Recommendation for 0.2 micron filters

Posted by formergardener @formergardener, May 16 5:43pm

Hello to all in the group. There has been so, so much valuable information in this supportive resource, and I am so much more aware of the questions I need to be asking, so here is another one!

I believe that Sue mentioned in a post that she uses a 0.2 micron point-of-use filter. We had a whole house, 3 stage water filtration system. It was very basic- nothing high-end. One of the stages was a carbon filter, which I have learned harbors this bacteria, among others.

My poor husband had to call a plumber to come out and dismantle it. Then I investigated different bottled water delivery systems and came across and offer for Costco members. It offered a discount on delivery of 5 gallon bottles, and you could choose between filtered, spring, or distilled water. There was a small monthly charge for rental of the cooler/dispenser. You could order a maximum of 5 bottles per delivery, and since delivery was $12.99, we opted for the once a month.

They had the option of the water jug being placed right side up in the bottom and attached via tube inside to the upside-down bottle. That made me nervous because of the tubing, so we opted for the dispenser that operated via air displacement of the upside down jug on the dispenser.

Then I ran across an article about how these water cooler dispensers harbor microorganisms. They recommend sanitizing every 6 months, but from what I read elsewhere, they provide a constant supply of pseudomonas, etc…

I freaked out. I had been boiling my drinking water, but our water is so, so hard, that thick deposits of residue would form on the pots, and it would coat my nebulizing and other airway clearance equipment (hence the choice for water delivery).

So, we cancelled the water delivery. The jugs are too large and heavy to be lifted and poured from. Now I am back to looking at point of use filter for the kitchen faucet for all of our drinking water.

Sue, you mentioned using a 0.2 micron filter on your sink. Is there a particular one that you have been pleased with? I have read that they clog easily and need to be changed often, but I believe that they are safer and still more cost effective than the delivery. Choosing to buy cases of bottled spring water is out because of all the plastic waste and exposure to the BPA.

I don’t want to make any more wrong decisions! All this is costly, time consuming, and needlessly energy draining and stressful. I just want to get down to a routine and stick with it. Any experiences and advice would really be appreciated!

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the MAC & Bronchiectasis Support Group.

@formergardener

I am so very sorry to hear about your dog and know what comfort they bring. I understand about your kitty. Gosh, some of these changes are emotionally so much harder than others, aren’t they?
Regen99, of course we can correspond privately. I am just not sure how to do it with this site because we are not supposed to post e mails. Any suggestions?

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Thank you. so happy you are
willing to try.

I'll pursue.

Be well.

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@regen99

Former Gardener: immense help.
Bitter pills, but a good nudge.

Is living in a dry climate (Tx, assume it is dryer than Minn) better aside from the construction?

I have spent a fortune and the last l0 years helping put in a permaculture garden, being around fruit and vegetable plants. Are there filters for hoses? why do you wear nylon gloves under your garden gloves? what do you wear on your feet?

Thank you so much!

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I am STILL a gardener. I garden in Minnesota and deep South Texas. I discussed this subject at length with my ID doc. Here is what he had to say: "MAC and Bronchiectasis are diseases you live with, and you need to learn how. Learn to do what you love safely."
With his & my pulmonologist's blessing, I garden with precautions. Wet the soil/mulch before gardening working to settle the dust. Wear gloves, sleeves, pants and shoes. Take them off and wash them when you come into the house and take a shower. If you need to rake or otherwise raise dust, wear an N95 mask.
I hire out really risky jobs like pulling out big plants (sprays a lot of dust around) and dumping/spreading mulch or dirt.

As for house plants, mine are in pots deep enough to add 1" of gravel to the top to keep soil and spores from flying around. Water only when dry (varies for each plant – I use a moisture probe) and remove water from drip trays afterwards.

This strategy worked for me for asthma and allergies and continues to work now.

Remember, NTM is everywhere, you can't avoid it without encasing yourself in a sterile bubble. That is no life at all.

The point is to reduce exposure from the most pervasive and concentrated sources (like steam and mist from known NTM contaminated water.)

Then do your airway clearance to kick out the incidental germs you inhale… Everyone begins this journey thinking they have to avoid every potential for exposure. You need to learn what sets off an exacerbation for you, and then relax and keep going forward.
Sue

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@sueinmn

I am STILL a gardener. I garden in Minnesota and deep South Texas. I discussed this subject at length with my ID doc. Here is what he had to say: "MAC and Bronchiectasis are diseases you live with, and you need to learn how. Learn to do what you love safely."
With his & my pulmonologist's blessing, I garden with precautions. Wet the soil/mulch before gardening working to settle the dust. Wear gloves, sleeves, pants and shoes. Take them off and wash them when you come into the house and take a shower. If you need to rake or otherwise raise dust, wear an N95 mask.
I hire out really risky jobs like pulling out big plants (sprays a lot of dust around) and dumping/spreading mulch or dirt.

As for house plants, mine are in pots deep enough to add 1" of gravel to the top to keep soil and spores from flying around. Water only when dry (varies for each plant – I use a moisture probe) and remove water from drip trays afterwards.

This strategy worked for me for asthma and allergies and continues to work now.

Remember, NTM is everywhere, you can't avoid it without encasing yourself in a sterile bubble. That is no life at all.

The point is to reduce exposure from the most pervasive and concentrated sources (like steam and mist from known NTM contaminated water.)

Then do your airway clearance to kick out the incidental germs you inhale… Everyone begins this journey thinking they have to avoid every potential for exposure. You need to learn what sets off an exacerbation for you, and then relax and keep going forward.
Sue

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Every comment helps and supports. Thank you all so much for taking the time to respond. My doctor and nurses are not resources, and this group has helped so much. I don't feel so alone and panicky.

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Hello! I'm a carelover for my wife who has bronchiectasis and has been NTM free for 7 months. I found the Pall filter after researching several articles regarding filtration and removal of NTM from our drinking water and in hospitals. We use the Pall shower head so she can have safe water to shower and wash her hair more easily. It's not cheap. It uses state of the art technology, like silver, to keep the filter free of bacteria. The filter is rated for two months. It is independent of how much water you put through the filter. The reason for this is to prevent any risk of bacteria growth. One person mentioned the filter didn't last but a few days. My guess is their water has significant sediment which will clog the filter. I use a pre-filter (Sonaki.com SONAKI VITAPURE 350P), which I replace every two months with the Pall filter, to remove any risk of particles or sediment to clog the filter. In the attached photo you can see that after two months, the white filter is now brownish. I have copper pipes and soft water, but I still have some sediment. I would highly recommend this combination for a shower head. As for drinking water you have some options. You could capture the shower head water, but if you have poor water quality it might taste not so good. It will still be free of bacteria, but not minerals. Pall sells a filter for your sink water, but I would add a pre-filter and carbon filter and change these every two months. If there were any bacteria growth in the carbon after two months, it will still get filtered by the 0.2 micron Pall Filter. I'm still working on a simpler traveling solution for drinking, net pot and tea solution while traveling. Getting closer. My wife's current solution is boiling the water for 10 minutes to kill NTM. A new recommendation from a recent study. Hope this helps. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out. It's been a journey!

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