We’ve come a long way baby! How grateful are you?

Posted by Chris, Volunteer Mentor @auntieoakley, Aug 6 11:28am

In the last 100 years breast cancer treatments have gone from “don’t bother”, to radical mastectomies only, and everyone gets chemo, through many advancements, and now we are at a place where 80% survive to live, and eventually die from something else.
We stand on the shoulders of every researcher, doctor, advocate and every woman who ever heard “you have breast cancer”.
Please share your positive feelings of gratitude for how far we have come. What are you most grateful for?

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Breast Cancer group.

Wonderful post Chris! Thank you for your message of hope! And the success of breast cancer research and treatment.

REPLY

I am very grateful for being alive 30 years after breast cancer diagnosis, being able to see my children grow up!

REPLY
@astaingegerdm

I am very grateful for being alive 30 years after breast cancer diagnosis, being able to see my children grow up!

Jump to this post

I am super grateful for the almost 18 years for myself. Also very gratified when I read about women who only had lumpectomy and endocrine therapy. No chemo, no radiation…………………fantastic!

REPLY

I'm grateful for everyone working to stop this cancer from affecting 1 in 8 women in their lifetimes. So I'm grateful for the researchers from myriad disciplines sharing what they learn to try to decode, prevent, fight and treat breast, and other, cancers. And grateful for the medical practitioners who chose this area of medicine to specialize in.

I'm very grateful for the thousands of people willing to participate in studies that advance understanding of cancer, many of whom did so at great inconvenience and often while ill themselves.

I'm also grateful for those fighting for a less toxic environment and soils as I believe that both are factors that can negatively affect our immune systems and will be found to play a role in U.S. cancer rates.

REPLY

I'm grateful for the wonderful care I got that ended about a year ago. The caregivers for my chemo and radiation were wonderful. My oncologist was also.
I'm grateful for the daughter who came and stayed with me for 2 months when I felt so horrible she kept looking in on me to see if I was still alive.
I'm grateful for my 4 children who take care of my property , buy my groceries for me and invite me to parties.
I'm grateful for my two cats that snuggle with me all the time and my parrot who shrieks when the Ride-On bus arrives to take me somewhere, to let me know they are there.
I'm grateful for the Cancer Society that pays for my bus rides to medical appointments.
I'm grateful for the 22 beautiful oak studded acres I live on, and will, until I can no longer live alone.
I'm grateful for the elation I felt 3 days ago when my grocery cart got away from me in the parking lot and I sprinted after it like a 40 year old. (I'm 80 and not long ago I was propping myself up against buildings when I went on a walking tour in Seattle.)
I'm grateful for everything and everyone that has helped me on this journey. For you guys here too, whose wonderful advise I look for.

REPLY
@raebaby

I'm grateful for the wonderful care I got that ended about a year ago. The caregivers for my chemo and radiation were wonderful. My oncologist was also.
I'm grateful for the daughter who came and stayed with me for 2 months when I felt so horrible she kept looking in on me to see if I was still alive.
I'm grateful for my 4 children who take care of my property , buy my groceries for me and invite me to parties.
I'm grateful for my two cats that snuggle with me all the time and my parrot who shrieks when the Ride-On bus arrives to take me somewhere, to let me know they are there.
I'm grateful for the Cancer Society that pays for my bus rides to medical appointments.
I'm grateful for the 22 beautiful oak studded acres I live on, and will, until I can no longer live alone.
I'm grateful for the elation I felt 3 days ago when my grocery cart got away from me in the parking lot and I sprinted after it like a 40 year old. (I'm 80 and not long ago I was propping myself up against buildings when I went on a walking tour in Seattle.)
I'm grateful for everything and everyone that has helped me on this journey. For you guys here too, whose wonderful advise I look for.

Jump to this post

Thank you for posting all of this! What a wonderful exercise in gratitude for life. I also have a few parrots that shriek at me when something is amiss. It warms my heart to read your story.
Are you feeling mostly healthy again now?

REPLY
@auntieoakley

Thank you for posting all of this! What a wonderful exercise in gratitude for life. I also have a few parrots that shriek at me when something is amiss. It warms my heart to read your story.
Are you feeling mostly healthy again now?

Jump to this post

I feel great now! My only real problem is the neuropathy in my feet that keeps me from driving. I'm working on it. My parrot is now 30 years old. Kind of a little monster, but real smart. He doesn't talk, but at night he climbs into his cage and closes the door with his foot.
Chris, you are one of the people that I am grateful for!

REPLY
@raebaby

I feel great now! My only real problem is the neuropathy in my feet that keeps me from driving. I'm working on it. My parrot is now 30 years old. Kind of a little monster, but real smart. He doesn't talk, but at night he climbs into his cage and closes the door with his foot.
Chris, you are one of the people that I am grateful for!

Jump to this post

And grateful to you too, auntieoakley.

REPLY

I forgot to mention one thing I feel very thankful for; my new curly hair. They are chemo curls, but the best hair I have ever had in my 80 year old life. I'm getting my first haircut this week!

REPLY

I am grateful to be 2 1/2 yrs out from treatments from advanced breast cancer and still here to greet each sunrise, hug my hubby, love on my family. So grateful !

REPLY
@callalloo

I'm grateful for everyone working to stop this cancer from affecting 1 in 8 women in their lifetimes. So I'm grateful for the researchers from myriad disciplines sharing what they learn to try to decode, prevent, fight and treat breast, and other, cancers. And grateful for the medical practitioners who chose this area of medicine to specialize in.

I'm very grateful for the thousands of people willing to participate in studies that advance understanding of cancer, many of whom did so at great inconvenience and often while ill themselves.

I'm also grateful for those fighting for a less toxic environment and soils as I believe that both are factors that can negatively affect our immune systems and will be found to play a role in U.S. cancer rates.

Jump to this post

I meant to include that I'm grateful that breast cancer, as perturbing as it is, is not the assumed death sentence it was in the not too distant past. A friend asked what Olivia Newton-John's death meant to me, having recently had a lumpectomy for breast cancer. I said that aside from the dismay and compassion for the pain and discomfort she suffered, my take-away is that someone can live 30 years after an initial, aggressive cancer and have a life of continuing value! That is not the breast cancer experience I heard about growing up and is already a game-changer. I watched a Netflix feature and the actress Toni Collete revealed a partial mastectomy while changing clothes. It wasn't alluded to, or part of the plot or significant in any way. Just a woman, who'd had to have surgery for something, and otherwise living her life. That is,, cancer was a responsibility to address in a life; but not the life. As with the moderators here dealing with various conditions, some very difficult or limiting, and nonetheless living lives with focus and joy. That example means a great deal to me.

REPLY

Grateful for early detection and Mayo Clinic. I remember breast cancer as a death sentence, and lost several relatives to this disease. Grateful today for an excellent prognosis and hopeful to live out the rest of my life cancer-free. Blessings to all. ❤️

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment