Sadness over diagnosis

Posted by catmom777 @catmom777, Sat, Mar 30 6:04pm

I feel so sad about being diagnosed with afib. I also have some breathing issues (which might be causing my afib) and think I might have chronic bronchitis. I was also diagnosed with osteoporosis. None of these are a death sentence per se, but after a lifetime of being extremely healthy, I feel defeated. I did not see any of this coming except the breathing issues as I've had repeated bouts of bronchitis since I was a child. I'm having trouble coping. I first thought I might not live much longer (didn't know anything about afib) and started going through my stuff so my family wouldn't have to deal with a lot of junk if I died, then got a handle on that when I learned that afib sufferers can live a long time, but I still feel devastated.
Is anyone else out there dealing with this?

@becsbuddy

You sound so sad. I’m sorry. I’m an introvert, too, and quiet, just like you. Have you ever thought about finding a walking group thru the recreation center or the senior center? When I first moved here, I found a walking group and it was great! Also, use yourself to help others. Be a once a week visitor at a nursing home. Or maybe volunteer to be a dog walker at the humane society. Good luck and take care of yourself. Becky

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Thanks for that. I did better yesterday. I got six windows washed, vacuumed, and got some weeds pulled, and felt like I had a successful day. I also had more energy than usual. For the first six weeks after my big afib attack and diagnosis I just felt sick. I also thought then that having afib meant I wouldn't live very much longer. Maybe five or so years. But I've gradually been feeling better and have learned people can live fifteen more years with medication and a careful lifestyle. So, it's easier to actually live now. I don't feel miserable every day and have the energy to get things done. I do miss my girls and my grandchildren though, a lot, but will work on visiting them more and also look into volunteer work when I get back from my big trip this summer.

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@allegro

PLEASE DON'T LET SADNESS TAKE OVER YOUR LIFE….TAKE ONE DAY AT A TIME AND TRY TO ENJOY EVERY MINUTE OF IT…..THERE ARE THINGS SO MUCH WORSE THAN WHAT YOU HAVE.. I TOO HAVE AFIB, AM ON XERALTO DAILY, HAVE STENOSIS IN MY BACK, DEAL WITH ACHING LEGS AND OSTEOPOROSIS EVERY DAY AND AM TAKING CARE OF MY HUSBAND WHO HAS ALS. I AM 87 YRS OLD AND I THANK GOD I AM ALIVE. DON'T DWELL ON THE NEGATIVE, AND BE THANKFUL THAT YOU ARE STILL HERE . WE ALL HAVE SOMETHING TO DEAL WITH, SO TOUGHEN UP AND ENJOY YOUR TIME HERE ON EARTH EVEN THO YOU HAVE SOME BAD DAYS…………..ALLEGRO

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Thanks Allegro. God bless you.

Liked by lioness

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@catmom777 Hi… I just read your post and very sorry to hear your story. It can be devastating to have to deal with a new diagnosis but as you now know having hearing from so many, afib is a manageable disease and no matter what you hear can be treated successfully. I am wondering if you are seeing an electrophysiologist (EP)? Unless you have an underlying heart condition that is causing your afib, it can be very difficult to figure out why it happens. No need to beat yourself up. There are many EPs who strongly believe that diet is a major factor so the fact that you have maintained a healthy diet is good news!
I have had rheumatic heart disease since I was 12 (my first surgery) but only knew in my 30s that it is a lifelong disease and that afib and multiple heart surgeries was in my future. I had my first afib episode about 10 years later and was put on warfarin shortly thereafter. My afib. got progressively worse – it was very difficult to deal with as I went from one drug to another. At that time (20+ years ago) ablations were fairly new and I was told that because of my underlying conditions I was not a candidate for an ablation. Thank goodness that changed! I have been seeing an EP – in addition to my regular cardiologist for my valve problems since I started having episodes.
I cannot stress enough the value of being under the care of a top-notch EP! I had my first ablation two years ago and my second about 6 months later. So far so good! I am so grateful to have made it so far without any awful drugs (amiodarone being the worst of all) ! In the meantime of course I have had major heart surgery (my 3rd), gall bladder removed and more recently have had to deal with a flareup of a lung infection caused by NTM disease (you can read all about it on another forum on Bronchiectasis and MAC disease!) I also have osteoporosis and am mulling over starting another new drug for it. I find that the only way I can deal with all this is to exercise as if my life depended on it so I hit the gym every morning at 6.30 for over an hour. I volunteer at a senior center once a week serving meals (sometimes to much younger patrons!) I go for walks with different groups. My husband (who eats very healthy) and I cook and bake a lot. We have no children but try to keep a fairly busy social calendar. I hope you start to feel better and not let your illness define your life (I know someone else said that but so true and worth repeating). I have to keep reminding myself sometimes. Yes, it is hard if you are an introvert but if you start taking small steps it all gets easier.
Hope this helps.
Mary

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@allegro

PLEASE DON'T LET SADNESS TAKE OVER YOUR LIFE….TAKE ONE DAY AT A TIME AND TRY TO ENJOY EVERY MINUTE OF IT…..THERE ARE THINGS SO MUCH WORSE THAN WHAT YOU HAVE.. I TOO HAVE AFIB, AM ON XERALTO DAILY, HAVE STENOSIS IN MY BACK, DEAL WITH ACHING LEGS AND OSTEOPOROSIS EVERY DAY AND AM TAKING CARE OF MY HUSBAND WHO HAS ALS. I AM 87 YRS OLD AND I THANK GOD I AM ALIVE. DON'T DWELL ON THE NEGATIVE, AND BE THANKFUL THAT YOU ARE STILL HERE . WE ALL HAVE SOMETHING TO DEAL WITH, SO TOUGHEN UP AND ENJOY YOUR TIME HERE ON EARTH EVEN THO YOU HAVE SOME BAD DAYS…………..ALLEGRO

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@allegro I was just going to email you here to see how your doing then found this post from you .You sound very strong I'm happy for you . You are so right there are people we can look at that are worse of then me I wish you health and happiness .I think your husband would be proud of you. I am in reading your post. 🤩

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@catmom777

Thanks for that. I did better yesterday. I got six windows washed, vacuumed, and got some weeds pulled, and felt like I had a successful day. I also had more energy than usual. For the first six weeks after my big afib attack and diagnosis I just felt sick. I also thought then that having afib meant I wouldn't live very much longer. Maybe five or so years. But I've gradually been feeling better and have learned people can live fifteen more years with medication and a careful lifestyle. So, it's easier to actually live now. I don't feel miserable every day and have the energy to get things done. I do miss my girls and my grandchildren though, a lot, but will work on visiting them more and also look into volunteer work when I get back from my big trip this summer.

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GOOD FOR YOU!! STAY POSITIVE AND KNOW THAT OTHERS ARE ALOT WORSE OFF…….GOD BLESS YOU, DEAR……..YOU WILL MAKE IT …..STAY HAPPY AND VISIT YOUR KIDS OFTEN……..ALLEGRO

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Thanks Sayaboleh. It's stories like yours and others that have given me so much hope that I can eventually have a normal and active life and live several more years in decent health (as in not an invalid or feeling so rotten I don't enjoy life at all). As I said earlier, I felt rotten for a month, maybe six weeks, and thought that this is no way to live–miserable all the time just because I don't feel well enough to do anything. But in the past couple weeks I've been feeling gradually better and my afib has subsided to where I only feel palpitations (and the resulting tiredness) sometimes only once a day. Sometimes I feel them on and off all day, with the weird feelings and tiredness that go along with them, but at least it's not as often as it was. It was a rough ride at first with the tachycardia, sleeplessness, feeling rotten. It's so much better now. Additionally, this is the first time I've ever really felt my mortality. I always took my good health for granted. As the docs said when I had my echocardiagram and stress test–my heart is perfect. My lungs are good. So now I'm waiting to hear if I have sleep apnea after taking that overnight test. I have struggled with bronchial issues from as far back as I remember (my dad was a smoker), so that may have brought this on too as I am somewhat asthmatic. But, as my cardiologist said, I may never know what started it. And no, there are only two EPs in my city. I haven't seen one yet. Still waiting on test results. I'm not ready for an ablation, and as long as my palpitations are few and far between, I am not sure I need one. I'm hoping to put off any more aggressive measures until they are necessary, especially if I'm going to live many more years. I know this is a progressive condition, so will explore that later as it will probably get worse.
You have been through so much. It is wonderful that you find so many things to make you happy and make your life worthwhile. I worked as a caregiver until last Christmas when I got bronchitis again bad. And then the afib happened. I will find my path as I feel more healthy and stronger.
Thanks again for the words of encouragement. You are a role model for me for sure.

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Hi Catmom, Sorry about your diagnosis but maybe a little pep talk might help? I was diagnosed with LGL a heart syndrome when I was only 32 years old and thought my world would come to an end, even though the doc told me that it would not interfere with anything I wanted to do, so fast forward 44 years and here I am. About 4 years ago I was diagnosed with COPD, asthma bronchiestatis (sp) as well as osteopenia and here I am writing to you, so PLEASE don't give yourself a death sentence over your diagnosis, just get the best medical help available and keep right on going. "Attitude effects Altitude." Just had my 76th birthday last week.

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@baz10

Hi Catmom, Sorry about your diagnosis but maybe a little pep talk might help? I was diagnosed with LGL a heart syndrome when I was only 32 years old and thought my world would come to an end, even though the doc told me that it would not interfere with anything I wanted to do, so fast forward 44 years and here I am. About 4 years ago I was diagnosed with COPD, asthma bronchiestatis (sp) as well as osteopenia and here I am writing to you, so PLEASE don't give yourself a death sentence over your diagnosis, just get the best medical help available and keep right on going. "Attitude effects Altitude." Just had my 76th birthday last week.

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Wow. So many inspiring stories. Happy birthday. I'm glad to see you have such a good attitude about your challenges and so glad you've met them head on. I hope to live to 80, maybe 85. That would be just about right. But yes, in the meantime I must make each day count.

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It was great to read these “pep talks” today! I think you’re talking directly to me and I sure need it!
Becky

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@baz10

Hi Catmom, Sorry about your diagnosis but maybe a little pep talk might help? I was diagnosed with LGL a heart syndrome when I was only 32 years old and thought my world would come to an end, even though the doc told me that it would not interfere with anything I wanted to do, so fast forward 44 years and here I am. About 4 years ago I was diagnosed with COPD, asthma bronchiestatis (sp) as well as osteopenia and here I am writing to you, so PLEASE don't give yourself a death sentence over your diagnosis, just get the best medical help available and keep right on going. "Attitude effects Altitude." Just had my 76th birthday last week.

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@baz10 I agree wholeheartedly, attitude is everything. If you get mired in your diagnosis you just make yourself more miserable. You need to compartmentalize it and live as full a life as possible without letting that being a constant cloud hanging over you. I know people who let some medical problems really ruin their lives. You just can't let yourself do that.
JK

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@contentandwell

@baz10 I agree wholeheartedly, attitude is everything. If you get mired in your diagnosis you just make yourself more miserable. You need to compartmentalize it and live as full a life as possible without letting that being a constant cloud hanging over you. I know people who let some medical problems really ruin their lives. You just can't let yourself do that.
JK

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@catmom I also agree with a good positive attitude you can feel so much better and go on to live your life Happy Birthday 🎂

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@catmom777

Thanks Sayaboleh. It's stories like yours and others that have given me so much hope that I can eventually have a normal and active life and live several more years in decent health (as in not an invalid or feeling so rotten I don't enjoy life at all). As I said earlier, I felt rotten for a month, maybe six weeks, and thought that this is no way to live–miserable all the time just because I don't feel well enough to do anything. But in the past couple weeks I've been feeling gradually better and my afib has subsided to where I only feel palpitations (and the resulting tiredness) sometimes only once a day. Sometimes I feel them on and off all day, with the weird feelings and tiredness that go along with them, but at least it's not as often as it was. It was a rough ride at first with the tachycardia, sleeplessness, feeling rotten. It's so much better now. Additionally, this is the first time I've ever really felt my mortality. I always took my good health for granted. As the docs said when I had my echocardiagram and stress test–my heart is perfect. My lungs are good. So now I'm waiting to hear if I have sleep apnea after taking that overnight test. I have struggled with bronchial issues from as far back as I remember (my dad was a smoker), so that may have brought this on too as I am somewhat asthmatic. But, as my cardiologist said, I may never know what started it. And no, there are only two EPs in my city. I haven't seen one yet. Still waiting on test results. I'm not ready for an ablation, and as long as my palpitations are few and far between, I am not sure I need one. I'm hoping to put off any more aggressive measures until they are necessary, especially if I'm going to live many more years. I know this is a progressive condition, so will explore that later as it will probably get worse.
You have been through so much. It is wonderful that you find so many things to make you happy and make your life worthwhile. I worked as a caregiver until last Christmas when I got bronchitis again bad. And then the afib happened. I will find my path as I feel more healthy and stronger.
Thanks again for the words of encouragement. You are a role model for me for sure.

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@catmom777 Good to hear that your afib symptoms are becoming more manageable or maybe you are slowly getting used to them! Yes, ablation was always considered to be a last resort — if and only if your symptoms become intolerable. Having said that, it is minimally invasive requiring an overnight stay at most – sometimes same day and beats open heart surgery any day. Just nice to know that it is there should one need it and for the most part it works. Stay well! Mary

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@becsbuddy

It was great to read these “pep talks” today! I think you’re talking directly to me and I sure need it!
Becky

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Hi, Becky @becsbuddy, I sent you a private message regarding spotlights and was not sure if you saw it. I was wondering if you know how to check your private messages?

John

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@johnbishop

Hi, Becky @becsbuddy, I sent you a private message regarding spotlights and was not sure if you saw it. I was wondering if you know how to check your private messages?

John

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No I don’t know how to get private messages!

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@catmom777

Thanks for that. I did better yesterday. I got six windows washed, vacuumed, and got some weeds pulled, and felt like I had a successful day. I also had more energy than usual. For the first six weeks after my big afib attack and diagnosis I just felt sick. I also thought then that having afib meant I wouldn't live very much longer. Maybe five or so years. But I've gradually been feeling better and have learned people can live fifteen more years with medication and a careful lifestyle. So, it's easier to actually live now. I don't feel miserable every day and have the energy to get things done. I do miss my girls and my grandchildren though, a lot, but will work on visiting them more and also look into volunteer work when I get back from my big trip this summer.

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I’m so glad you’re back to being active and you sound like a happy person! Gardening and window washing and vacuuming oh, my! All in 1 day! When I feel down, I try to follow the suggestions of the gratitude discussion group: before I go to sleep, I think of what I’m grateful for in my day, and when I wake up, I do the same. It has helped me to turn my attitude around. Best of luck and we hope to keep hearing from you. Becky

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