Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Posted by olivia22819 @olivia22819, Wed, Sep 18 8:42pm

I am currently months before I will be turning 50, and I am finding that each month PMS is getting worse and effecting my quality of life. I suffer from migraines, irritability, crying spells and feeling blue. Has anyone experienced this and if so did it stop once menopause became official for you?

@olivia22819 – I knew that I'd run into a question about PMS and menopause somewhere along the line! Boy have you come to the right place! lol. I know it's not funny but every woman I know can tell you that just because you are a certain age or stage of menopause does not eliminate moodiness. PMS symptoms end with your period ending or within about 7 days after. Menopause or perimenopause (Perimenopause is a stage in a woman’s life that prepares her body for menopause during the 3-5 years before menopause actually hits. During this stage, your estrogen levels may rise and your other hormone levels will drop, causing a host of symptoms.) Most symptoms do not end until you finish with menopause all together.
There are changes in the body that take place prior to, during and after menopause that cause this mood upheaval. There are chemical changes in the brain and body. I could go from the sweetest, most caring woman and the next minute become a crying, growling Godzilla. Everything that you mentioned above are normal symptoms of perimenopause or her older sister.
These hormonal and chemical changes mess with our daily lives until we don't even know ourselves anymore. I thought that my hormonal teenage years were bad! Your body is losing chemicals and the rise and fall of hormones that you have depended on to keep yourself well balanced. I also don't know of any woman who could be called balanced during this time. I say this because not only do we have these physical changes but our mind doesn't ever seem to catch up with understanding these changes.
There is a positive side to this also, despite comedians and husband thinking that it never ends. I began to develop more insight and spiritual growth.
"Gail Sheehy also popularized the use of important-sounding euphemisms for menopause: “Change of Life,” “The Big M,” or simply, “The Change.” In The Change: Women, Aging, and the Menopause, Australian feminist Germaine Greer also embraced such labels, although she opted for the brisk pacing of a suspense novel to describe the process itself: “Suddenly,” Greer wrote, “something was slipping away so fast that we had not had time quite to register what it might be. All we knew was that it was irreplaceable. The way ahead seemed dark. Somewhere along the line optimism seems to have perished. Neither of us could identify this feeling of apprehensive melancholy.” Never fear, said Greer. Like Sheehy, she reassured women that menopause encourages a “journey inwards towards wisdom and serenity.”
There are ways to balance your moods with medicines, HRT's and even balancing your diet, exercise and rest.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/premenstrual-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20376780
Have you discussed these changes with your OBGYN? There are lots of ways to help you through this new "growth" stage.

REPLY

@merpreb You are spot on that was me only my son was going through adolescent at the time it was a rough period for sure . I did get some HRT at the time for awhile then the Cancer scare came out so went holistic Black Cohash was the best one for me. Im77 and still get a hot flash at times .

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@merpreb

@olivia22819 – I knew that I'd run into a question about PMS and menopause somewhere along the line! Boy have you come to the right place! lol. I know it's not funny but every woman I know can tell you that just because you are a certain age or stage of menopause does not eliminate moodiness. PMS symptoms end with your period ending or within about 7 days after. Menopause or perimenopause (Perimenopause is a stage in a woman’s life that prepares her body for menopause during the 3-5 years before menopause actually hits. During this stage, your estrogen levels may rise and your other hormone levels will drop, causing a host of symptoms.) Most symptoms do not end until you finish with menopause all together.
There are changes in the body that take place prior to, during and after menopause that cause this mood upheaval. There are chemical changes in the brain and body. I could go from the sweetest, most caring woman and the next minute become a crying, growling Godzilla. Everything that you mentioned above are normal symptoms of perimenopause or her older sister.
These hormonal and chemical changes mess with our daily lives until we don't even know ourselves anymore. I thought that my hormonal teenage years were bad! Your body is losing chemicals and the rise and fall of hormones that you have depended on to keep yourself well balanced. I also don't know of any woman who could be called balanced during this time. I say this because not only do we have these physical changes but our mind doesn't ever seem to catch up with understanding these changes.
There is a positive side to this also, despite comedians and husband thinking that it never ends. I began to develop more insight and spiritual growth.
"Gail Sheehy also popularized the use of important-sounding euphemisms for menopause: “Change of Life,” “The Big M,” or simply, “The Change.” In The Change: Women, Aging, and the Menopause, Australian feminist Germaine Greer also embraced such labels, although she opted for the brisk pacing of a suspense novel to describe the process itself: “Suddenly,” Greer wrote, “something was slipping away so fast that we had not had time quite to register what it might be. All we knew was that it was irreplaceable. The way ahead seemed dark. Somewhere along the line optimism seems to have perished. Neither of us could identify this feeling of apprehensive melancholy.” Never fear, said Greer. Like Sheehy, she reassured women that menopause encourages a “journey inwards towards wisdom and serenity.”
There are ways to balance your moods with medicines, HRT's and even balancing your diet, exercise and rest.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/premenstrual-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20376780
Have you discussed these changes with your OBGYN? There are lots of ways to help you through this new "growth" stage.

Jump to this post

I never realized how lucky I was! The only symptoms I had were HORRIBLE hot flashes, and the cessation of my migraines, so that was a good thing. The hot flashes were frequent and really bad though. I was a supervisor and then a manager with primarily young people working for me. Suddenly I would be scarlet and soaked with perspiration. Very embarrassing.
My menopause was sort of late so maybe that had something to do with fewer symptoms. I was 57.
JK

REPLY
@merpreb

@olivia22819 – I knew that I'd run into a question about PMS and menopause somewhere along the line! Boy have you come to the right place! lol. I know it's not funny but every woman I know can tell you that just because you are a certain age or stage of menopause does not eliminate moodiness. PMS symptoms end with your period ending or within about 7 days after. Menopause or perimenopause (Perimenopause is a stage in a woman’s life that prepares her body for menopause during the 3-5 years before menopause actually hits. During this stage, your estrogen levels may rise and your other hormone levels will drop, causing a host of symptoms.) Most symptoms do not end until you finish with menopause all together.
There are changes in the body that take place prior to, during and after menopause that cause this mood upheaval. There are chemical changes in the brain and body. I could go from the sweetest, most caring woman and the next minute become a crying, growling Godzilla. Everything that you mentioned above are normal symptoms of perimenopause or her older sister.
These hormonal and chemical changes mess with our daily lives until we don't even know ourselves anymore. I thought that my hormonal teenage years were bad! Your body is losing chemicals and the rise and fall of hormones that you have depended on to keep yourself well balanced. I also don't know of any woman who could be called balanced during this time. I say this because not only do we have these physical changes but our mind doesn't ever seem to catch up with understanding these changes.
There is a positive side to this also, despite comedians and husband thinking that it never ends. I began to develop more insight and spiritual growth.
"Gail Sheehy also popularized the use of important-sounding euphemisms for menopause: “Change of Life,” “The Big M,” or simply, “The Change.” In The Change: Women, Aging, and the Menopause, Australian feminist Germaine Greer also embraced such labels, although she opted for the brisk pacing of a suspense novel to describe the process itself: “Suddenly,” Greer wrote, “something was slipping away so fast that we had not had time quite to register what it might be. All we knew was that it was irreplaceable. The way ahead seemed dark. Somewhere along the line optimism seems to have perished. Neither of us could identify this feeling of apprehensive melancholy.” Never fear, said Greer. Like Sheehy, she reassured women that menopause encourages a “journey inwards towards wisdom and serenity.”
There are ways to balance your moods with medicines, HRT's and even balancing your diet, exercise and rest.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/premenstrual-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20376780
Have you discussed these changes with your OBGYN? There are lots of ways to help you through this new "growth" stage.

Jump to this post

thank you so much for your thoughtful response! i have discussed and it was brought up to consider endometrial ablation (to cease the menstral periods). i dont know that much about it and i know of a couple of people that have had it done. also not fond of surgery and especially being so close to menopause and i am not sure if i would want to take that route, however but im open to more insight on the procedure

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Hi, @olivia22819 – I'm very close in age to you, only I don't have PMS anymore cause I had a hysterectomy with prolapse repair. I remember some intense PMS prior to the surgery, however.

This Mayo Clinic information on endometrial ablation may be of interest https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/endometrial-ablation/about/pac-20393932

Does your doctor recommend this procedure for your case, then?

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@olivia22819

thank you so much for your thoughtful response! i have discussed and it was brought up to consider endometrial ablation (to cease the menstral periods). i dont know that much about it and i know of a couple of people that have had it done. also not fond of surgery and especially being so close to menopause and i am not sure if i would want to take that route, however but im open to more insight on the procedure

Jump to this post

@olivia22819 – Is there a particular reason that you want to stop your periods by surgery? Are you having other uterine problems?

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@contentandwell

I never realized how lucky I was! The only symptoms I had were HORRIBLE hot flashes, and the cessation of my migraines, so that was a good thing. The hot flashes were frequent and really bad though. I was a supervisor and then a manager with primarily young people working for me. Suddenly I would be scarlet and soaked with perspiration. Very embarrassing.
My menopause was sort of late so maybe that had something to do with fewer symptoms. I was 57.
JK

Jump to this post

@contentandwell – I could soak through my clothes from my scalp to my toes in under 4 seconds.

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@merpreb

@olivia22819 – Is there a particular reason that you want to stop your periods by surgery? Are you having other uterine problems?

Jump to this post

absolutely not. it was suggested to by a doctor because there could be a link to the migraines, however I don't prefer to bother the bodies natural process

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@lisalucier

Hi, @olivia22819 – I'm very close in age to you, only I don't have PMS anymore cause I had a hysterectomy with prolapse repair. I remember some intense PMS prior to the surgery, however.

This Mayo Clinic information on endometrial ablation may be of interest https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/endometrial-ablation/about/pac-20393932

Does your doctor recommend this procedure for your case, then?

Jump to this post

oh thank you for that info and yes it was doctor recommended

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@olivia22819

absolutely not. it was suggested to by a doctor because there could be a link to the migraines, however I don't prefer to bother the bodies natural process

Jump to this post

@olivia22819– I think that I would have chosen this also. Have you been given migraine medications?

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While I had my periods, they were usually preceded by both cranky, blue and achy PMS and downright crazy, life-has-no-meaning PMDD. Needless to say, I couldn't wait for menopause. However, my peri-menopausal years were not easy. I had memory problems and often lost my train of thought, which made my job as a lecturer difficult. I also had extremely heavy periods, and, as you describe, Olivia, migraines,not something I had experienced before. As they say, this too will pass, and it did, but not without anti-depressants and sleeping aids. Sleep hygiene did not work for me. In fact it made me so neurotic that I had to go through a professional sleep expert to undo some of the prescribed "habits" and often couldn't sleep unless the light was on. We're all different, of course, and you'll have to find what works for you, but it IS a difficult time that does get better.

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I always notice I get very sad, crying spells and feeling down right before my menstrual? what are some of the remdies for this. I have been dealing with this consistently for the last few years. What is the difference between depression and depression linked to PMS?

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@olivia22819

I always notice I get very sad, crying spells and feeling down right before my menstrual? what are some of the remdies for this. I have been dealing with this consistently for the last few years. What is the difference between depression and depression linked to PMS?

Jump to this post

Hi, @olivia22819 – I moved your post here to this discussion on premenstrual syndrome (PMS) you started previously. This is so that all the conversation on this topic can be in the same place and so that members like @merpreb @contentandwell @mscoyote @lioness could continue talking with you about your symptoms. Perhaps they have some further thoughts on the crying spells and feeling down you're experiencing before your cycle and what they feel is the difference between depression and depression linked to PMS. @lorena1egas also may have some thoughts for you.

Have you been prescribed any medication to help you with the premenstrual symptoms you have experienced, olivia22819?

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@olivia22819

I always notice I get very sad, crying spells and feeling down right before my menstrual? what are some of the remdies for this. I have been dealing with this consistently for the last few years. What is the difference between depression and depression linked to PMS?

Jump to this post

@olivia22819 – Good morning. That's a great question about depression. Depression is a universal term describing many different "down moods" Your feelings of sadness, crying spells and feeling down just prior to your period are hormone induced. I do not think that https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/premenstrual-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20376780
https://www.healthline.com/health/pms-depression
How long do these periods last, 4-5 days? Less? I hate to say this but exercise is the best remedy. Get out and bike and hike, run or walk, swim. This will help with cramps too, if they aren't severe. What a miserable time that is, I remember it well. There are also medicines. Have you spoken to your OB?

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@lisalucier

Hi, @olivia22819 – I moved your post here to this discussion on premenstrual syndrome (PMS) you started previously. This is so that all the conversation on this topic can be in the same place and so that members like @merpreb @contentandwell @mscoyote @lioness could continue talking with you about your symptoms. Perhaps they have some further thoughts on the crying spells and feeling down you're experiencing before your cycle and what they feel is the difference between depression and depression linked to PMS. @lorena1egas also may have some thoughts for you.

Have you been prescribed any medication to help you with the premenstrual symptoms you have experienced, olivia22819?

Jump to this post

@olivia22819 @lisalucier Prior to menopause, the only real PMS symptom I generally had was migraines. I did occasionally feel very slightly down, but nothing major except one time that really sticks in my mind. I was in work and everyone was heading out to lunch but I felt terrible, I felt like crying for no apparent reason. I wasn't sure what was going on. They all left and I went to the Ladies Room and sure enough, my period had started! I was so glad that was not a monthly occurrence because it really was difficult to feel that way. I am sorry that this is a regular occurrence for you.
It sounds as if you either have not discussed remedies with your doctor of your doctor has not had any that have helped. I think just knowing that it is a passing thing that will be better when you start menstruating is helpful. I am not a medical professional, but I believe there is a distinction between general depression that is a daily or almost daily occurrence and the depression you feel before menstruating. Your depression is not really neurological, it's from your hormones. When you can identify what is causing depression, and it's either hormonal like yours, or due to a specific situation, then I think that's different from depression that seems to have no apparent cause. I had some depression for a short time after a very upsetting diagnosis. My husband was concerned but my doctor told him it was justifiable, situational depression so unless it continued to not be overly concerned. Sure enough, it did pass and I was able to resume my normal life.
I think you really have to keep reminding yourself that it will pass, that's it's your hormones. For me, that would be a help.
JK

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