What are you reading?

Posted by alive @alive, Jan 9 8:51am

What books do you want to read this year? I’ve just gotten on a waitlist at my local library to borrow Four Thousand Weeks: Time Management for Mortals. There are 7 copies available and I’m 42nd on the list, so I should be able to get this book by the end of the year. 😂

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Just Want to Talk group.

This year I have a goal to teach myself pyrography [wood burning] So I ordered two books from abebooks.com that will hopefully get me started. I like to have a physical copy on-hand, in case I want to write in the margins or take notes. I know, I know, this is so opposite to how I grew up, leaving books in pristine/same condition.

For my birthday last year, I completed my library of the the books written by Ivan Doig. About 2013 a trial court judge turned me on to this fiction/memoir writer, and his writing style has encouraged me to "turn a word like he does!". I also have just completed getting on to my shelves the books by Jane Auel, historical fiction. The goal is to start with the oldest series and work forward.

What about this book, "4000 Weeks, Time Management for Mortals", makes you want to read it?
Ginger

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I’m reading the Lane Winslow Mystery series by Canadian Iona Whishaw. I’m getting the books from Thrift Books. When I’m done with them I give them to my reader friends.

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I am reading two books at the same time….one is fiction for entertainment and one is not but equally entertaining to me.

One of my favorite authors is Joyce Carol Oates and I basically read everything she has written. What I am reading now by her is the 20th anniversary edition of Blonde where she reimagines the inner poetic and spiritual life of Norma Jeane Baker as a child, a woman and a celebrity known as Marilyn Monroe. I love the behind the scenes of old Hollywood and the Blonde mystique surrounding Hollywood at that time. It depicts the manipulative and harsh realities of show business without naming too many names.

The other book is called Food Fix by Dr Mark Hyman and is equally fascinating. What we eat has tremendous implications not just for our health but for the planet, society and global economy. Dr Hyman explains how our food and agriculture policies and influenced by money and lobbies and shows the resulting spread of obesity, chronic disease, climate change, poverty, violence, social injustice etc. He doesn't pull any punches and I believe this book will change the way you think about and eat food….a real eye opener with pages of references.

The first book is because of the author and Marilyn Monroe's always fascinating history. The second book is because I am passionate about what we eat and am appalled at the lengths the Food, Tobacco and Big Pharma go to for greed with no thought to the devastation their policies cause.

And, by the way, although I do read digital books, I love the feel of a book in my hand that I can cart around anywhere.

Ah soapbox again

FL Mary

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I’m reading A Shooting Star – A Horse-racing Tale by Richard Fox. It was copyrighted by the author in 2009 (iUniverse).

Even though I’ve never paid attention to horse-racing to date, I’ve found it interesting to learn how this doctor from my past liked to spend his idle time. He was a great man in my book.

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"Live Younger Longer" by Dr Stephen Kopecky, M.D, published in 2021

Dr. Kopecky is cancer survivor and cardiologist at Mayo.

Practical and common sense approach to healthy living. I like his approach , he explains what happens to your body as result of not making healthy choices. He does not lecture, he explains. His approach is small steps, simple changes to create new habits.
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Laurie

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I just finished reading Haben, A Memoir by Haben Girma. Haben is a deaf/blind woman who was the first deaf/blind student to graduate from Harvard Law School. Haben was of course, intelligent, but also very insightful in dealing with her disabilities and brings the reader to the conclusion that we must also take a second look at how we treat people who are different than us. This book was an eye-opener and one that everyone can learn from.

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I'm currently reading 3 books (I don't usually do this!). Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doer, The Firebrand and the First Lady, by Patricia Bell-Scott, and Homeland Elegies by Ayad Akhtar. I'm waiting for the Arrival of Alexander McCall Smith's latest novel in the 44 Scotland Street series.

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@sparklegram

I'm currently reading 3 books (I don't usually do this!). Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doer, The Firebrand and the First Lady, by Patricia Bell-Scott, and Homeland Elegies by Ayad Akhtar. I'm waiting for the Arrival of Alexander McCall Smith's latest novel in the 44 Scotland Street series.

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I am reading my way through 3 of Jodi Picoult's novels; she is very good! I also like John Grissom, but have read all of his. Lots of snow on the ground and I live on a little dead-end road, so no snow-plow. It's ok anyway as I don't mind being housebound, long as I have books to read!!!

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@dorisjeanne

I have read and liked several of John Grissom novels and loved Jodi Picoult’s “ My sister’s Keeper”. They are both prolific authors and easy reading. Nothing like a good book on a snowy day or, here in Florida, a dreary rainy day,

FL Mary

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I am writing. I am just finishing a kids book, "The Crud Box…an Inventors Supply Kit" It teaches kids how to dream up design and make their own toys out of "Crud".

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@hopeful33250

I just finished reading Haben, A Memoir by Haben Girma. Haben is a deaf/blind woman who was the first deaf/blind student to graduate from Harvard Law School. Haben was of course, intelligent, but also very insightful in dealing with her disabilities and brings the reader to the conclusion that we must also take a second look at how we treat people who are different than us. This book was an eye-opener and one that everyone can learn from.

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I have Epilepsy. The sizures were not under controle untill I was35. My daughter had autisum, C,P. ceribal paulsey, scoileses, and a fused hip. She spent 3 years in a crippled childerns hospital. When her father threw her out in the street I took her in. I made her go to college. Only 1 class a term. That was where she found her nitch. She was soon invited to join the Houner Scocity. It was all A's and B's. She graduated with hounors. She was a published author, she had writen her own childrens book "The Old House" She died at the age of 48. The doctors told me she would not live to be 35. So much for praticeing medicne.
When I meet someone with a disabiled child I tell them about Suzyn. I tell them "NRVER GIVE UP. Who cares what you cannot do. Focuse on what you can do! AND Never Give UP!!
Suzyn znd I are Proof YES WE CAN!!!

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@imallears

@dorisjeanne

I have read and liked several of John Grissom novels and loved Jodi Picoult’s “ My sister’s Keeper”. They are both prolific authors and easy reading. Nothing like a good book on a snowy day or, here in Florida, a dreary rainy day,

FL Mary

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I am finishing another Picoult book: The Pact. It's a love story, but a very different one!!! I had to make myself put it down and go to bed last night!!! Still lots of snow on the ground here, but melted off the trees, at least.

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