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ladybugmg
@ladybugmg

Posts: 98
Joined: Oct 17, 2017

New Mental health discoveries about addiction, anxiety and depression

Posted by @ladybugmg, Mon, Apr 16 10:49am

New research finds that the hippocampus may yield important clues for a range of mental health illnesses including addiction, anxiety and depression.

The hippocampus is an area of the brain commonly linked with memory and dementia.

But new U of T Scarborough research finds that it may also yield important clues about a range of mental health illnesses including addiction, anxiety and depression.

The research, authored by a team of neuroscientists, found that a specific part of the hippocampus could play an important role in emotional regulation, a finding that calls into question our understanding of how exactly this part of the brain works.

Read more: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180414171606.htm

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Thank you, ladybug, for this very interesting information. I’ll bet MY hippocampus is out of whack, since I’ve suffered for years with anxiety. Will look into this! In the meantime, I’m doing over-the-counter recommended remedies in an effort to feel better: magnesium, vitamin B-12 under the tongue, etc. Geeeez!!

I am glad you found the information helpful. There is so much hopeful research continuing and I feel confident a way will be found to help anxiety and depression without drugs that have so many side effects. Good for you to being pro-active! I hope to continue to send information about new brain research to Mayo Connect so that folks can know that there are dedicated people searching for answers and bringing sunshine back into their lives.

Study connects fear behavior, rhythmic breathing, brain smell center
Date:
April 20, 2018
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
There's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion. Now researchers have added neurons associated with the olfactory system to the connection between behavior and breathing. Connecting patterns in these interactions may help explain why practices such as meditation and yoga that rely on rhythmic breathing can help people overcome anxiety-based illnesses.

Read more https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180420170558.htm

@ladybugmg

Study connects fear behavior, rhythmic breathing, brain smell center
Date:
April 20, 2018
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
There's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion. Now researchers have added neurons associated with the olfactory system to the connection between behavior and breathing. Connecting patterns in these interactions may help explain why practices such as meditation and yoga that rely on rhythmic breathing can help people overcome anxiety-based illnesses.

Read more https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180420170558.htm

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Meditation could help anxiety and cardiovascular health
Date:
April 20, 2018
Source:
Michigan Technological University
Summary:
In a student-led study, one hour of mindfulness meditation shown to reduce anxiety and some cardiovascular risk markers.
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FULL STORY
________________________________________
It sounds like a late-night commercial: In just one hour you can reduce your anxiety levels and some heart health risk factors. But a recent study with 14 participants shows preliminary data that even a single session of meditation can have cardiovascular and psychological benefits for adults with mild to moderate anxiety.

Read more https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180420122810.htm

@ladybugmg

Study connects fear behavior, rhythmic breathing, brain smell center
Date:
April 20, 2018
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
There's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion. Now researchers have added neurons associated with the olfactory system to the connection between behavior and breathing. Connecting patterns in these interactions may help explain why practices such as meditation and yoga that rely on rhythmic breathing can help people overcome anxiety-based illnesses.

Read more https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180420170558.htm

Jump to this post

Addiction 

Jean Cary-

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