Phrenic Nerve damage and paralyzed diaphragm: Anyone else have this?

Posted by jgreg1954 @jgreg1954, Nov 28, 2017

Phrenic nerve on the right side was destroyed due to radiation for breast cancer. Diaphragm is now paralyzed & taking away lung capacity. Anyone else experience this?

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Lung Health Support Group.

@jwatermann

I am experiencing this.

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@jwatermann Hello, I wanted to welcome you to Connect. Did you have a question for other members who may be able to help from their own experiences? Did you have some more specific information that you wanted to share in the community? Are you being treated for a condition?

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I am getting ready to have a Sniff test done. I have a ting left lung.

We are confirming that my left lung is paralyzed.

I have trouble breathing. Simply laying down is a challenge.

My doctor suspects my Phrenic nerve has been damaged which caused the paralysis. I am hoping to get the test done soon. I really want to try stem cell therapy. Has anyone else tried this?

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Hi,
My name is Jim and I would like to know if there have been any cases where the phrenic nerve has been damaged, resulting in paralysis to a lung from having anesthesia during a surgery? This happened to me but I don't know why my left lung is paralyzed.

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@nla4625

@firefighter66. I'm not sure what your test results mean and hope you asked or will ask the doctor who ordered it to explain the results to you. I went back and read my SNIFF test results. I had no movement of my left diaphragm during regular breathing and paradoxical movement with the SNIFF deep rapid breathing, which indicated my left diaphragm was paralyzed. The report was that direct, which yours wasn't. I hope you get the help you need and deserve soon! Take care. Nancy

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Do you know what caused the left lung paralysis?

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@jimrichards

Do you know what caused the left lung paralysis?

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@jimrichards . I don't know the cause of my left paralyzed diaphragm for sure, and it's not something I spend a lot of time thinking about. The damage to my phrenic nerve that caused it to be paralyzed might have been an auto accident, fall down a flight of stairs, chiropractic manipulation, another operation, a virus, immunizations, etc. If you haven't joined, I really recommend you join the facebook group for people with paralyzed diaphragms. There are over 950 people on it with paralyzed diaphragms, which is actually a pretty rare condition. I've learned so much from them about the condition, how to deal with symptoms, etc… and gotten wonderful support. Please let me know if you have other questions. Good luck! Nancy

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@jwatermann

I am getting ready to have a Sniff test done. I have a ting left lung.

We are confirming that my left lung is paralyzed.

I have trouble breathing. Simply laying down is a challenge.

My doctor suspects my Phrenic nerve has been damaged which caused the paralysis. I am hoping to get the test done soon. I really want to try stem cell therapy. Has anyone else tried this?

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@watermann. I haven't heard about using stem cells to treat a damaged phrenic nerve or paralyzed diaphragm. Would you please post information about it? Thanks. I'm sure the 950+ on the facebook page for people with paralyzed diaphragms will be really interested in it too. I'll post it there or you might join the group and paste it there yourself if you're so inclined. It's a great group, and I've learned so much about this condition, dealing with symptoms, and treatment options. Using stem cells is a new to me intriguing possibility, and I wonder who is doing it and how it works. Thanks. Nancy

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@nla4625

@watermann. I haven't heard about using stem cells to treat a damaged phrenic nerve or paralyzed diaphragm. Would you please post information about it? Thanks. I'm sure the 950+ on the facebook page for people with paralyzed diaphragms will be really interested in it too. I'll post it there or you might join the group and paste it there yourself if you're so inclined. It's a great group, and I've learned so much about this condition, dealing with symptoms, and treatment options. Using stem cells is a new to me intriguing possibility, and I wonder who is doing it and how it works. Thanks. Nancy

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@jwatermann @nla4625
You can stay up to date on Mayo Clinic’s advances in regenerative medicine and nerve regeneration on this website:
– Center for Regenerative Medicine https://www.mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/center-regenerative-medicine/about

Neuroregeneration (stem cell therapy) is a focus area of study at Mayo Clinic. You can read more about it here: https://www.mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/center-regenerative-medicine/focus-areas/neuroregeneration

There is a great deal of hope and a great deal of hype about stem cell treatment. There are many fraudsters out there. That is why Mayo Clinic offers a free consult service. When you call the consult service, they will tell you about the availability of approved stem cell therapy at Mayo Clinic and elsewhere, and for what conditions. They can also tell you about research studies that are actively recruiting participants. Furthermore, you can add your name to a database to be notified when additional studies and information become available. You can learn more about the Consult Service here http://www.mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/center-regenerative-medicine/patient-care/clinical-services/regenerative-medicine-consult-service.
Or call 1-844-276-2003 to speak with one of Mayo's experts.

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I had a paralyzed diaphragm but no pulmonologist recognized that was why I was continually sliding downhill – coughing, no energy, short of breath with any exertion, weight loss. It wasn't until my Thoracic Surgeon, who I was seeing after being found a candidate for a lung transplant, recognized that my mild fibroids could NOT be causing such extreme symptoms. He offered the chance to either go for the double lung transplant or try the Diaphragm Plication procedure to stitch it back in place. Much less recovery time, and a good chance it could relieve my symptoms enough to buy me as many years as a transplant. I had the surgery 27 June of this year – robotically! – at UW-Madison. My internal organs had been crammed and pushed – my stomach had moved under my rib cage – no wonder I could not eat and lost weight. In the two months since surgery, I can say it has been a true life-changer! I can garden, do laundry, walk, – no more napping the afternoons away and no more eating half cup of food at a time. My husband says "I got my wife back!" — after over one year of just thinking I had to face a transplant or die. There are several tests they can prescribe which can verify that is the problem – but it's so much less invasive and recovery time is so short. I had about 5 incisions and drain tubes for a few days, but I am very healthy otherwise so my story may be different from others. By the way, I turned 74 in the hospital!

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Hello… I am new here. My son was diagnosed with Peripheral nerve sheath cancer two weeks ago. He has since had surgery and it was removed. His CT and Mri scans are clear. There are so many contradictory information. If I could ask for any information that would be awesome.

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@stellacammarano

Hello… I am new here. My son was diagnosed with Peripheral nerve sheath cancer two weeks ago. He has since had surgery and it was removed. His CT and Mri scans are clear. There are so many contradictory information. If I could ask for any information that would be awesome.

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Welcome, @stellacammarano. You will find members talking about malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in this discussion found here:
– Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/malignant-peripheral-nerve-sheath-tumor/

Click the link and join the conversation.

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