Liner of Hip Replacement

Posted by pinkpam @pinkpam, May 16 12:11pm

Saw Dr. O'driscoll in 2020 said my liner needs replacement. At that time I had other things to worry and no pain. Now my hip is hurting and scary – am I going to dislocate it? How do I know if I'm "ready" for that surgery? anyone here had it done good/bad how did you know you were ready? thanks for your time

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Joint Replacements group.

I am 47 and had total hip replacement 2 months ago…anterior approach and feel great now!!!

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Hi Pam – sorry for the late reply, but life got a little busy for me…

Only your doc can tell you your risk of dislocation from a worn liner, but it does increase with wear and pain is one symptom of excess wear.

Do you know the material in your implant? The procedure is different for metal, ceramic and plastic liners.
Sue

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Just wanted to share a couple things that may help.
Hip revision: How can I get the best recovery?: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/hip-revision-1/

Expectations of Recovery after Revision Surgery: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/expectations-of-recovery-after-revision-surgery/

"A liner, which fits inside the socket. It is most often plastic. Some surgeons are now trying other materials, like ceramic or metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly." Hip joint replacement: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm

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Hello, anyone here that has had Isolated polyethylene exchange to their hip? Mine are 28 yrs old and dr. says I need them. How did you know you were ready for it, how much of a scar and how long of a recoup and was it is successful? Thank you!

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@pinkpam

Hello, anyone here that has had Isolated polyethylene exchange to their hip? Mine are 28 yrs old and dr. says I need them. How did you know you were ready for it, how much of a scar and how long of a recoup and was it is successful? Thank you!

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@pinkpam – I saw your post, and started to think – Hmmm…my second set of hips are now 12 years old, and my doc says he can renew them when the time comes, what's this all about.

Apparently the choices are to replace just the liner, the liner & the ball on the femoral head, or the cup, liner & ball. Each doctor seems to have their own preference, and there is little agreement about which is best. I was unable to find any direct comparison of outcomes for the three kinds of revision. I did find one article that cites a higher likelihood of dislocation after replacement of just the liner (16%) – overall risk of dislocation after any revision is reported to be about 7.5%.

I had full revision surgery on both hips 12 years ago – with the first the recovery time was very comparable to the initial surgery – about 6 weeks to walking, 6 months to full strength. With the second, I dislocated at 1 week (while sitting in a chair) – the doctor went back in and put in a larger ball and all was well. My hips have performed flawlessly for 12 years now.

There are others in this group who have had revisions, I hope they will tell you their experiences.
Did the surgeon discuss all the revision options with you?
Sue

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@pinkpam

Hello, anyone here that has had Isolated polyethylene exchange to their hip? Mine are 28 yrs old and dr. says I need them. How did you know you were ready for it, how much of a scar and how long of a recoup and was it is successful? Thank you!

Jump to this post

I just need new liners – Hope others will chime in with their experiences and answer my questions. P

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@pinkpam

I just need new liners – Hope others will chime in with their experiences and answer my questions. P

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I'm curious, how long do the polyethylene liners last? This is what is used to replace the meniscus in a TKR, and it seems to me the plastic will wear out while the metal won't. So if a revision is necessary, why not just replace the plastic. Sorry, I'm mixing up hips and knees here, but the issue is, I think, the same. I had both knees replaced this year.

FWIW I'm still amazed they can engineer plastic to last for ten plus years, hips and knees. Apparently they irradiate the polyethylene in production and that is what makes it last. Makes no sense to me, but I'm glad it works!

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