Tips on minimising withdrawal symptoms from Effexor (aka Venlafaxine)

Posted by richyrich @richyrich, Nov 2, 2016

I have been taking Effexor/Venlafaxine for years and tried to get off it a few times but each time I try to give up the chemical withdrawal symptoms are a horror story and I give up giving up. Anyone got any tips or tried and tested strategies? Thank you

Liked by Bek, LynneB, kelly76, echams1 ... see all

@brightwings

Ok, I am starting to prepare to leave for my ceremony, tribe and family. I have decided not to camp for the night. 47 degrees is too cold for these old bones…
My intention for today is
1 To find a nice, affordable place to live with all my belongings intact
2. Decrease anxiety
3. Have a peaceful month
4. Assist me in relearning my mandolin chords and how to strum the different rhythms again.
5. Decrease MS relapse.
.
You all have a great day cuz I know I am going to. Bright Wings

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Thank you for having great days on purpose! Yesterday was a ton of crying. Today I’m going to keep busy! Visiting poor old mom since yesterday. She in no way wants to move to this very expensive assisted living place. Ha! How cliche!

Sigh. So, Last night I did her toes, hands, shower, hair, vacuum, mopped (wet swifter) and 6 tubs of laundry. Now she’s my mother!

Yeah, I don’t have to, but I can’t deal when she’s dirty and a wreck. Plus she says she feels better. She
Oughta!

But I feel better too knowing that the pee on her bathroom rug has been washed!

For everything there is a season!

Have good days on purpose everyone!

@secretwhitepop

Thank you for having great days on purpose! Yesterday was a ton of crying. Today I’m going to keep busy! Visiting poor old mom since yesterday. She in no way wants to move to this very expensive assisted living place. Ha! How cliche!

Sigh. So, Last night I did her toes, hands, shower, hair, vacuum, mopped (wet swifter) and 6 tubs of laundry. Now she’s my mother!

Yeah, I don’t have to, but I can’t deal when she’s dirty and a wreck. Plus she says she feels better. She
Oughta!

But I feel better too knowing that the pee on her bathroom rug has been washed!

For everything there is a season!

Have good days on purpose everyone!

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@secretwhitepop it takes a tremendous amount of physical mental and emotional energy to step into the role of caregiver for your parent. I cared for my MIL for a year until she passed away. Neither of her daughters would take her in and that was a sad situation. I believe I still haven't fully recovered from the experience. Now my own parents are aging and each time I visit I realize the inevitability of changes in the future. My mom hurt her knee last time I was there and taking care of her and my dad woke me up to the fact that I'm in no shape to be in that role, and I need to focus on building my physical strength back. I applaud you for all that you're doing for your mom. It is not easy. Have a good day today and allow those tears to flow. We are here for you!

@secretwhitepop

Thank you for having great days on purpose! Yesterday was a ton of crying. Today I’m going to keep busy! Visiting poor old mom since yesterday. She in no way wants to move to this very expensive assisted living place. Ha! How cliche!

Sigh. So, Last night I did her toes, hands, shower, hair, vacuum, mopped (wet swifter) and 6 tubs of laundry. Now she’s my mother!

Yeah, I don’t have to, but I can’t deal when she’s dirty and a wreck. Plus she says she feels better. She
Oughta!

But I feel better too knowing that the pee on her bathroom rug has been washed!

For everything there is a season!

Have good days on purpose everyone!

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@secretwhitepop– It's so difficult and heartbreaking to have to take care of the people who took care of us. Don't you think? Cleanliness is so important to help stave off infections too. When I took care of my mom, I had help, she was bathed everyday that she could get out of bed. She had Parkinson. Feeling good after doing all that for your mom must make you feel so good! Good for you.
Do you have other siblings that help you? Do you have a good relationship with your mom?
Why were you crying? My mom and I never really had a great relationship. But I never have been sorry that I helped take care of her.

@merpreb

@secretwhitepop– It's so difficult and heartbreaking to have to take care of the people who took care of us. Don't you think? Cleanliness is so important to help stave off infections too. When I took care of my mom, I had help, she was bathed everyday that she could get out of bed. She had Parkinson. Feeling good after doing all that for your mom must make you feel so good! Good for you.
Do you have other siblings that help you? Do you have a good relationship with your mom?
Why were you crying? My mom and I never really had a great relationship. But I never have been sorry that I helped take care of her.

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Hi there! Mostly I cry when I first see her because when she is sad it breaks my heart. Also, I haven’t been the happiest or strongest person this past year after my fathers passing. I think I’m still in denial. Frozen in time. And mom misses the love of her life too. So, it’s hard to stay upbeat. And I want her to be more cared for so that when I visit we can just goof around. And I won’t worry that there’s pee in her 🙂

Yes, I agree about hygiene. She is sporting a broken tooth! My brother is doing a great job in caring for her everyday, but we are all so so busy.

Get this, though, I am now at my mother in laws house and am at peace. I called mom to check in and she is listening to the Pope. All is well. I am at peace.

@sandij

@secretwhitepop it takes a tremendous amount of physical mental and emotional energy to step into the role of caregiver for your parent. I cared for my MIL for a year until she passed away. Neither of her daughters would take her in and that was a sad situation. I believe I still haven't fully recovered from the experience. Now my own parents are aging and each time I visit I realize the inevitability of changes in the future. My mom hurt her knee last time I was there and taking care of her and my dad woke me up to the fact that I'm in no shape to be in that role, and I need to focus on building my physical strength back. I applaud you for all that you're doing for your mom. It is not easy. Have a good day today and allow those tears to flow. We are here for you!

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You are one of those people that shod put here as a reflection of Him! Yes, I cried so much yesterday but today I see joy in small things. (I hope it sticks!)

I see how very fortunate I am and was to have a great family (whether is was or not, right this minute it was great. So there!)

Reading The Power I’d Now. Can you tell? But only on page 15! Ha!

@secretwhitepop

Hi there! Mostly I cry when I first see her because when she is sad it breaks my heart. Also, I haven’t been the happiest or strongest person this past year after my fathers passing. I think I’m still in denial. Frozen in time. And mom misses the love of her life too. So, it’s hard to stay upbeat. And I want her to be more cared for so that when I visit we can just goof around. And I won’t worry that there’s pee in her 🙂

Yes, I agree about hygiene. She is sporting a broken tooth! My brother is doing a great job in caring for her everyday, but we are all so so busy.

Get this, though, I am now at my mother in laws house and am at peace. I called mom to check in and she is listening to the Pope. All is well. I am at peace.

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Hi!
It is very difficult when we, the child, become the caregiver of our parents.
My father ran a one-man business.
Although it was small, he made what he needed and when my brother and I moved out, his business took off and he had way more than he ever hoped for.
My mother took care of everything that had to do with the house.
She paid the bills, not only household bills, but the day to day bills for my father's business.

My mother was my dad's love of his life, too!
When she died, he fell apart.
As far as I am concerned, he had a breakdown.
He let his business go to pot and lost it.
He would go over to the cemetary each and every day.
When my sister-in-law and I went to clean out my mom's things, we noticed that she tried to prepare my dad for her death.
Everything was organized and labeled, even the desk.

A friend convinced my dad to go down to Florida for a while to try to clear his head (that never happened).
It was really a great idea since he had lots of friends there and his brother and 3 sisters, as well as my mother's family.
Only people missing was me and my family and my brother and his family.

He never got over my mother and survivied her more than 20 years, which is ironic because he was always the sick one with heart issues and she was always the healthy one until cancer got her. She had lung cancer (non smoker) and it was my dad who smoked for years.

Bottom line, we all grieve differently. Some scream and shout, close themselves off, listen to sad songs, moves, gets things together and moves on, etc. The grieving process lasts as long as it needs to. My dad never stopped grieveing. As for me, I still think of her all the time, but now I think of the sweet times. I still grieve my dad, too, but not the one who never got over my mom, but the dad who used to take me to work with him.

Allow youself the time you need. Keep an eye on Mom, but let her grieve her way, too.

Wishing you peace and peace of mind!
Ronnie (GRANDMAr)

@grandmar

Hi!
It is very difficult when we, the child, become the caregiver of our parents.
My father ran a one-man business.
Although it was small, he made what he needed and when my brother and I moved out, his business took off and he had way more than he ever hoped for.
My mother took care of everything that had to do with the house.
She paid the bills, not only household bills, but the day to day bills for my father's business.

My mother was my dad's love of his life, too!
When she died, he fell apart.
As far as I am concerned, he had a breakdown.
He let his business go to pot and lost it.
He would go over to the cemetary each and every day.
When my sister-in-law and I went to clean out my mom's things, we noticed that she tried to prepare my dad for her death.
Everything was organized and labeled, even the desk.

A friend convinced my dad to go down to Florida for a while to try to clear his head (that never happened).
It was really a great idea since he had lots of friends there and his brother and 3 sisters, as well as my mother's family.
Only people missing was me and my family and my brother and his family.

He never got over my mother and survivied her more than 20 years, which is ironic because he was always the sick one with heart issues and she was always the healthy one until cancer got her. She had lung cancer (non smoker) and it was my dad who smoked for years.

Bottom line, we all grieve differently. Some scream and shout, close themselves off, listen to sad songs, moves, gets things together and moves on, etc. The grieving process lasts as long as it needs to. My dad never stopped grieveing. As for me, I still think of her all the time, but now I think of the sweet times. I still grieve my dad, too, but not the one who never got over my mom, but the dad who used to take me to work with him.

Allow youself the time you need. Keep an eye on Mom, but let her grieve her way, too.

Wishing you peace and peace of mind!
Ronnie (GRANDMAr)

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Thanks GrandmaR. Sounds like you had wonderful parents. Lots of love.

@grandmar

Hi!
It is very difficult when we, the child, become the caregiver of our parents.
My father ran a one-man business.
Although it was small, he made what he needed and when my brother and I moved out, his business took off and he had way more than he ever hoped for.
My mother took care of everything that had to do with the house.
She paid the bills, not only household bills, but the day to day bills for my father's business.

My mother was my dad's love of his life, too!
When she died, he fell apart.
As far as I am concerned, he had a breakdown.
He let his business go to pot and lost it.
He would go over to the cemetary each and every day.
When my sister-in-law and I went to clean out my mom's things, we noticed that she tried to prepare my dad for her death.
Everything was organized and labeled, even the desk.

A friend convinced my dad to go down to Florida for a while to try to clear his head (that never happened).
It was really a great idea since he had lots of friends there and his brother and 3 sisters, as well as my mother's family.
Only people missing was me and my family and my brother and his family.

He never got over my mother and survivied her more than 20 years, which is ironic because he was always the sick one with heart issues and she was always the healthy one until cancer got her. She had lung cancer (non smoker) and it was my dad who smoked for years.

Bottom line, we all grieve differently. Some scream and shout, close themselves off, listen to sad songs, moves, gets things together and moves on, etc. The grieving process lasts as long as it needs to. My dad never stopped grieveing. As for me, I still think of her all the time, but now I think of the sweet times. I still grieve my dad, too, but not the one who never got over my mom, but the dad who used to take me to work with him.

Allow youself the time you need. Keep an eye on Mom, but let her grieve her way, too.

Wishing you peace and peace of mind!
Ronnie (GRANDMAr)

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@grandmar
Those are very wise words…

I am back from my ceremony…so much healing..I have 4 more children of my heart. I am so grateful. And so happy.
.
When I am having a hard day, I learned to recognize a moment of happiness and I put it in my pocket. Then the same with the next good moment, into my pocket it goes…
At the end of the day, I pull out those good moments, tiny as they might be and realize, in spite of everything, it actually was a pretty good day…it's all in the way you look at it.
Smiling at you all and myself too. Good night, Bright Wings

@secretwhitepop

Thanks GrandmaR. Sounds like you had wonderful parents. Lots of love.

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Thank you!
If you asked me when I was a teen, I would have laughed in your face.
My parents had their faults, just like we all do, but one thing was for sure, my parents ADORED each other and they loved me and my brother!

@brightwings

I am back from my ceremony…so much healing..I have 4 more children of my heart. I am so grateful. And so happy.
.
When I am having a hard day, I learned to recognize a moment of happiness and I put it in my pocket. Then the same with the next good moment, into my pocket it goes…
At the end of the day, I pull out those good moments, tiny as they might be and realize, in spite of everything, it actually was a pretty good day…it's all in the way you look at it.
Smiling at you all and myself too. Good night, Bright Wings

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Glad you had a wonderful day.
You are right, is the glass half full or half empty?
I once saw something on a show, can't remember which one, but the concept was simple and quite telling….
For one day, write down all the good things that happened.
At the end of the day, you have a physical representation of how your day was.
On the converse side, for one day you write all the bad things that happened.
At the end of the day, you take those bad things and throw them in the trash.
Through your bad things away.
I though it was interesting………..
Ronnie (GRANDMAr}

Brightwings has mentioned that she uses CBD oil primarily to successfully mitigate anxiety, MS symptoms and pain. My first Effexor withdrawal symptoms were anxiety, agitation and insomnia. I bought some hemp-derived CBD oil (legal in all 50 states) when my WD symptoms began, but I found the right mix of supplements at the same time, so didn't really use it. I don't know much about CBD oil, but Brightwing's recent postings made me look into it again. I saw some sellers had "full spectrum" and "isolates" and I wondered what they were talking about (and these particular sellers didn't say). I am not advocating use (only ever used one dropperful, so didn't try it long enough to have any personal experience that CBD oil is effective for the WD symptoms I was having) and I have no affiliation with any seller, but thought some of you might want to know more about CBD oil, the differences in available types, which ones may help different conditions and some reputable sellers–https://www.marijuanabreak.com/full-spectrum-cbd-oil.

@grandmar

Glad you had a wonderful day.
You are right, is the glass half full or half empty?
I once saw something on a show, can't remember which one, but the concept was simple and quite telling….
For one day, write down all the good things that happened.
At the end of the day, you have a physical representation of how your day was.
On the converse side, for one day you write all the bad things that happened.
At the end of the day, you take those bad things and throw them in the trash.
Through your bad things away.
I though it was interesting………..
Ronnie (GRANDMAr}

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Day 11 of Effexor discontinuation (75mg 2.5 yr), my cognitive ability, memory, smell, photosensitivity, shaking, tingling, appetite and monotonic jerks are “intermittently” improving. A perplexing mysterious rash on my chest, in which stopped and stumped doctors for years, dissipated within 24 hours of discontinuation. Day 5 discontinuation symptoms increased considerably. In an effort to combat discomfort and lack of serotonin reuptake inhibitor utilized Ultram, Vistarel, Muscle relaxers, Art therapy, CBD/THC Vapor, exercise and massage. Encouraging others to discontinue safety. For me, being a highly functioning Autistic individual, Effexor stole my intelligence. The makers of Effexor need to discontinue…..

@secretwhitepop

Hi there! Mostly I cry when I first see her because when she is sad it breaks my heart. Also, I haven’t been the happiest or strongest person this past year after my fathers passing. I think I’m still in denial. Frozen in time. And mom misses the love of her life too. So, it’s hard to stay upbeat. And I want her to be more cared for so that when I visit we can just goof around. And I won’t worry that there’s pee in her 🙂

Yes, I agree about hygiene. She is sporting a broken tooth! My brother is doing a great job in caring for her everyday, but we are all so so busy.

Get this, though, I am now at my mother in laws house and am at peace. I called mom to check in and she is listening to the Pope. All is well. I am at peace.

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@secretwhitepop– I can understand how sad you feel because it is sad. What can you do to make sure that she is more cared for?

@grandmar

Glad you had a wonderful day.
You are right, is the glass half full or half empty?
I once saw something on a show, can't remember which one, but the concept was simple and quite telling….
For one day, write down all the good things that happened.
At the end of the day, you have a physical representation of how your day was.
On the converse side, for one day you write all the bad things that happened.
At the end of the day, you take those bad things and throw them in the trash.
Through your bad things away.
I though it was interesting………..
Ronnie (GRANDMAr}

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At the end of my healing, I had so many drawings and watercolors about different instances of abuse…
That art work helped me heal…however, I realized at some point I was still holding on to the abuse by keeping them.
So one Ceremony, I took the really bad ones, like specifically so many eyes watching all over in this one watercolor.
I brought them to Ceremony and burned them in Sacred Fire, thus purifying those memories and sending all that abuse to God to KEEP cuz I needed and wanted to let go of it all.
Bright Wings

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