Therapy received from a social worker

Posted by lsittll @lsittll, Jul 21, 2021

I research all my doctors and behavioral therapists before seeing the ones listed that participate in my HMO. When I research social workers I found one that I saw something about having criminal history. What? I thought. Either it was some phony thing there, like you find many places, or it was true. Then I researched it further and saw that a person with a criminal history CAN become a LCSW. It seems so absurd. Who would want to see a LCSW with a criminal history? Surely not I! I'd like to know some other's opinions/feelings about an LCSW being allowed to have a criminal history.

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@Isittll It certainly can be a surprise to find out something like this in a potential member of your health team! A criminal history can be defined as many things, even traffic tickets can be part of that. Unless you know for certain what level of crimes makes up this person's history, my thought is to give them the benefit of the doubt. You could inquire at your first meeting, what is involved. If you are very uncomfortable with even a first meeting, check with your HMO about your co-pay if you go out of network.

All states have a regulating body that oversees people that are licensed as an LCSW. You might want to check with that organization in your state regarding their qualifications.

Will you let me know what you decide to do?
Ginger

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Ginger is correct. In the state of GA, a court official once told me that all traffic violations are a criminal offense. If you have concern, request a disposition of the case and circumstances regarding the incident. Ask if bail was involved and the amount. The higher the bond, the more serious the offense. Finally, DOL allows for criminal prosecutions to not be considered for employment, if the conviction is not job related. For example, a fraud conviction means you are not likely to receive employemt in a bank. However, a criminal drug conviction does not mean a counselor or social worker (depending on level of credentials) will be refused employment, if they can demonstrate sobriety for what ever time period is usual and cutomary to qualify as a counselor or therapist. Investigate your LCSW's credentials. Some states allow billing from licenses or credentials not in use (such as a retired medical practitioner), so you could have a peer counselor who has not passed any board exam for competency, especially under a HMO health plan.

Having a LCSW usually is safe to trust as a therapist, if they have earned credentials and passed a board exam. Like LPC's (Licensed Professional Counselors) they have to have a 60-72 credit hour graduate degree from an accredited academic institution and a national or state board exam. Also, if you can find a LCSW/BSN, is even better. Best regards.

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@gingerw

@Isittll It certainly can be a surprise to find out something like this in a potential member of your health team! A criminal history can be defined as many things, even traffic tickets can be part of that. Unless you know for certain what level of crimes makes up this person's history, my thought is to give them the benefit of the doubt. You could inquire at your first meeting, what is involved. If you are very uncomfortable with even a first meeting, check with your HMO about your co-pay if you go out of network.

All states have a regulating body that oversees people that are licensed as an LCSW. You might want to check with that organization in your state regarding their qualifications.

Will you let me know what you decide to do?
Ginger

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I do not feel comfortable asking her about her criminal history. No way! I'm not so sure I like her. The one I really want to see never got back to me. I narrowed it down and this is the counselor I will see her one more time and if I don't like her then I'll go elsewhere.

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