Share this:
chellbelle
@chellbelle

Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 23, 2018

Questions about recovering from starvation after esophageal perf

Posted by @chellbelle, Mon, Jan 22 6:36pm

I was hospitalized for a spontaneous esophageal perforation about 6 months ago. It is a very long story with multiple complications. It resulted in the doctors basically starving me for almost 6 weeks. I lost almost 50 lbs during the last 3 of those weeks due to the complications from the perforation. I was not given any nutrition other than IV fluids. Thankfully I have fully recovered from the perforation. My question is not related to the perf, but to the result of the starvation. I was somewhat physically fit prior to the hospitalization. I now have almost a “ring” around my lower abdomen of fat or bloat. It is very noticeable. I follow a strict, non-inflammatory diet and I exercise several times a week. Is this belly bloat a side effect of extreme starvation? What are some ways to help my system get back on track? I am a 30 year old female (29 at the time of hospitalization) and I have been considered “fully recovered” since the end of September. It almost seems as though the starvation had more of a lasting effect on my system than the perforation. I just don’t know enough about the long term effects of starvation and would like to gain more information so I can continue to improve my health. Thank you!

REPLY

Hi @chellbelle, and welcome to Connect. I’m so glad to hear that you have recovered from this rare, and potentially dangerous condition!
I was digging through Connect’s discussions, trying to find members who may have posted similar concerns, and although it may not directly relate to your question, I encourage you to view this Video Q&A to get a bit of insight:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/video-qa-about-non-surgical-weight-management-program/

I’d like to invite @minda77 @ldrake101 @2011panc to join in, along with @contentandwell and @chattykathy who have written about ‘loose skin or fat’ after severe weight loss in this conversation:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/post-intensive-care-syndrome-pics-lets-talk/

Gas and belly bloat are commonly known side effects of severe weight loss; @chellbelle, have you consulted with a nutritionist or dietitian? Could you share a few more details about your exercise regime?

@kanaazpereira

Hi @chellbelle, and welcome to Connect. I’m so glad to hear that you have recovered from this rare, and potentially dangerous condition!
I was digging through Connect’s discussions, trying to find members who may have posted similar concerns, and although it may not directly relate to your question, I encourage you to view this Video Q&A to get a bit of insight:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/video-qa-about-non-surgical-weight-management-program/

I’d like to invite @minda77 @ldrake101 @2011panc to join in, along with @contentandwell and @chattykathy who have written about ‘loose skin or fat’ after severe weight loss in this conversation:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/post-intensive-care-syndrome-pics-lets-talk/

Gas and belly bloat are commonly known side effects of severe weight loss; @chellbelle, have you consulted with a nutritionist or dietitian? Could you share a few more details about your exercise regime?

Jump to this post

@chellbelle @kanaazpereira I do have loose skin from my weight loss which I understand can be surgically removed (tummy tuck?) but unless extreme that is not covered by most insurance plans. Even if it was I am not sure that I would want to endure another surgery. I was under the assumption that loose skin, in a young person like you, chellbelle, would mostly improve due to your skin still having more elasticity. I know nothing about gas or Belly bloat after weight loss, but I am sure that either of those should pretty much correct itself after a certain amount of time. Even my loose skin did improve somewhat. To put it bluntly, after my transplant I looked like I had a second set of breasts because there was such a roll there, less in the middle. Now that has gone away but I will always have the “apron” of loose skin low on my belly. I too exercise a lot but at my age that is not going to help with that loose skin or the loose skin in other places.

That’s all probably not much help but I really do think it should improve a lot due to your youth. Of course you should speak to your doctor, he should be knowledgeable about it.
JK

@kanaazpereira

Hi @chellbelle, and welcome to Connect. I’m so glad to hear that you have recovered from this rare, and potentially dangerous condition!
I was digging through Connect’s discussions, trying to find members who may have posted similar concerns, and although it may not directly relate to your question, I encourage you to view this Video Q&A to get a bit of insight:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/video-qa-about-non-surgical-weight-management-program/

I’d like to invite @minda77 @ldrake101 @2011panc to join in, along with @contentandwell and @chattykathy who have written about ‘loose skin or fat’ after severe weight loss in this conversation:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/post-intensive-care-syndrome-pics-lets-talk/

Gas and belly bloat are commonly known side effects of severe weight loss; @chellbelle, have you consulted with a nutritionist or dietitian? Could you share a few more details about your exercise regime?

Jump to this post

@chellbelle and @kanaazpereira I have lost a total of 80 pounds since 2010 and have loose and sagging skin everywhere. Additionally, I am infirm and cannot exercise hard enough to firm my body much. I also have thought about having the loose skin on my belly removed but am not mentally ready to take on another surgery. I am uncertain whether my insurance would pay or not, but I expect they would since my skin breaks down due to the constant skin-on-skin overlap. The other sags (arm wings, belly-brushing boobs and waterfall legs) I will just have to live with by using a good bra, sleeves and spanx. lol
Yours, however, does not sound like overlap. I would visit with my PCP about this and possibly get some directed physical therapy. Good luck and I’m glad you are better. For myself, even though I am medically recovered, that does not mean I have returned to my former level of fitness. That may be part of what is going on for yo.

@2011panc I know I am a poor adviser on the matter of weight loss, as I have metabolic syndrome and have to fight to avoid gaining. However, just a piece of reality. Several mutations of Amyloidosis, particularly Light Chain and MM and some others, feature unintended weight loss. If you are not familiar, Amyloidosis is a disorder of misformed protein deposits. Weight loss like yours is actually fairly common in the community. If you are still uncertain of diagnosis, it would probably be helpful to be tested for Amy. A SERUM FreeLite chain assay, and proteinuria measurement, and some others are readily available. A more complete list of them is available free in my Amyloidosis Dossier at https://bit.Ly/1w7j4j8 If I can help more, please yell at me. Old Karl

Please login or register to post a reply.