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lynnmarie45
@lynnmarie45

Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 24, 2017

Pelvic floor pain after menopause

Posted by @lynnmarie45, Aug 23, 2017

I have pelvic floor pain and have been told I have tight muscles with inflammation in tissues and have a real problem with sitting. I am a 71 female and would like to know if anyone has some suggestions or has the same problem?

REPLY

Hi @lynnmarie45, welcome to Connect.
I moved your message to the Women’s Health group to introduce you to others who are talking about pelvic floor dysfunction and pain. Please meet @pizon @darlia and @upartist. Upartist, I’m wondering if you could talk a bit more about the pelvic floor rehab you’ve done and how it helped you.

I think you might all appreciate watching this Video Q&A session about Pelvic Floor Disorder that we did with Dr. Johnny Yi last May: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/facebook-live-pelvic-floor-disorder-with-dr-johnny-yi/

Lynn Marie, do you know what has caused the tight muscles and inflammation? Have you been given exercises to help release the tight muscles or been referred to physical therapy?

Colleen,
This video was very informative. Thank you for sharing the link. And for sure, anyone with the questions and symptoms posted on this blog should view this video. The physician speaking explained a point, among many, which is relevant to me. This point is that pelvic floor management is ongoing. The surgeries don’t “fix” the problem, but rather decrease symptoms and facilitate function. While I am quite aware of this, I do need to hear it over and over, as I deal with managing my symptoms and adjusting my routines and life style as I age. I have been dealing with pelvic floor dysfunction for lots of years, and the available medical information is growing by leaps and bounds. The point this physician made on coordination of the musculature is a huge player in managing symptoms and function. While his study used female triathletes, the results are relevant to older women who are truly attempting to stay fit. My upcoming pelvic floor physical therapy will use biofeedback with internally placed monitors and externally placed electrodes. It will provide objective information on relaxation/contraction coordination, and then build those skills with the guidance of the therapist. When we do the kiegal exercises, we may have trouble coordinating the movement patterns, especially in the relaxation portion; even though we feel relaxed, for instance, we may not actually achieve “relaxed”. This constant tension of the pelvic girdle musculature, can create spasm and then, of course, “pain”. It can also create an inability to pass stool, even flow of urine, or pain free sitting in a chair. There may also be uneven tightness and shortening of small hip flexors causing this tension. This cannot be addressed with the use of the kiegal. High impact exercise may be contributing to pain and spasm symptoms. I have questions which I plan to ask the physical therapist, as my success in managing my pelvic floor symptoms wanes and ebbs with each year and with my activities. Anyone reading this, please view the video. It will help.
Respectfully,
UPArtist

@upartist

Colleen,
This video was very informative. Thank you for sharing the link. And for sure, anyone with the questions and symptoms posted on this blog should view this video. The physician speaking explained a point, among many, which is relevant to me. This point is that pelvic floor management is ongoing. The surgeries don’t “fix” the problem, but rather decrease symptoms and facilitate function. While I am quite aware of this, I do need to hear it over and over, as I deal with managing my symptoms and adjusting my routines and life style as I age. I have been dealing with pelvic floor dysfunction for lots of years, and the available medical information is growing by leaps and bounds. The point this physician made on coordination of the musculature is a huge player in managing symptoms and function. While his study used female triathletes, the results are relevant to older women who are truly attempting to stay fit. My upcoming pelvic floor physical therapy will use biofeedback with internally placed monitors and externally placed electrodes. It will provide objective information on relaxation/contraction coordination, and then build those skills with the guidance of the therapist. When we do the kiegal exercises, we may have trouble coordinating the movement patterns, especially in the relaxation portion; even though we feel relaxed, for instance, we may not actually achieve “relaxed”. This constant tension of the pelvic girdle musculature, can create spasm and then, of course, “pain”. It can also create an inability to pass stool, even flow of urine, or pain free sitting in a chair. There may also be uneven tightness and shortening of small hip flexors causing this tension. This cannot be addressed with the use of the kiegal. High impact exercise may be contributing to pain and spasm symptoms. I have questions which I plan to ask the physical therapist, as my success in managing my pelvic floor symptoms wanes and ebbs with each year and with my activities. Anyone reading this, please view the video. It will help.
Respectfully,
UPArtist

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Thank you when I get the time I too will look at this video…..I am currently using the crystal wand and it is very helpful…unfourtley I was told by my dr. after the surgery it would be a cure all and so far 5 months out that dose not seem to be the case I am starting to strengthen very slowly and love my therapist also working on all the above and she too agrees with the dr. that it may be a long road but I should be pain free and the surgery should correct my problem hears hoping that is true

Hi, @lynnmarie45. In your last post you mentioned having pelvic floor pain and having trouble sitting. How that is going? Are you finding anything that provides relief?

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