Living with arthritis: How do you stay active?

Posted by Justin McClanahan @JustinMcClanahan, Mar 9, 2020

Let’s talk about trying to stay active while living with arthritis. More than 50 million Americans suffer from arthritis and it is the No. 1 cause of disability in the country. Arthritis can be painful and debilitating, preventing many who have it from being active or doing the things they once enjoyed. The changes in physical capabilities can also have an effect on mental health as well. If you have arthritis, what sort of activities have you had to give up and how has that affected you? Have you found ways to adapt your activities or found new ones?

Let’s start by introducing ourselves.

@colleenyoung

Hi @suz55, you're in the right group (Bones, Joints & Muscles https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/arthritis-and-joint-conditions-268850/) to talk about arthritis. You'll notice that I moved your message to this discussion called "Living with arthritis: How do you stay active?" I did this to introduce you to other members living with arthritis like @migizii @jimhd @trayus @beatricefay @houp528123 and @sueinmn and who can recommend which specialist to see.

Suz, what physical movements do you do in the morning to help loosen up?

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Just getting up and moving about helps, feeding my dog, making coffee. Also sitting and doing the yes and no movements with my neck very slowly and reaching up in an apple picking motion. When I first get up, I cannot raise my arms to put eye drops in. I am thankful I loosen up pretty fast.

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@sueinmn My O.A
In my hands is getting worse
New pain symptom woke me up during sleep .It never did this before .I have my Meloxicam I take but it didn't keep my pain away last night .

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Good morning – We just had a gathering of 6 lifelong friends last evening, and naturally talk turned to health for a while as we are all of "a certain age" – all of us have some degree of arthritis – several have both osteo- and rheumatoid types, some for 30 years or more. But you couldn't find a greater example of living well with a chronic condition – I truly believe staying active, positive and connected to others is the key.

I know it has been dreadfully difficult these last months, and the temptation to just curl up on the sofa or in bed can be overwhelming, but the key is what we CAN do, not what we cannot.

For example, one friend moved the discussion back to "positive" last night by pulling out a deck of "story" cards and to get us talking about not only memories, but also all the things we still wish to do…
And for many years, we gathered weekly in fall and winter to play wallyball, quite a strenuous sport, for 2 hours, then to socialize. Those days are long gone, but my other friend is very clever at organizing silly games that get us laughing, and until Covid we still exercised our competitive genes with monthly card games around someone's dining room table.

NOw I must get out for my (abbreviated) morning walk between thunderstorms.
Sue

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@suz55

Just getting up and moving about helps, feeding my dog, making coffee. Also sitting and doing the yes and no movements with my neck very slowly and reaching up in an apple picking motion. When I first get up, I cannot raise my arms to put eye drops in. I am thankful I loosen up pretty fast.

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Hello @suz55

I've used Tai Chi for arthritis and Parkinson's stiffness. Tai Chi (unlike Yoga) can be done sitting or standing without floor work which is great if you deal with stiffness and pain in your knees, back and hips. The movements used in Tai Chi are very gentle and smooth. One of our members posted a Youtube video which was most helpful to use first thing in the morning. It is only 9 minutes long but helps with the early morning stiffness quite nicely. Here is the link to that video,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZxcNBejxlzs
There is another exercise that is very good for the hands. It was developed for Parkinson's patients, but could probably be used by anyone with hand difficulties. Her is the link to that video,

I look forward to hearing how your appointment goes with a rheumatologist. Will you post again?

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@hopeful3325 I always wanted to do Tai Chi, but will have to wait till my back is healed. I go tomorrow for my first post-op visit. I hope everything is ok.

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@lioness

@sueinmn My O.A
In my hands is getting worse
New pain symptom woke me up during sleep .It never did this before .I have my Meloxicam I take but it didn't keep my pain away last night .

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@lioness Oh darn. That stupid arthritis or it could be something else. You might want to go to the doctor if it is waking you up at night. I am so worry. Take care my friend.

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@lilypaws I found if I put my Amish cream on before bed it keeps it from hurting during night ,have an appt but not till August ug . I will call her and see what she says.

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@lioness

@lilypaws I found if I put my Amish cream on before bed it keeps it from hurting during night ,have an appt but not till August ug . I will call her and see what she says.

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Glad to hear that Amish cream is working for you as I just woke up in pain and had cream and marijuana. Back to sleep! Feel good I feel better.

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@donfeld

Glad to hear that Amish cream is working for you as I just woke up in pain and had cream and marijuana. Back to sleep! Feel good I feel better.

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@donfeld I was surprised how quickly I got relief . I,m ordering another one to have in the other room . Lazy I guess lol

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@hopeful33250

Hello @suz55

I've used Tai Chi for arthritis and Parkinson's stiffness. Tai Chi (unlike Yoga) can be done sitting or standing without floor work which is great if you deal with stiffness and pain in your knees, back and hips. The movements used in Tai Chi are very gentle and smooth. One of our members posted a Youtube video which was most helpful to use first thing in the morning. It is only 9 minutes long but helps with the early morning stiffness quite nicely. Here is the link to that video,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZxcNBejxlzs
There is another exercise that is very good for the hands. It was developed for Parkinson's patients, but could probably be used by anyone with hand difficulties. Her is the link to that video,

I look forward to hearing how your appointment goes with a rheumatologist. Will you post again?

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I will look at your suggestions. Thank you. My PA will need to refer me to a rheumatologist, but she is not in this week. So it may be at least 3-4 weeks before I see anyone. I will let you know how I turn out.

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@hopeful33250

Hello @suz55

I've used Tai Chi for arthritis and Parkinson's stiffness. Tai Chi (unlike Yoga) can be done sitting or standing without floor work which is great if you deal with stiffness and pain in your knees, back and hips. The movements used in Tai Chi are very gentle and smooth. One of our members posted a Youtube video which was most helpful to use first thing in the morning. It is only 9 minutes long but helps with the early morning stiffness quite nicely. Here is the link to that video,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZxcNBejxlzs
There is another exercise that is very good for the hands. It was developed for Parkinson's patients, but could probably be used by anyone with hand difficulties. Her is the link to that video,

I look forward to hearing how your appointment goes with a rheumatologist. Will you post again?

Jump to this post

@hopeful33250 Thanks Teresa just did hand exercise resting now those are tough
Several fingers of both hands hopefully will get better

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@lilypaws

@hopeful3325 I always wanted to do Tai Chi, but will have to wait till my back is healed. I go tomorrow for my first post-op visit. I hope everything is ok.

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@lilypaws .
Please let me know how your first post-op appointment goes. Wishing you all the best!

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