Tough diagnosis: Anyone else diagnosed with Recruitment?

Posted by Bill Gebhardt @billgebhardt, Aug 20, 2020

First step towards an implant is a little overwhelming. In the doctor’s words, albeit heavily edited.

“So, you have, what is called recruitment.
Well just the most important thing to know about a cochlear implant is that it’s not a quick fix. After surgery that ear is pretty much wiped out. So, you can’t really hear for about eight weeks until you’re activated with the implant.
… when the implant is turned on. you will not be able to understand speech for a couple of months. You will have the ability to understand environmental sounds, those will develop first with listening practice over 12 to 18 months you can develop speech, understanding. The reason this may be an option for you is that it goes through a different method of transmission. Right now, hearing aids are acoustic and implant is electrical stimulation to your nerve. If it’s at the level of the inner ear, that’s causing this recruitment. We’re essentially not going through there. For stimulation to the nerve electrically. So it’s possible we can get you access to what you’re missing through a different mode of stimulation.”

Anybody had a similar Dx?
Bill

Who told you it would be 8 weeks between surgery and activation? In most cases it's 2-3 weeks. Do you understand some speech now with hearing aids? If so, you will probably understand speech in a relatively short time after activation. It may not sound normal to you, but it will become normal for you in time. That time is not necessarily 12 – 18 months. For me it was about a month, but I worked hard on the aural rehabilitation part of that. I'm also curious about what is meant by a 'different form of stimulation'? Hearing aids and cochlear implants are definitely two very different means of helping a hard of hearing person cope with hearing loss. It seems you've received a lot of negativity. I hope for better news than that.

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As I read the Dr.s comments, particularly the last three sentences , this is not a conventional Implant.

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@billgebhardt

As I read the Dr.s comments, particularly the last three sentences , this is not a conventional Implant.

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Since Julie's comment, I have done a little more digging into recruitment/implant and inclined to suspect my source may be an intern with little experience in Dx and treatment. More to follow. Bill

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Having done a little more research on this issue, I suspect the Dr. was painting a worst case scenario. Recruitment is a lot more common than I concluded. So, I am quite comfortable with an implant. Time to close this discussion. Bill

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Good luck to you Bill.

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A funny thing happened on the way to surgery. Actually, it was during the pre-surgery conference when the surgeon gave me an eye-opener. The cause of my sudden loss of hearing a year ago is a neuropathy that I inherited most likely from my mother. I thought I would share this information so others with CMT might benefit. Charcot Marie Tooth, (3 Doctors back in1886) is the original name and still most common in the medical world. Now it is bundled into Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy. It damages the peripheral nerves by compromising the axon core, or the myelin sheath, (probably more information than you wanted). However, all those nerves in the hearing process are not exempt. So, if you or anyone you know has CMT, pass on this information.

As for me, I am now the proud owner of two Cochlear™ Nucleus® 7 sound processors and all the accessories that come with them. Surgery was in early November, activation in early December, and with some struggle, I can understand my wife when she asks me to take out the garbage. Still, a long way to go before I give up my Otter™.

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@billgebhardt

A funny thing happened on the way to surgery. Actually, it was during the pre-surgery conference when the surgeon gave me an eye-opener. The cause of my sudden loss of hearing a year ago is a neuropathy that I inherited most likely from my mother. I thought I would share this information so others with CMT might benefit. Charcot Marie Tooth, (3 Doctors back in1886) is the original name and still most common in the medical world. Now it is bundled into Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy. It damages the peripheral nerves by compromising the axon core, or the myelin sheath, (probably more information than you wanted). However, all those nerves in the hearing process are not exempt. So, if you or anyone you know has CMT, pass on this information.

As for me, I am now the proud owner of two Cochlear™ Nucleus® 7 sound processors and all the accessories that come with them. Surgery was in early November, activation in early December, and with some struggle, I can understand my wife when she asks me to take out the garbage. Still, a long way to go before I give up my Otter™.

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@billgebhardt
Very happy to hear of your success with the implants. I’m sure your wife is happy too. Would love to know when, if ever, you feel you can give up the hearing apps.

Happy and safe New Year from FL Mary.

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@billgebhardt

A funny thing happened on the way to surgery. Actually, it was during the pre-surgery conference when the surgeon gave me an eye-opener. The cause of my sudden loss of hearing a year ago is a neuropathy that I inherited most likely from my mother. I thought I would share this information so others with CMT might benefit. Charcot Marie Tooth, (3 Doctors back in1886) is the original name and still most common in the medical world. Now it is bundled into Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy. It damages the peripheral nerves by compromising the axon core, or the myelin sheath, (probably more information than you wanted). However, all those nerves in the hearing process are not exempt. So, if you or anyone you know has CMT, pass on this information.

As for me, I am now the proud owner of two Cochlear™ Nucleus® 7 sound processors and all the accessories that come with them. Surgery was in early November, activation in early December, and with some struggle, I can understand my wife when she asks me to take out the garbage. Still, a long way to go before I give up my Otter™.

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Happy to hear of your CI success! It's definitely a 'step up' in life when it comes to relationships! Did you get the Mini mic 2+ with your accessories? It's my favorite anytime there's background noise, especially in social settings. I hope it keeps getting better. Thank you for posting your experience.

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Yes, I have the Mic, TV streamer, and phone clip. But too early to use them. Still working on identifying words. And all this is on the right ear. The left ear is not salvageable.

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DId your CI audiologist activate the telecoil in the N7 processor? A basic neckloop might connect you to audio (computer, phone, iPad, etc. if that's activated. Some don't activate it, others do. Mine was activated and I used the neckloop to listen to audio books within a few weeks of activation. It was very clear, very fast. Loved it. That was 15 years ago before the current accessories were available. Even now, I prefer using the neckloop with telecoil with my iPhone. Love the mini mic though. Don't know why you'd need the phone clip with the N7 as it's supposed to direct stream. Lots to learn. I was lucky to have learned a lot prior to getting my CI. Thanks to HLAA.

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Cochlear.com calls it Phone Clip, something one would wear on a neck lanyard that picks up the audio and sends it via Bluetooth to the processor.
I am still working out the issue thinking Blue Tooth direct to Processor. All of this is premature since I have had the processor all of 10 days and can not understand words enough to carry on a conversation.
Bill

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@billgebhardt

Cochlear.com calls it Phone Clip, something one would wear on a neck lanyard that picks up the audio and sends it via Bluetooth to the processor.
I am still working out the issue thinking Blue Tooth direct to Processor. All of this is premature since I have had the processor all of 10 days and can not understand words enough to carry on a conversation.
Bill

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We will be interested to see how you progress with all the technology. I have the N6 processor, which doesn't have the automatic BT connect to the phone, thus the need for the phone clip. I didn't think the N7 needed the phone clip. We will all learn with and from you!

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