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JohnWBurns
@johnwburns

Posts: 300
Joined: Jun 02, 2015

Thyroid disease's impact on other conditions

Posted by @johnwburns, Aug 20, 2016

I try to start topics where a condition may have an unexpected link to something else, or at least be evaluated should certain symptoms appear. I thought about this because a) I have a history of thyroid disease (Grave’s, thyroid ablated and replacement) b) I’m dealing with another issue, rather sudden onset bradycardia, and subclinical hypothyroidism is one of the short list of possible causes.

Thyroid is implicated in so many things due to its central role in metabolism that if dysfunction is suspected in the context of another condition, you should probably ask your doctor for a thyroid panel, TSH, Free T4 minimally.

There is a long history of controversy on what numbers reflect a treatable condition. A good clinician will weigh symptoms versus numbers accordingly.

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/122393-treatment#d9

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740939/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712377/

It appears that if it is a contributing factor to the condition in question, lets use sinus bradycardia, there is a lot of potential gain to be had from a small investment in treatment.

Jim

REPLY

Thanks for these articles Jim. The controversy about values and treating thyroid conditions is confusing at best. Treatment guidelines are constantly changing and differ from country to country.

Liked by JohnWBurns

Very true but there is a baseline within which perceptive doctors can wiggle according to symptoms presented. On the other end their are shrill sites that exploit thyroid problems as the source of all the world’s ills.
You may find this interesting. Ashkenazi Jews are known for longevity and part of the reason may be a heritable trend toward low thyroid, as in higher TSH with normal T4 & T3. The study below supports the lower thyroid-longer life association.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739380/

@johnwburns

Very true but there is a baseline within which perceptive doctors can wiggle according to symptoms presented. On the other end their are shrill sites that exploit thyroid problems as the source of all the world’s ills.
You may find this interesting. Ashkenazi Jews are known for longevity and part of the reason may be a heritable trend toward low thyroid, as in higher TSH with normal T4 & T3. The study below supports the lower thyroid-longer life association.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739380/

Jump to this post

About to take a battery of tests as my calcium is high and my vit D is very low. B 12 has been low for months and I take shots.
I know this can be serious, do you have any ideas for me?

@johnwburns

Very true but there is a baseline within which perceptive doctors can wiggle according to symptoms presented. On the other end their are shrill sites that exploit thyroid problems as the source of all the world’s ills.
You may find this interesting. Ashkenazi Jews are known for longevity and part of the reason may be a heritable trend toward low thyroid, as in higher TSH with normal T4 & T3. The study below supports the lower thyroid-longer life association.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739380/

Jump to this post

Do you know what they are looking for with these tests, Nancy?

Cancer

@nancywhite

Oh, yes that must be worrisome. Waiting is really hard. When will you have the tests done?

Nov 7

@johnwburns

Very true but there is a baseline within which perceptive doctors can wiggle according to symptoms presented. On the other end their are shrill sites that exploit thyroid problems as the source of all the world’s ills.
You may find this interesting. Ashkenazi Jews are known for longevity and part of the reason may be a heritable trend toward low thyroid, as in higher TSH with normal T4 & T3. The study below supports the lower thyroid-longer life association.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739380/

Jump to this post

What about hyperparathyroidism?

Nancy Shermoen~

@johnwburns

Very true but there is a baseline within which perceptive doctors can wiggle according to symptoms presented. On the other end their are shrill sites that exploit thyroid problems as the source of all the world’s ills.
You may find this interesting. Ashkenazi Jews are known for longevity and part of the reason may be a heritable trend toward low thyroid, as in higher TSH with normal T4 & T3. The study below supports the lower thyroid-longer life association.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739380/

Jump to this post

Hello Nancy. I am responding to your posted question because I am in the middle of those tests which you will likely receive. There are hormonal issues which can have great impact on your body, and not be cancer. There are also benign cancers which can have these effects. My daughter had a benign macro pituitary adenoma removed successfully, and she is healthy and fully living with no medications. There are adrenal gland issues and pituitary issues which are also benign. Most can be treated with medications and life style adjustments. I hope these points are reassuring, which is what I am holding onto. I am trying to stay relaxed as possible, pace myself ( because I tend to take on a lot and beat myself up when I get tired), and eat lots and lots of vegetables for my immune system. I am trying to embrace each sensory experience, each hug, and each text from my kids and friends. Stay connected, and allow yourself to vent. Best of luck, and my prayers.

@nancywhite

Hello Colleen. I have a question for you and Jim. First I will comment on the bradycardia because it has been an increasing issue with me. I have been treated for hypothyroid for over 30 years. My low heart rate has gotten lower, especially when I sleep (45 to 50 bpm), making getting out of bed in the morning a process. TSH is normal with the synthroid supplement. I take a supplement to successfully increase my B-12 levels as they were barely within normal, but my extreme fatigue is a major problem still. My testing has produced low cortisol levels. Imaging has shown no thoracic or pelvic tumors. My family history is positive for 3 generations of pituitary adenoma, and adrenal failure NOS and resulting in death. The deaths occurred before diagnosis/treatment options existed. Do you know of websites with good information on secondary adrenal dysfunction? I have researched quite a bit already, including some of the excellent Mayo sites. There must be research happening which I have not been able to access yet, especially including the familial connection. I think I have already had 2 big cortisol crashes following surgeries, but I was in lucky locations each time. I am undiagnosed at this point, but it is in process. I have 4 daughters, two of whom have significant disruptions (including a cystic like tumor removed on one.) I want o get information for them, and I want to see my future grand kids. Any validated studies will be appreciated. Thanks!

@nancywhite

Great questions Upartist, which are out of my scope of knowledge. But I’m tagging @johnwburns, @jmbjar and @predictable to see if they can help sleuth validated studies with you.

@nancywhite

Thank you so much Colleen! I appreciate it. Information (real information) helps me understand the process, so I can fend off the dominoes.

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