Chronic Pain members - Welcome, please introduce yourself

Posted by Kelsey Mohring @kelseydm, Apr 27, 2016

Welcome to the new Chronic Pain group.

I’m Kelsey and I’m the moderator of the group. I look forwarding to welcoming you and introducing you to other members. Feel free to browse the topics or start a new one.

Why not take a minute and introduce yourself.

@eddougher

Given the dates on the most recent posts, it appears as if this blog might be discontinued but just in case I’ll give it a try anyway. My name is Ed, I’m 56 and live with my partner of 15 years in NYC. I have been dealing with progressive, adhesive arachnoiditis and radiculopathy for most of the past 7-10 years. It’s a long story which I’ll go into if someone asks me to but suffice it to say that it’s not clear whether my pain is the result of failed back surgery and more than 20 spinal punctures for epidurals or from the original injury (Dec 1995) which ended up needing to be fixed with L3-S1 fusion (May 2005) which then had hardware failure complications and was redone two months later (Jul 2005).

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@eddougher

It can be confusing, trying to figure out when conversations take place. I participate in several of them, on various subjects. I had a spinal cord stimulator implant a couple of months ago, for peripheral neuropathy pain in my feet and numbness there and other places. My pain has been reduced from 6-8, down to 1-4, though it does spike sometimes when I do much walking. I think that the stimulator is especially suited to back pain.

There’s ongoing discussion about the many treatments out there for chronic pain, and as others have said, you can find discussions specific to your medical issues. Welcome to Connect. I’ve learned a lot here, and have appreciated the support.

Jim

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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I went to a relatively small private college and have a BA in music (piano) and Bible. I’ve made good use of both sides of the degree.

Jim

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Jim, How can you say you love DiLaudid ? It is like saying you like pain. Can you please describe in what way do LOVE DiLaudid? Marield65

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@hazelblumberg and @jimhd, it’s a small world!

@jimhd… I grew up around Geneseo and now live in Rochester (Chili)’ I’m not far from Brockport at all. And… I went to college in Fredonia, which is super-close to Jamestown.

@hazelblumberg… the pharmacist I work with the most here in Rochester for my drug polymorphisms is actually from the Utica area. (He and I are co-authoring a book for patients about drug metabolism and polymorphisms.)

It’s funny because I go to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Almost every doctor I have there has told me that their luggage has been accidentally routed to Rochester, NY instead of Rochester, MN while flying through O’Hare. Unfortunately, our airport here is accustomed to re-routing Mayo Clinic patients who end up here in ROC accidentally due to airline booking errors.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@contentandwell, just be conscientious while using omeprazole and if you start feeling wonky, talk to your doctor. All PPIs are not created equally, and omeprazole is the worse inhibitor of the CYP2C19 enzyme for some reason.

I’ve read that long-term use of PPIs contributes to bone density issues also. My mom has pre-dementia symptoms, and her neurologist told her to avoid NSAIDS because it also negatively affects dementia.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@marield65, yes, the second set I did via OneOme was a larger number of tests and also much less expensive. Mayo/OneOme have been diligently working on lowering the prices of these tests and making them more widely-available. I assume that the reason that doctors out there are generally unaware of these polymorphisms is because historically, no one gets these tests done due to lack of availability and cost. Hopefully, having institutions like this working to make the tests cheaper and more easily available will then assist with industry knowledge.

Ahhhh… Dilaudid. I hate that drug, and here’s why… the enzyme that metabolizes dilaudid in me has a polymorphism that slows-down metabolism. We assume this is why for years, every time I had a surgery and I was given Dilaudid beforehand, it takes me at least six hours longer than normal to wake up, and I’m extremely groggy for a long time after I finally do wake up. (This reaction also happens to my brother, so I assume that he has this enzyme polymorphism, too.)

For my past two surgeries, I asked the hospitals to NOT give it to me telling them why, and they both agreed (a hospital here at home and last October at Mayo). So, I’ve actually gotten to see the behind-the-scenes stuff like being rolled into the operating room, moving myself onto the very narrow table, the cold temp of the room, watching them put my arms into place, watching them place the mask over my face, etc. This is all stuff that patients do but never recall if given Dilaudid pre-surgery while in pre-op.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@hazelblumberg first class of females at Colgate!?!? Woot!!!!

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Kdubois:Marield65 here. Thanks for getting back so quickly. How would I get in touch with One Ome? Do they test you for specific meds? Or what is in the med.Thanks Marie

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Hi @marield65, at this point, only doctors can place orders with OneOme. I apologize if you mentioned it already, but which state do you live in? I want to ensure that OneOme has been certified by the state in which you live. (Each PGx testing company needs to be certified by each of state to be able to provide mail order kits to residents of the state, or the doctor ordering needs to be practicing in a state that has certified the PGx company if the patient lives in an uncertified state.)

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Hi Kdubois, this is Marie from Rhode Island. Can you tell me if this state does it?

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@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@marield65… YES… OneOme is certified in Rhode Island through 12/30/2018. (https://oneome.com/licensing)

To order, ask your doctor to go to OneOme.com and click the For Providers link at the top of the page.

You can also go to the site and click the For Patients link to read more about it.

I just realized that I never answered your question above regarding testing for specific meds. The industry already knows which genes metabolize which medications. PGx companies analyze your genes to determine if there are polymorphisms that make you metabolize a drug normally, too slowly, or too quickly. The report received after testing tells you several things… it tells you whether the gene tested came back normal or polymorphic, and if it was found to be polymorphic, they can also tell the metabolizer status for the gene. (For instance, for some of my enzymes, I’m an Intermediate metabolizer, which means my metabolism is basically a notch slower than Normal. For one of my enzymes, I’m a Poor, which is like being two notches slower than normal. For another enzyme, I’m two notches faster than Normal but only if the enzyme is induced to do so by another drug, food, or supplement.)

So on the report, the cover page list drugs in a red-colored section. These are drugs that are to be “used with great caution” based on the polymorphisms. (Basically, these are the “do not take” drugs.) They then provide a yellow-colored drug list… these are to be “used with caution” based on polymorphisms. So, the reports do give you guidelines regarding which drugs will work better or not work as well for you as an individual. They aren’t able to list comprehensively because there are so many drugs out there, so after the first few pages, they list your polymorphisms, which can then be used to determine additional drugs by doctors but usually pharmacists on an as-needed basis.

Every time a doctor wants to prescribe a new drug for me, I tell them to send it in to the pharmacy, but they know that before the prescription is filled, my pharmacy and I will review the drug against my polymorphisms to determine if I am able to take the drug. If we decide that it is not a good drug for me, then they know that my pharmacist will be calling them with guidelines to choose a different drug.

Unfortunately, pharmacy computer systems are not currently capable of accepting a patient’s polymorphisms as input and then compare evaluate them against drugs, so we have to do this manually each time. Fortunately, most pharmacies have subscriptions to clinicalpharmacology.com and other web site, which is where we find this information, called pharmacokinetics.

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@boourbonman

I promised you all I would let you know when I got approved for Medical Marijuana. Judi and I did it. We then went down to Edgewater FL. and got two 500 mg bottles. $70 each. So we were suppose to start with 5 drops (each drop is a mg.) three times a day and slowly work up to 10 drops 3 times a day. Do the math. 16 days for $70. We are both at 5 drops 3 times a day and no relief. I sure hope it starts to ease our pain. Will Keep you posted.
Hoot

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HI @artscaping, what does MM stand for? Sorry for my ignonorance. I tried looking up the first oil, but had no luck of any way of ordering it. It sounds wonderful. Do you know how I could get either one of these?
Thanks

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@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@marield65

It’s the best, quickest acting pain medication in the ER, for me.

Jim

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

Jump to this post

@jimhd Jim, as I mentioned somewhere before I had problems with many pharmaceuticals when I had cirrhosis. I had been prescribed prednisone two times, at this point I know I had cirrhosis at those times but it was not too advanced. The first time the prednisone worked well for me. The second time I still did not know I had cirrhosis and the cirrhosis worked well and did what it was supposed to do but I gained a ton of weight in 10 days. I also had oxycontin and loved it because I would just take it at bedtime to lessen the pain from a knee replacement and that allowed me to sleep, in fact helped me to sleep as I guess it does with most people.

When my cirrhosis progressed I had trouble with many, many drugs. Oxycontin and oxycodone kept me awake, literally wide awake, staring at the ceiling until around 6:00 in the morning. That was when my medical oncologist prescribed dilaudid, and that was worse. Also, as I mentioned I had trouble with omeprazole. Long after those problems I finally discovered that cirrhosis often causes drug intolerances. I suspect if I had dilaudid now I would be fine with it. Honestly, cirrhosis effects more things than I ever dreamed possible, that darned liver sure does a lot.
JK

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@kdubois Thanks Kelly, so far I am fine with the omeprazole. Due to what I hear are long term effects I am hoping that my dosage will be reduced soon. I am also wondering if somehow I had something in my esophagus that was actually related to varices and that maybe I do not actually have Barrett’s. They tell that would be unlikely but I am hoping for an endoscopy soon just to be sure.

I cannot take any NSAIDS, no non-prescription pain relievers other than tylenol, and that in a limited dose. Thankfully I am not in pain frequently and the horrible migraines I had prior to menopause are gone now.
JK

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