Mysterious shortness of breath

Posted by gabrielm @gabrielm, May 31, 2018

I will try to make this as short as possible, but this has been going on for over 5 years, so it might be farily long. 

Beginning in summer of 2012, I began having shortness of breath (SOB) with no other symptoms. I felt a constant need to yawn, and every few breaths wouldn't satisfy the SOB. I would take a deep breath, and felt like it would get "stuck" before satisfying the air hunger feeling. About every 3-5 deep breaths would satisfy it, only for it to return a minute later. 

I got an endoscopy and other tests done, which revealed that I had some esophageal erosion due to acid reflux and a slight hiatal hernia and was diagnosed with GERD. I had always have bad heartburn, so I was prescribed with Prilosec, which I have been taking daily since them. I've tried stopping it a few times but the reflux always comes back a lot worse. 

Lung tests and x-rays were normal. Heart tests normal. Blood test revealed a slight anemia but otherwise pretty normal. 

I did some research reading forums where someone suggested taking vitamin B-12. Strangely, I took it and the SOB disappeared almost instantly. However, it only lasted a few days for it to return just as bad. I then started taking an iron supplement, which again made the SOB disappear quickly- same thing; symptom returned days later. 

After further research, I came across a breathing exercise method called the Buteyko method. Essentially you do a lot of breath holding to build up CO2 and reduce breathing as the theory is that I had chronic hyperventilation causing too much CO2 to exit my body. After applying the method and reducing my breathing, the SOB disappeared after only 2 days and I felt completely normal. I continued the method a few more days then no longer felt the need to pursue the exercises. I was normal for a whole year when the SOB once again returned with some chest tightness. I applied the method again and the symptom went away, this time with a little more effort; after about 3 weeks. I included physical exercise which also helped with my breathing. 

After that, I was normal for about 2 years. I mistakenly stopped or at least slowed down exercise and the SOB returned once again. I applied the method and began running for exercise but the SOB kept getting worse. It got so bad, I had multiple panic attacks and the feeling of completely empty lungs with the inability to satisfy it with deep breaths. I had to stop exercise altogether, apply the Buteyko method and do breathing exercises very carefully with very light and slow exercise. This helped, but it took many weeks for the SOB to improve. Then, it was almost normal when over a year ago as I was running, I couldn't get a deep breath to satisfy exercise-induced SOB. I have had SOB continuously since then (a year and a half). 

I once again started doing breathing exercises and slowly building up physical exercise, but I can't do any prolonged cardio activity because the SOB gets to a point where deep breathing will not satisfy it. While the breathing exercises have helped, they have had very little effect compared to previous efforts. It seems that every time the symptom returned, greater effort yields few results.

I suspect there is something, some underlying cause that is causing the SOB that has alluded me this entire time. 

So for the past few months to a year, the SOB is worse on some days, better on others, but never gone. There's no rhyme or reason or pattern for it. It's just there, sometimes affecting my sleep. I sometimes can't get a deep breath to satisfy it every now and then, but for the most part, a big gulp of air will satisfy it. But it returns seconds to minutes later. It's as though every breath doesn't deliver what it's supposed to, the SOB builds up, and then I have to take a big gulp of air to get rid of the feeling, pattern repeats. My breathing pattern is normal, however. I don't feel like anything physical is happening, but sometimes it feels like my airways and nostrils are slightly inflamed due to allergies, but when I don't feel inflammation the SOB is still there. 

Recent lung function tests show normal- I don't have asthma, or any other problems with my lungs. Heart tests are normal though I did have about a two week bout of heart palpitations which came and went. Haven't had any for a while- it just mysteriously started happening then stopped. Blood tests are normal, though tests always show a slight elevation of biliruben which my doc thinks is Gilbert's disease. 

I don't have sleep apnea (normal test), bloody oxygenation is normal, heart rate normal. 

I recently saw local naturopath (since mainstream docs aren't able to help) who immediately suspected a liver problem when I described my SOB, possibly liver inflammation. He used an electrodermal testing machine to test his theory which did seem to show a problem with my liver and gallbladder. He gave me digestive enzymes and a gallbladder formula to help clear a bile duct clog, thus reducing liver inflammation. He also determined with the machine that I have an egg sensitivity so I've been avoiding eggs. 

Been taking this and avoiding eggs for a couple of months, but there has been no noticeable improvement. Everything else is normal. Emotionally I'm normal- no anxiety, depression, etc. The SOB seems to be the only symptom of something, but always comes back worse, until a year and half ago when it came back and has remained since. I feel like I shouldn't have to do breath holding exercises every day just to maintain my breathing well enough to do every day things. 

Does anyone have any idea of a possible underlying cause?

Ok I'm going to come at this from a totally different angle as I honestly feel like I am cured (or 95% better).

I'll start from the beginning – I had exactly the same as it's been explained on here – felt like I could never get a satisfactory (deep) breath and when I did it was instant relief until the feeling would come again a couple of minutes of later and I'd have to do it again (which I couldn't always get the perfect deep breath and I would keep trying until I did when I'd get instant relief until a minute later). It started to consume my every thought – there wasn't a day went by when I wasn't thinking or 'feeling' about my breath. It was affecting my whole life, particularly my sleep. After about 3 weeks I went to the doctor (who prescribed me some sleeping tablets as I was at my wits end). From there I had lung x-rays, spirometry tests, heart tests, a brain MRI, was prescribed valium, anti-depressants, went to a psychologist, went to a respiratory physiotherapist, went to a buteyko instructor (only breathing through your nose), I even got hypnotised!! This all went on for a period of around 18 months and no-one could work out what was wrong with me (and nothing medically showed up).

I then started to think maybe this was psychological – I had never had any anxiety previously (I am in my mid 50's) or basically any medical issues my entire life. I would be the last person you would call stressed or anxious! Anyway after doing weeks and weeks of research I now honestly believe I had a form of OCD called sensorimotor OCD. It all started when I woke up in the middle of the night and tried to take a deep breath and couldn't and it totally stressed me out. I managed to go back to sleep but the first thing I thought of when I woke up was whether I could take the breath again and that's where it all started – it basically didn't stop from that morning on. I believe for some reason at that moment in time my brain held on to that anxiety of that feeling and the only thing that would relieve it was to take a deep breath.

I believe the urge to take the deep breath is the obsession and the taking of the deep breath is the compulsion that relieves the anxiety of the obsession. From there it just goes around and around in a big circle forever until you treat it. It's no different to feeling an urge to wash you hands and relieving the anxiety by washing your hands until you get the feeling again to wash your hands 2 minutes later.

In saying all this there are not a lot of 'medical' professionals who know about other forms of OCD. If you google sensorimotor OCD (blinking, swallowing, breathing) you will find it is quite a common thing. The way I have helped myself (and this has taken a good 6 months and I'm still going) is just to learn to sit with the (terrible) feeling of needing to take the breath and gradually the anxiety that goes with it has just lowered and lowered. I started running and doing spin classes again even though that terrified me because I thought I wouldn't be able to breath. I've literally changed the way I think – I don't let it stress me out – if I need to take a deep breath I do it without judging myself (everyone takes deep breaths at sometime during the day they just don't have a second thought about it). The whole aim is to lower the anxiety that goes with the thought/feeling of constantly needing to think about controlling your breathing. I know for a fact there is nothing medically wrong with me (after having literally my entire body scanned/checked) and I sleep all night (now) obviously without needing to take a deep breath so it was just a very slow process of turning my thinking around. I had to let go of the belief that there was going to be some magic medication that was going to fix me. It's a very slow process but it 100% does work.

I am now not taking any drugs, exercising and basically enjoying my life. Previously even just thinking back to how I felt I would start to get the feeling in my throat/chest that I needed to relieve by taking a very deep breath but now I can think about it without getting that feeling.

I hope this helps someone – it is a terrible feeling to live with constantly and if you let it it could totally take over your life (which is what OCD does).

Good luck.

REPLY
@jezzy

Ok I'm going to come at this from a totally different angle as I honestly feel like I am cured (or 95% better).

I'll start from the beginning – I had exactly the same as it's been explained on here – felt like I could never get a satisfactory (deep) breath and when I did it was instant relief until the feeling would come again a couple of minutes of later and I'd have to do it again (which I couldn't always get the perfect deep breath and I would keep trying until I did when I'd get instant relief until a minute later). It started to consume my every thought – there wasn't a day went by when I wasn't thinking or 'feeling' about my breath. It was affecting my whole life, particularly my sleep. After about 3 weeks I went to the doctor (who prescribed me some sleeping tablets as I was at my wits end). From there I had lung x-rays, spirometry tests, heart tests, a brain MRI, was prescribed valium, anti-depressants, went to a psychologist, went to a respiratory physiotherapist, went to a buteyko instructor (only breathing through your nose), I even got hypnotised!! This all went on for a period of around 18 months and no-one could work out what was wrong with me (and nothing medically showed up).

I then started to think maybe this was psychological – I had never had any anxiety previously (I am in my mid 50's) or basically any medical issues my entire life. I would be the last person you would call stressed or anxious! Anyway after doing weeks and weeks of research I now honestly believe I had a form of OCD called sensorimotor OCD. It all started when I woke up in the middle of the night and tried to take a deep breath and couldn't and it totally stressed me out. I managed to go back to sleep but the first thing I thought of when I woke up was whether I could take the breath again and that's where it all started – it basically didn't stop from that morning on. I believe for some reason at that moment in time my brain held on to that anxiety of that feeling and the only thing that would relieve it was to take a deep breath.

I believe the urge to take the deep breath is the obsession and the taking of the deep breath is the compulsion that relieves the anxiety of the obsession. From there it just goes around and around in a big circle forever until you treat it. It's no different to feeling an urge to wash you hands and relieving the anxiety by washing your hands until you get the feeling again to wash your hands 2 minutes later.

In saying all this there are not a lot of 'medical' professionals who know about other forms of OCD. If you google sensorimotor OCD (blinking, swallowing, breathing) you will find it is quite a common thing. The way I have helped myself (and this has taken a good 6 months and I'm still going) is just to learn to sit with the (terrible) feeling of needing to take the breath and gradually the anxiety that goes with it has just lowered and lowered. I started running and doing spin classes again even though that terrified me because I thought I wouldn't be able to breath. I've literally changed the way I think – I don't let it stress me out – if I need to take a deep breath I do it without judging myself (everyone takes deep breaths at sometime during the day they just don't have a second thought about it). The whole aim is to lower the anxiety that goes with the thought/feeling of constantly needing to think about controlling your breathing. I know for a fact there is nothing medically wrong with me (after having literally my entire body scanned/checked) and I sleep all night (now) obviously without needing to take a deep breath so it was just a very slow process of turning my thinking around. I had to let go of the belief that there was going to be some magic medication that was going to fix me. It's a very slow process but it 100% does work.

I am now not taking any drugs, exercising and basically enjoying my life. Previously even just thinking back to how I felt I would start to get the feeling in my throat/chest that I needed to relieve by taking a very deep breath but now I can think about it without getting that feeling.

I hope this helps someone – it is a terrible feeling to live with constantly and if you let it it could totally take over your life (which is what OCD does).

Good luck.

Jump to this post

@jezzy– Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. And thank you for sharing your eye-opening journey. Many of us do have possible underlying causes for SOB but as yet have not found the connection. Learning to "control" the times at its worst must feel like you've climbed Mt. Everest! Being grounded is a means of controlling yourself that is so essential to good health and self-care. There are many exercises that can help with this, and here are a few.
https://www.healthline.com/health/grounding-techniques
Sometimes I don't even realize how uptight I am and when I finally do I am beyond just sitting down and putting my feet on the ground and calming myself. What has worked the best for you?

REPLY
@jezzy

Ok I'm going to come at this from a totally different angle as I honestly feel like I am cured (or 95% better).

I'll start from the beginning – I had exactly the same as it's been explained on here – felt like I could never get a satisfactory (deep) breath and when I did it was instant relief until the feeling would come again a couple of minutes of later and I'd have to do it again (which I couldn't always get the perfect deep breath and I would keep trying until I did when I'd get instant relief until a minute later). It started to consume my every thought – there wasn't a day went by when I wasn't thinking or 'feeling' about my breath. It was affecting my whole life, particularly my sleep. After about 3 weeks I went to the doctor (who prescribed me some sleeping tablets as I was at my wits end). From there I had lung x-rays, spirometry tests, heart tests, a brain MRI, was prescribed valium, anti-depressants, went to a psychologist, went to a respiratory physiotherapist, went to a buteyko instructor (only breathing through your nose), I even got hypnotised!! This all went on for a period of around 18 months and no-one could work out what was wrong with me (and nothing medically showed up).

I then started to think maybe this was psychological – I had never had any anxiety previously (I am in my mid 50's) or basically any medical issues my entire life. I would be the last person you would call stressed or anxious! Anyway after doing weeks and weeks of research I now honestly believe I had a form of OCD called sensorimotor OCD. It all started when I woke up in the middle of the night and tried to take a deep breath and couldn't and it totally stressed me out. I managed to go back to sleep but the first thing I thought of when I woke up was whether I could take the breath again and that's where it all started – it basically didn't stop from that morning on. I believe for some reason at that moment in time my brain held on to that anxiety of that feeling and the only thing that would relieve it was to take a deep breath.

I believe the urge to take the deep breath is the obsession and the taking of the deep breath is the compulsion that relieves the anxiety of the obsession. From there it just goes around and around in a big circle forever until you treat it. It's no different to feeling an urge to wash you hands and relieving the anxiety by washing your hands until you get the feeling again to wash your hands 2 minutes later.

In saying all this there are not a lot of 'medical' professionals who know about other forms of OCD. If you google sensorimotor OCD (blinking, swallowing, breathing) you will find it is quite a common thing. The way I have helped myself (and this has taken a good 6 months and I'm still going) is just to learn to sit with the (terrible) feeling of needing to take the breath and gradually the anxiety that goes with it has just lowered and lowered. I started running and doing spin classes again even though that terrified me because I thought I wouldn't be able to breath. I've literally changed the way I think – I don't let it stress me out – if I need to take a deep breath I do it without judging myself (everyone takes deep breaths at sometime during the day they just don't have a second thought about it). The whole aim is to lower the anxiety that goes with the thought/feeling of constantly needing to think about controlling your breathing. I know for a fact there is nothing medically wrong with me (after having literally my entire body scanned/checked) and I sleep all night (now) obviously without needing to take a deep breath so it was just a very slow process of turning my thinking around. I had to let go of the belief that there was going to be some magic medication that was going to fix me. It's a very slow process but it 100% does work.

I am now not taking any drugs, exercising and basically enjoying my life. Previously even just thinking back to how I felt I would start to get the feeling in my throat/chest that I needed to relieve by taking a very deep breath but now I can think about it without getting that feeling.

I hope this helps someone – it is a terrible feeling to live with constantly and if you let it it could totally take over your life (which is what OCD does).

Good luck.

Jump to this post

You’ve just explained my daily and nightly life. Waking up thinking when is it gonna start only to start feeling sob 10- 30 second later. I’ve already attributed to physiological and then back to physical and back….

It’s exhausting for me and the people around me as well. FYI I’m not glad other people have this because I always tell my wife “I wouldnt wish this on my worst enemy” but knowing I’m not alone and just reading these threads, I feel better even for that small window.

Thanks and I’ll try your methods. Breath easy everybody

REPLY
@merpreb

@jezzy– Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. And thank you for sharing your eye-opening journey. Many of us do have possible underlying causes for SOB but as yet have not found the connection. Learning to "control" the times at its worst must feel like you've climbed Mt. Everest! Being grounded is a means of controlling yourself that is so essential to good health and self-care. There are many exercises that can help with this, and here are a few.
https://www.healthline.com/health/grounding-techniques
Sometimes I don't even realize how uptight I am and when I finally do I am beyond just sitting down and putting my feet on the ground and calming myself. What has worked the best for you?

Jump to this post

The thing that has worked most for me is just going with it and not fighting against it. I've just exposed myself to the feelings and tried to hang out not taking the deep breath (which when I first started wasn't for long at all and was basically hell). After 6 months I'm an expert at it as I no longer associate that feeling with being anxious and needing to take a deep breath to relieve it and my brain has let go of it. Also just getting back into exercise, life in general and brushing it off (again easier said than done but just stick with it). As I said previously I honestly believe I had a form of Sensorimotor OCD so what I've basically done is a form of ERP (Exposure and Response Prevention) which in a nutshell is facing you fear and refraining from doing the compulsion (in my case the deep breath). It took me a long time to accept there was nothing medically wrong with me and that it was in my head but it's 100% worked for me.

REPLY

Hello! I have been experiencing these same symptoms for the past 3 years. I have been to a doctor twice and have been prescribed allergy medication and an inhaler, both of which did not work. I am able to exercise completely fine, and it has been more of an annoyance than anything. Still, I would love to not be taking deep breaths constantly or trying to yawn without success. Wondering if you have found any answers over the last two years? Thanks!

REPLY
@rosey5713

Hello! I have been experiencing these same symptoms for the past 3 years. I have been to a doctor twice and have been prescribed allergy medication and an inhaler, both of which did not work. I am able to exercise completely fine, and it has been more of an annoyance than anything. Still, I would love to not be taking deep breaths constantly or trying to yawn without success. Wondering if you have found any answers over the last two years? Thanks!

Jump to this post

Minerals ( in their alkaline form–especially magnesium), bicarbonates, fruits and vegetables, alkaline diet.

REPLY
@rosey5713

Hello! I have been experiencing these same symptoms for the past 3 years. I have been to a doctor twice and have been prescribed allergy medication and an inhaler, both of which did not work. I am able to exercise completely fine, and it has been more of an annoyance than anything. Still, I would love to not be taking deep breaths constantly or trying to yawn without success. Wondering if you have found any answers over the last two years? Thanks!

Jump to this post

Hi @rosey5713. I have not found answers in the sense that it's completely gone, but I have been able to manage the condition through breathing exercises and moderate physical exercise. So it's an annoyance at this point, but manageable.

REPLY
@rosey5713

Hello! I have been experiencing these same symptoms for the past 3 years. I have been to a doctor twice and have been prescribed allergy medication and an inhaler, both of which did not work. I am able to exercise completely fine, and it has been more of an annoyance than anything. Still, I would love to not be taking deep breaths constantly or trying to yawn without success. Wondering if you have found any answers over the last two years? Thanks!

Jump to this post

@rosey5713– Good morning and welcome to Mayo Connect. My apologies for not welcoming you sooner. This mysterious shortness of breath has so many of us stumbling and bumbling along until we wind up exhausted from visiting doctors, having tests, sleepless nights, and worrying if breathing will just stop one day. I encourage you to read as many posts as you can to see if anyone else has experienced similar symptoms with your activity level. There is something that is called Exercise-induced SOB and exercise-induced asthma.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/exercise-induced-asthma/symptoms-causes/syc-20372300
Has your doctor mentioned having asthma when he/she prescribed inhalers? Have you had a lung function test?

REPLY

Ok guys I am pleased to inform you that I cured perfectly from mysterious short of breath that everyone is talking about, and I got rid of it after several checkups with neurologist + abdominal doctors.
There is a reason triggered it first which is Acid reflux in my case, you may have different trigger, acid reflux later on had gone, but my body still didn't understand it.
After getting acid reflux due to several reasons among them:
1. Lying face down for massage for long time.
2. Wrong style in eating food.
3. Fast food like potato
4. Too oily food
And drinking too much cold drinks on an empty stomach, this all led to acid reflux after abdominal pain.

Now bear with me to understand what happened, acid reflux couses you to feel short of breath, which is well known to anyone, however, after getting medical attention and the reflux is gone, your body still in the same situation feeling short of breath, so it becomes a habit now, in the medical world, they call it 'a Tik'
Something that is similar to the word "syndrome", taking deep breath becomes something like a habit that you can't relax without doing it.
After understanding my situation, I was resisting the feeling to do it, the doctor told me to skip one every time, and compensate with another, until you minimize it to zero, but normal human being do it from time to time, I noticed it in my child while he is sleeping.
So this is all of it, I hope everyone shares my post and start doing what I did to get rid of it completely like I did.
Please note that too much responsibilities can make you do it from time to time, so control your anxiety level and understand that this kind of feeling the need to take a deep breath becomes a habit, the body doesn't feel ok if it doesn't do it.

Please try to breath from your mouth all the times, do you yawn a lot then?

REPLY
@favilavir

Ok guys I am pleased to inform you that I cured perfectly from mysterious short of breath that everyone is talking about, and I got rid of it after several checkups with neurologist + abdominal doctors.
There is a reason triggered it first which is Acid reflux in my case, you may have different trigger, acid reflux later on had gone, but my body still didn't understand it.
After getting acid reflux due to several reasons among them:
1. Lying face down for massage for long time.
2. Wrong style in eating food.
3. Fast food like potato
4. Too oily food
And drinking too much cold drinks on an empty stomach, this all led to acid reflux after abdominal pain.

Now bear with me to understand what happened, acid reflux couses you to feel short of breath, which is well known to anyone, however, after getting medical attention and the reflux is gone, your body still in the same situation feeling short of breath, so it becomes a habit now, in the medical world, they call it 'a Tik'
Something that is similar to the word "syndrome", taking deep breath becomes something like a habit that you can't relax without doing it.
After understanding my situation, I was resisting the feeling to do it, the doctor told me to skip one every time, and compensate with another, until you minimize it to zero, but normal human being do it from time to time, I noticed it in my child while he is sleeping.
So this is all of it, I hope everyone shares my post and start doing what I did to get rid of it completely like I did.
Please note that too much responsibilities can make you do it from time to time, so control your anxiety level and understand that this kind of feeling the need to take a deep breath becomes a habit, the body doesn't feel ok if it doesn't do it.

Please try to breath from your mouth all the times, do you yawn a lot then?

Jump to this post

@favilavir– This is wonderful news for you and you must feel on top of the world. A lot of us have GERD as the cause of our SOB, but many of us do not. There are so many other reasons for it and this is why someone called it "mysterious", very aptly, I would say.

There is more to mouth breathing than just opening your mouth and inhaling. I'm going to link a video so that you can get the whole picture. It begins with inhaling through your nose and exhaling, with pursed lips. Your breath needs to fill your belly, not your upper chest.

Does this make sense?

REPLY
@merpreb

@rosey5713– Good morning and welcome to Mayo Connect. My apologies for not welcoming you sooner. This mysterious shortness of breath has so many of us stumbling and bumbling along until we wind up exhausted from visiting doctors, having tests, sleepless nights, and worrying if breathing will just stop one day. I encourage you to read as many posts as you can to see if anyone else has experienced similar symptoms with your activity level. There is something that is called Exercise-induced SOB and exercise-induced asthma.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/exercise-induced-asthma/symptoms-causes/syc-20372300
Has your doctor mentioned having asthma when he/she prescribed inhalers? Have you had a lung function test?

Jump to this post

Hello, thank you for your reply! When I was around 10, I was told I have exercise-induced asthma, but it has not bothered me in over 5 years. I did recently take the lung function test again, and was prescribed a new inhaler. That's what I assumed this shortness of breath was from, but it does not seem to get worse when I am exercising and the inhaler I have does not make any difference in relieving it.

REPLY

@rosey5713– I have lung cancer and my pulmonologist just changed my inhaler too. I take Trellegy. It's wonderful. What were you switched to? Do you know of a way to control this asthma?

Here is a link to help you gain more control of your breathing during and after exercise while continuing your inhaler
https://rocketpure.com/blogs/news/controlling-exercise-induced-asthma-without-medication

REPLY

Hey, wanted to pop in to give an update.

I've been on Lexapro now five weeks, and the last three or so days I've kind of stopped doing the breathing stuff unless I really think about it. I believe it was anxiety/OCD driving this. I truly believe healing is possible.

REPLY
@qbug

Hey, wanted to pop in to give an update.

I've been on Lexapro now five weeks, and the last three or so days I've kind of stopped doing the breathing stuff unless I really think about it. I believe it was anxiety/OCD driving this. I truly believe healing is possible.

Jump to this post

@qbug– Good morning and thank you for getting back to us! This is good news for you. Anxiety, which is my middle name, can wreak havoc on so much of our bodies. I hope that you can move forward now and use some great relaxing techniques so that perhaps you can wean off of Lexapro at some time in the future. Keep in touch please.
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/depression-anxiety/
How have you handled anxiety in the past?

REPLY
@merpreb

@qbug– Good morning and thank you for getting back to us! This is good news for you. Anxiety, which is my middle name, can wreak havoc on so much of our bodies. I hope that you can move forward now and use some great relaxing techniques so that perhaps you can wean off of Lexapro at some time in the future. Keep in touch please.
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/depression-anxiety/
How have you handled anxiety in the past?

Jump to this post

I haven't handled it well. This is the first time I've used an AD to tackle it. I am now almost 6 weeks in and the breathing thing is 90% gone. I don't think about it and I found myself yawning last night because I was tired and wow, it was automatic!! Amazing!

So I encourage those suffering to try an OCD/anxiety targeted medication.

REPLY
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