Severe leg cramps

Posted by Dawn, Volunteer Mentor @dawn_giacabazi, Jun 25, 2016

Please someone tell me the trick to relax severe leg cramps???? Lord, they are lasting 1-2 hours, debilitating pain. Can’t walk them off. Starting behind the knees down to my toes. Some curl my toes some point them. Tried stretching, bio feedback relaxation. NO HELP!! HELP!

@predictable

@coastalgirl, I’m interested in kidney disease as a cause of your cramps. I have both, but haven’t discussed cramps with my nephrologist. How do you think I could raise that issue with her most effectively? There are so many facets of kidney disease that finding how it produces cramps is like looking for planets among the stars! Can you help me zero in on this?

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I love my mayo docs!! Totally different way of treating patients.

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Okay some good news to share, tonic water & mustard works great!! Also I worked with my physical therapist and he showed me that there is an antagonist and antiantagonist muscle group for your body and when you’re having a muscle cramp you need to massage deeply the opposite muscle group for which your having muscle cramps of course the first thing I did was massage the antagonist cramp. Now with my leg cramps last night I did the tonic water, mustard, and rubbed the antiantagonist muscle group IT WORKED!! 🙂 So for me definitely mustard, tonic water, and massage!! Woo hoo Thank you all for all your help!!!

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@dawn_giacabazi

Okay some good news to share, tonic water & mustard works great!! Also I worked with my physical therapist and he showed me that there is an antagonist and antiantagonist muscle group for your body and when you’re having a muscle cramp you need to massage deeply the opposite muscle group for which your having muscle cramps of course the first thing I did was massage the antagonist cramp. Now with my leg cramps last night I did the tonic water, mustard, and rubbed the antiantagonist muscle group IT WORKED!! 🙂 So for me definitely mustard, tonic water, and massage!! Woo hoo Thank you all for all your help!!!

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Hi @dawn_giacabazi. That’s awesome news. So glad to hear it worked 🙂 It’s amazing the little tricks people have! Hope you have a great (cramp free) holiday weekend!

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@dawn_giacabazi

Okay some good news to share, tonic water & mustard works great!! Also I worked with my physical therapist and he showed me that there is an antagonist and antiantagonist muscle group for your body and when you’re having a muscle cramp you need to massage deeply the opposite muscle group for which your having muscle cramps of course the first thing I did was massage the antagonist cramp. Now with my leg cramps last night I did the tonic water, mustard, and rubbed the antiantagonist muscle group IT WORKED!! 🙂 So for me definitely mustard, tonic water, and massage!! Woo hoo Thank you all for all your help!!!

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Awesome! Thank you for updating us on your success. This is what makes a network like this worthwhile!!

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The reason I suggested askin your doctor about cyclobenzaprine was that (as I’ve experienced) mine was not do to dehydration, which I was told could be a factor involved.
Additionally, with my cancer having mestasized to liver and other area’s, muscle wasting is apparent. With that dietary factors and fluid intake can play a role in muscular involvement. In other words if you deplete fluid from your system as fast as you take it in; it doesn’t have the ability to do its job.

irvkay312

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Greatly appreciate the info. I asked my doctor the other day and waiting for him to let me know. I am hopeful it will prevent me from having them. Will let you know as soon as I get the chance to give it a try. 🙂

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@irvkay312

Ask your doctor for a 10 mg. prescription dosage of Cyclobenzaprine.

I had severe cramps at night and that took them away.

irvvay312

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The reasoning in having the doctor prescribe is likely to view your CBC and any liklihood that the cause is not any type of dehydration in your system. On google type severe cramps at night vs causes—see what answers arise.

irvkay312

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@irvkay312

The reason I suggested askin your doctor about cyclobenzaprine was that (as I’ve experienced) mine was not do to dehydration, which I was told could be a factor involved.
Additionally, with my cancer having mestasized to liver and other area’s, muscle wasting is apparent. With that dietary factors and fluid intake can play a role in muscular involvement. In other words if you deplete fluid from your system as fast as you take it in; it doesn’t have the ability to do its job.

irvkay312

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@irvkay312 I thank you for all your help. I agree with you. Your knowledge is gold!!

I have a tumor in my adrenal gland which depletes my sodium and potassium. I would have bet a million dollars that was why I have so many horrible cramps. I went to the ER after I passed out, very weak, could hardle hold my head up, positive they would give me fluids increase my potassium & I’d be good again. However all levels normal. They can not figure out why. I see a specialist next week.

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@irvkay312

The reason I suggested askin your doctor about cyclobenzaprine was that (as I’ve experienced) mine was not do to dehydration, which I was told could be a factor involved.
Additionally, with my cancer having mestasized to liver and other area’s, muscle wasting is apparent. With that dietary factors and fluid intake can play a role in muscular involvement. In other words if you deplete fluid from your system as fast as you take it in; it doesn’t have the ability to do its job.

irvkay312

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@dawn_giacabazi, perhaps my experience can be helpful to you. For treatment of my hypertension, I was referred to a nephrologist who works with unimaginable attention to detail and basic causes. She puzzled, as you have, about normal lab results yet episodes of potassium deficiency causing cramps and occasional fainting during heavy exercise. She enlisted the help of an endocrinologist to examine relevant hormones. Together, they figured out a lot of things.

A growth on my kidney was suspected of being a pheochromocytoma that manufactures excess adrenal hormones, but that couldn’t be confirmed, partly because the growth wasn’t located in my adrenal gland. Also, my problem was not excess adrenalin components, but appeared to be hyperaldosteronism, although the endocrinologist couldn’t confirm that. The ultimate diagnosis was Liddle Syndrome, a genetic mutation of the kidney that fails to reclaim potassium being sloughed off with sodium during cleaning of my blood. A potassium-sparing diuretic (Amiloride) has alleviated my problems but has not resolved them completely. I found some basic information on pheochromocytoma at this address: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pheochromocytoma/basics/causes/con-20030435. This suggests what I obtained from the ranks of specialists — a nephrologist working with an endocrinologist looking for a root cause (brainlesslessly called “secondary cause”).

I hope you find something of relevance in my experience. I know from following you that you are relentless in searching for answers — not only for yourself, but for all of us gathered here on the Mayo Connect to share information and experiences. Best wishes for success with your specialist next week.
Martin

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@irvkay312

The reason I suggested askin your doctor about cyclobenzaprine was that (as I’ve experienced) mine was not do to dehydration, which I was told could be a factor involved.
Additionally, with my cancer having mestasized to liver and other area’s, muscle wasting is apparent. With that dietary factors and fluid intake can play a role in muscular involvement. In other words if you deplete fluid from your system as fast as you take it in; it doesn’t have the ability to do its job.

irvkay312

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@predictable A man after my own heart!! My diagnosis is secondary hyperaldosteronism. My levels of both Aldosterone & Renin are very high. My nephrologist started me on Aldactone in Sept and I finally hit therapeutic levels last month. Apparently I am a very slow metabolizer of aldactone. (Genetic testing).. Normally Aldactone drives up potassium but for some reason they are trying to figure out it does not in me. I currently take hydralazine, labetalol, nifedipine, chlorthalidone, & spironolactone to keep my blood pressures down. I was admited to St. Mary’s Rochester Mayo’s in Sept with blood pressures 300/208. Much better today but still break through’s of 200/140’s .

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@irvkay312

The reason I suggested askin your doctor about cyclobenzaprine was that (as I’ve experienced) mine was not do to dehydration, which I was told could be a factor involved.
Additionally, with my cancer having mestasized to liver and other area’s, muscle wasting is apparent. With that dietary factors and fluid intake can play a role in muscular involvement. In other words if you deplete fluid from your system as fast as you take it in; it doesn’t have the ability to do its job.

irvkay312

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So sorry to hear of your issues. Hope you find answers and solutions soon! God’s speed!

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@irvkay312

The reason I suggested askin your doctor about cyclobenzaprine was that (as I’ve experienced) mine was not do to dehydration, which I was told could be a factor involved.
Additionally, with my cancer having mestasized to liver and other area’s, muscle wasting is apparent. With that dietary factors and fluid intake can play a role in muscular involvement. In other words if you deplete fluid from your system as fast as you take it in; it doesn’t have the ability to do its job.

irvkay312

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@dawn_giacabazi, we are indeed on similar paths, but different in two important respects: Your hypertension is more challenging than mine for sure (with 3 meds, I average around 148/90 right now — never over 160 systolic or above 106 diastolic), and I wish I could show you how to come down to my level. In my case, my likely secondary cause is known — the Liddle Syndrome genetic mutation. My potassium deficiency was assumed for a long time to have been connected to a sodium problem, which turned out to be a dead end alley (Lasix almost sent me away for good). I also have been through Aldactone (spironolactone), Trandate (labetalol), calcium channel blockers (at least three like nifedipine), diuretics (at least four like chlorthalidone), alpha blocker (Hytrin), brain isolation drug (Clonidine), vasodilators (Minoxidil), ARBs (like Losartan) — all part of earlier trials by primary physician, cardiologist, and two prior nephrologists (doing SOMETHING when we didn’t know what to do). All seemed necessary, despite moderately high BP, because of apparent hypertrophy of the walls of my left ventricle.

Today, my three medications — all focused on hypertension with hypokalemia — are Amiloride (potassium-sparing diuretic), Lisinopril (working against contraction of blood vessels and heart degeneration), and Carvedilol (a relatively new beta blocker that is more friendly with the kidneys than the Atenolol I was taking). Aldactone worked well, but had to be dropped because it could have triggered cancer through a separate genetic mutation I inherited from my father.

None of my doctors mentioned pharmacogenomics (PGx). My two genetic tests were not connected to medications in any way. But it’s time to bring PGx into the diagnosis process, and I’ll be pressing for that with my ingenious nephrologist (whom I’m visiting next week for the first time in three years).

All of the foregoing may not be of much help or comfort for you, but I’d do anything to smooth the way toward therapies that could bring your challenges under control. Is there anything you think I could do in this regard?
Martin

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@775031, I’m pleased to know of your interest in the details of my hypertension and resulting a-fib. Perhaps you identified with some of the unique experiences I have had and my nearly unique diagnosis. My main messages are: There is so much comfort we can have with more information, better information, and intensely caring medical therapists. Second, we have come together here on Mayo Connect to help each other discover how to find that comfort and to affirm our confidence that we can manage our symptoms and therapies to the best possible extent. If you have a troubling condition or questions of any kind, consider sharing them with us so we can provide some encouragement.
Martin

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My rheumatologist at Mayo Scottsdale, who I see regularly for my Wegeners & peripheral neuropathy, prescribed 0.125mg of Pramipexole (very small white tablet) twice a day when needed for leg cramps and my restless leg syndrome (RLS). I have used it for over a month and it has relieved the gripping leg/toe/foot cramps at night. When I have an over active day, I know I can expect cramps at night. So I take 2, about an hour before I retire with no cramps/RLS. I don’t take it for minor cramping which I seem to get anyway. My co-pay for the Rx is only $5/months supply which is cheaper than mustard, tonic water (yuk), & pickles (yum). I drink tons of water living in Arizona and I’m 65. I swim daily & take care of my own pool & have 2 grandsons 1 & 3 yrs old who live close. Keeps me going. I hope this offers another alternative to relieve your suffering.

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@bobsconnect I will definitely give that a try. Totally hate tonic water & mustard but hate the cramps more! :-(. I too love to swim but those are my worse days. I love to play softball with my daughter but that has trigered the recent episodes. No activity seems to be my best days. 🙁

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