Stop smoking panic attacks.

Posted by littleonefmohio @littleonefmohio, Mar 28, 2018

I am hoping someone can help me with this. I have been trying to stop smoking again. I thought I was doing good, like I always do. I was wearing the smoking patch and have been on them for over 2 weeks. Yesterday I had a panic attack. This seems to happen every time I try and quit smoking which takes me right back to smoking. I thought for sure I would make it this time. Does anyone have any suggestion as to what to use to help me with these panic attacks while trying to quit? I was on Wellbutrin before and it help me to quit but a month hit of being on it and I started getting very mean and bad thoughts so had to get off of it. Any and all suggestions appreciated.

@merpreb

Hello All- My name is Merry and I am a Mentor for Connect, mostly lung cancer. I quit smoking after 35 years because I was diagnosed with lung cancer for the first time in 1997 and have had 3 more lung cancers up until my last one in 2017.
After I was told that I had lung cancer my first thought was, sh…, I'll have to stop smoking, OMG how am I going to do that? And for one month, up until I quit 1 week before my surgery I had only panic about quitting. With all the tests that I had to endure pre-lobectomy all I did was smoke and panic about not smoking and if I would be able to stop smoking.
I was not practicing any religion, nevertheless I called my Rabbi up and he referred me to his wife Julie. I wanted to know how to pray again and I wanted to know how I could stop smoking. First Julie told me not to worry about how to pray, that I had more serious issue to deal with. Then she said a prayer could be any word, Sun, flower, etc. That there was not one way to pray for anyone. So I started to say Sun every morning and began thinking about all of the rest of her words and finally I went out and bought patches. One night, a week before surgery I woke up smoked what I hope was my last cigarette and put a patch on. That was the last time I smoked and that was 22 years ago.
I am wondering if any of you have been successful in quitting smoking and what have been your largest struggles @littleonefmohio, @pranas, @marylou705, @bluelagoon

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@merpreb I quit smoking after many tries to quit. I can't remember them all, but once there w as man who came to town once or twice every month and would hypnotize a group of people for either weight loss, or stopping smoking. I went to both and the quit smoking group was really helpful. I stopped fro a good four months. that was a record for me. Of course we all flocked around after an bought up all his tapes. It helped. Some sort of stressful situation came up–really tough–I think my daughter had once of her five scoliosis surgeries and I though I'd smoke just to get me through the ordeal. Like any addition, I just smoked more from then on. I tried flat out cold turkey after that and didn't last long. There were other attempts and then I just thought the heck with it. Was back in graduate school getting a masters in counseling psychology and it was toward the end of the course and we were having the written exams for all the years of study. I developed. With my heavy smoking I was an easy mark for bronchitis, strep throat, and other such things. So, for the first time during these exams I developed severe pleurisy. Went to the exams still smoking and when they were over was about to light up. I recall the pack was almost empty and I put the cigarette back in and threw the whole thing out. That was my last cigarette. i of course used Nicorette which helped with the nicotine withdrawal. It was tough, but I haven't smoked since 1995.I think what helped was visualizing who much better I felt NOT smoking–things tasted better, smell returned, and I had much better lung function. There were a number of attempts, but those are the main ones I recall. As a smoker I had a heavy cough especially int he morning and evening and it took a bunch of tries to get my throat cleared before sleep an upon waking up–a heavy smoker's cough–it was gross and bothersome. Then as all you know this year i was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma in my right lung. Wasn't even being tested for that, but fortunately a CT scan for heart was read by the radiologist who discovered a suspicious suspicious small spot on that right lung. Had a biopsy and it was a very small spot. Had a lobectomy in March 2019 and mercifully there was no spread to the lymph nodes, or any areas related. In September I go for a follow up CT scan. The CT scan looms if I think about it, but try and focus on other things. Sometimes that is easy adn sometimes not. I love what your Rabbi's wife said–prayer is anything we say. I think it is the meaning behind what we say. I certainly during all this have become more spiritual. We all need something greater than ourselves upon which to rely in difficult times. Now I try and be grateful for just about anything–not easy, but everyday i give thanks just for having waked up to another day and anything else that comes to mind. So there is my giving up smoking story. I inhaled deeply, had a severe smoker's cough, etc. I though it was cool when i started at 18. Now, if I am around smokers I do not like the smell. Funny I don't remember the smell of cigarette smoke being a bother while smoking. Now it is most unpleasant and has been for a good number of years. It is a tough habit to break and Nicotine is supposed to be more difficult to give up than heroine is. Anyway, I am glad to be a non-smoker and can't see every returning to the thing. I believe the basic change agent is something that wakes us up to the damage that cigarettes do us. For me it was smoking during pleurisy and I certainly can see how a lung cancer diagnosis would really be reason to stop as you did. Loved reading your story and thank you fro sharing ti with us.

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@alamogal635

@merpreb I quit smoking after many tries to quit. I can't remember them all, but once there w as man who came to town once or twice every month and would hypnotize a group of people for either weight loss, or stopping smoking. I went to both and the quit smoking group was really helpful. I stopped fro a good four months. that was a record for me. Of course we all flocked around after an bought up all his tapes. It helped. Some sort of stressful situation came up–really tough–I think my daughter had once of her five scoliosis surgeries and I though I'd smoke just to get me through the ordeal. Like any addition, I just smoked more from then on. I tried flat out cold turkey after that and didn't last long. There were other attempts and then I just thought the heck with it. Was back in graduate school getting a masters in counseling psychology and it was toward the end of the course and we were having the written exams for all the years of study. I developed. With my heavy smoking I was an easy mark for bronchitis, strep throat, and other such things. So, for the first time during these exams I developed severe pleurisy. Went to the exams still smoking and when they were over was about to light up. I recall the pack was almost empty and I put the cigarette back in and threw the whole thing out. That was my last cigarette. i of course used Nicorette which helped with the nicotine withdrawal. It was tough, but I haven't smoked since 1995.I think what helped was visualizing who much better I felt NOT smoking–things tasted better, smell returned, and I had much better lung function. There were a number of attempts, but those are the main ones I recall. As a smoker I had a heavy cough especially int he morning and evening and it took a bunch of tries to get my throat cleared before sleep an upon waking up–a heavy smoker's cough–it was gross and bothersome. Then as all you know this year i was diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma in my right lung. Wasn't even being tested for that, but fortunately a CT scan for heart was read by the radiologist who discovered a suspicious suspicious small spot on that right lung. Had a biopsy and it was a very small spot. Had a lobectomy in March 2019 and mercifully there was no spread to the lymph nodes, or any areas related. In September I go for a follow up CT scan. The CT scan looms if I think about it, but try and focus on other things. Sometimes that is easy adn sometimes not. I love what your Rabbi's wife said–prayer is anything we say. I think it is the meaning behind what we say. I certainly during all this have become more spiritual. We all need something greater than ourselves upon which to rely in difficult times. Now I try and be grateful for just about anything–not easy, but everyday i give thanks just for having waked up to another day and anything else that comes to mind. So there is my giving up smoking story. I inhaled deeply, had a severe smoker's cough, etc. I though it was cool when i started at 18. Now, if I am around smokers I do not like the smell. Funny I don't remember the smell of cigarette smoke being a bother while smoking. Now it is most unpleasant and has been for a good number of years. It is a tough habit to break and Nicotine is supposed to be more difficult to give up than heroine is. Anyway, I am glad to be a non-smoker and can't see every returning to the thing. I believe the basic change agent is something that wakes us up to the damage that cigarettes do us. For me it was smoking during pleurisy and I certainly can see how a lung cancer diagnosis would really be reason to stop as you did. Loved reading your story and thank you fro sharing ti with us.

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@alamogal635– Hey- Thanks for pinch hitting for me when you had the time! That was certainly a hard trip for you. I'm so glad that you quit and I'm sure that you can smell and taste everything better. Thank you for sharing your story. I'll never plan to go back- but I still dream sometimes that someone catches me with cigarettes or smell smoke on me 🙁

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Several of you have shared a bit about experiencing panic attacks while trying to stop smoking and what might help with that. Wanted to check in with some of you and see how things are going. I know that what you share will be beneficial for many in this discussion.

@littleonefmohio – how are things going with the stop-smoking process?

@alamogal635 – how are things going for you? Have you experienced any strong urges to start up smoking again?

@pranas – how has it gone for you? You mentioned good things coming out of stopping smoking for you. Will you share more about what those are?

@travelgirl and @gman007 – any other suggestions on the path to quitting smoking and managing panic and anxiety with that process?

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@merpreb @alamogal635 @lisalucier Ladies- Sorry for being slow to respond. Been up to my eyeballs in stuff here. So much of Alamo gal rang true with me- waking up with the gross cough. knowing I should quit. I ended up using Chantix but what I really think did it was reading Easy Way to Stop Smoking by Allen Carr. He did a good job of illustrating to me how we've been hypnotized TO smoke and this is really reclaiming out lives. In my case I only quit in 2016 and then in 2018 was diagnosed from a routine ct scan and had a lobectomy. Unfortunately, mine did hit one lymph node, so there were 4 follow-up chemo treatments. Fortunately, I had minimal side effects. Most times I don't think about smoking. Unfortunately, when someone smokes I do still like the smell. Humorously, I find when a place is full of smoke (like a garage where the owner sneaks out for smokes) I think it STINKS- didn't even recognize it until it happened somewhere else! My secret weapon when I get smacked on the back of the head with an urge is a wintergreen lifesaver. Works every time- although when very bad I need 2!

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@bluelagoon– Good afternoon. It's so good to hear from you again. Urges still crop up on me occasionally even after 22 years, but that's only if I am very stressed. I ride it out but sucking a mint would work too. I'm glad that you stuck it out.
I can't be in the room with smoke because I have had enough smoking and that's what caused my cancer. I don't want to smell like it or breathe it in or taste it.
How has your health been since your chemo? How often do you get follow-up CT scans?

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@merpreb Merry- I'm on quarterly visits to Mayo since I'm in my first 2 years. I actually feel better than ever, other than losing my drive to get up as early as I did. But, I have gotten back to where I was with exercise since my PA there said cardio would be great for me going forward. So, likely may have found out I'm more of a late day person!

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@bluelagoon– lol, I was too after my all of my cancers. I'm so happy that you are feeling well. What a relief, eh?

Liked by bluelagoon

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@bluelagoon

@merpreb @alamogal635 @lisalucier Ladies- Sorry for being slow to respond. Been up to my eyeballs in stuff here. So much of Alamo gal rang true with me- waking up with the gross cough. knowing I should quit. I ended up using Chantix but what I really think did it was reading Easy Way to Stop Smoking by Allen Carr. He did a good job of illustrating to me how we've been hypnotized TO smoke and this is really reclaiming out lives. In my case I only quit in 2016 and then in 2018 was diagnosed from a routine ct scan and had a lobectomy. Unfortunately, mine did hit one lymph node, so there were 4 follow-up chemo treatments. Fortunately, I had minimal side effects. Most times I don't think about smoking. Unfortunately, when someone smokes I do still like the smell. Humorously, I find when a place is full of smoke (like a garage where the owner sneaks out for smokes) I think it STINKS- didn't even recognize it until it happened somewhere else! My secret weapon when I get smacked on the back of the head with an urge is a wintergreen lifesaver. Works every time- although when very bad I need 2!

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@bluelagoon – will you share more about your secret weapon Wintergreen mints for when you have an urge to smoke? Do you think they are a distraction, keep your mouth occupied, something else?

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..what I did, I eat carrots. I prepared them the day before and put them in the refrigerator…so they were ready if I felt the urge for a cigarette I took a carrot instead. Needless to mention, I avoided all things I used to do when smoking…no alcohol, no coffee for one year! Never ever again a cigarette and I used to smoke for 10 years.

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@lisalucier

@bluelagoon – will you share more about your secret weapon Wintergreen mints for when you have an urge to smoke? Do you think they are a distraction, keep your mouth occupied, something else?

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@lisalucier Not sure I can explain but the Wintergreen other than they just hit my "it" zone. I recall a friend years ago being told to suck on Cinnamon sticks. On a failed attempt I used those and they did nothing for me. Something about these just comforts my addiction zone, I think.

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I quit cold turkey but not sure might be the cause of my anxiety or panic attacks

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Hello All:

On the WebMD daily email, there was a slideshow about how your body begins to heal when you stop smoking. The information provided in this presentation is really remarkable and I thought that you might find it interesting.

Here is the link, https://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/ss/slideshow-effects-of-quitting-smoking?

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@hopeful33250– Good morning. May I butt in? As a former smoker for 35 years (an a current lung cancer patient) I was intrigued by this article. And I found 2 more to help. One thing that both addresses is the need to make a plan to cope with with drawl symptoms. According to WebMD nicotine and other lethal ingredients in cigarettes leave your body within about 3 days. That sounds astonishing to me.
So why do the cravings last as long as they do, sometimes coming back years later? Because it's your brain that is remembering, not your body so you have to re-train your mind. Here is some help.
https://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/qa/how-long-does-nicotine-stay-in-your-system
https://www.verywellmind.com/craving-cigarettes-3-months-after-quitting-what-to-do-2824897

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In going through that rite now I've been stopped for a 1 1/2 month and Man

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@trellg132

In going through that rite now I've been stopped for a 1 1/2 month and Man

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@trellg132– Good morning and good for you! Oh boy do I know what this Man means. It is so tough. After my surgery which was 1 week after I quit I went home post op and couldn't exercise for a while to help with cravings. They certainly pull your strings, and test you beyond endurance sometimes. There are no rhythm or rhythm to the cravings. Smelling smoke never set me off. I was surprised that drinking coffee didn't either.
What are you doing to off set the cravings? Did you have a plan before hand or set a quit date?

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