journey {adventure} and thank you for your input. Retirement is not always a walk in the park.

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

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Hello @retiredteacher

I am sorry to hear that personal problems are weighing you down right now. Take care of yourself!

Teresa

@parus
You have a new picture! Can you give us a little information about it? (I miss the duck, but I know variety is the spice of life!).

Teresa

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

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Hi, @retiredteacher — I echo @hopeful33250 Teresa’s message. Also hope you had a nice Thanksgiving.

Wondering how things are going with your insomnia and the personal problems you were working on?

@hopeful33250 My latest watercolor…rather summed up my attitude which needs some adjusting. Looks odd in the circular format. Yup, variety is a necessary ingredient in life. A mise en abyme in watercolor.

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

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Thanks @hopeful33250 for checking on me. Things are just not going well for now. We solved one problem, but then another one reared its ugly head. My husband has serious heart problems. This has been going on for years. He had heart caths and stents and then stents clogged up. He then had a heart attack and his aorta had calcified. So in open heart surgery he had all the arteries replaced in bypass and the aorta replaced with a cow aorta. After that, he was okay for about a year, but then the problems started again–three more caths at intervals. Now the aorta is leaking, and his blood pressure is off the charts. This is all unnerving because we have no family—just the two of us and I do not drive, so it becomes very stressful. The heart hospital and his heart doctors are over thirty miles away. We go for the cardiologist appt. next week to see what is next. They are weighing another surgery with his age (76). I don’t think there is a win either way. I stay extremely upset with his problems and can’t worry about my diabetes now. I am not staying on my diabetes program because I take care of him as best I can. I don’t know what’s coming, so we’ll just have to deal with it the best we can. My diabetes seems irrelevant compared to his heart problems.

I find myself very depressed and sad. I never thought we would have poor health in our old age. But, it started happening and has continued to build. I pray every day for us both. We have been married over 50 years. If something happens, I think the one left would not live long. I know my heart would be broken. But for now, we deal with one day at a time and try to be positive. That’s all we can do.

Bless you for you concern.

retiredteacher

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

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@retiredteacher

I am so sorry to hear of your husband’s serious heart problems. You certainly do have a lot on your plate right now! How very difficult for you both. Is he able to manage his own activities of daily living or do you have to physically help him as well?

Here at Mayo Connect we also have a Caregiver’s Support discussion group at, https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/meet-fellow-caregivers-introduce-yourself/. I believe it would help you to post there about your situation as well. The folks in the discussion group are like you and you will find a lot of support and encouragement. Scott, @IndianaScott, is the volunteer mentor of the group and you will enjoy getting to know him through his posts. Here is Scott’s Thanksgiving post, https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/thanksgiving-thanks-to-every-caregiver/

Please keep in touch, @retiredteacher, you have been part of our community for some time now and we care about you!

Teresa

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

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@retiredteacher You surely are in a difficult situation. No relatives or close friends anywhere near by? If I recall, you love living away from a lot of activity. Despite that have you considered moving closer to where there will be medical resources close by? My older cousin did that a few years back. They loved their home but with the health issues that come up as we age they made the decision to move back to an area north of Boston.
I know we all have our priorities though, so we each have to do what is right for us.
JK

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

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He is able to be active and care for himself. He simply does not do strenuous work. We have a lawn care service. He does all of the driving when we get out; which is not often—only the grocery store or to a dr. appointment. He tires easily so he sleeps and rests much of the day. So far, we have managed to not need outside help. We are very stubborn, independent people, so we always say , We are survivors, and usually find a way to make things work. I am a master at calling 911 or a taxi or to hire a driver.
Thank you for the Caregiver group info. Right now, I can only deal with heart and diabetes. If things ever get easier, I will contact them.

I cannot believe it is Dec. 1st. It was 70 degrees today! It definitely does not feel like Christmas. I hope all are enjoying the holidays.

retiredteacher

@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher — you may have seen this recent thread on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://mayocl.in/2m6abr2. If not, thought you’d be interested in it and may be interested in dialoguing with some of the members there, if you are still investigating.

Jump to this post

@retiredteacher

I am glad to hear that he is able to care for himself. I’m also glad to hear that you have some resources to help with the driving.

Keep strong!

Teresa

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