They found a mass: How do you cope with anxiety and all the tests etc?

Posted by loula @loula, Feb 3 11:06am

I was told last Wednesday I have a mass on right lung, going to doctor today for consult and I can not stop shaking what can you do for the anxiety level with this. not sure what a consult is or what is next all I can think of is this the last day of my normal life.

@loula– Good afternoon and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I know just how you feel! Unfortunately, until you have an idea of what your next steps are things will seem very confusing and scary. For right now use whatever resources that you have used during very tense times in the past: breathing exercises, walks, exercise, books, movies even medicines.

A consult is an appointment, usually with a specialist, like a pulmonologist, to see what the steps will be next. It will tell you what tests you will need and what you can expect in the near future. You might be confused about the terminology that is associated with lung cancer. Don't let that scare you right now. If you don't know a term make sure to ask the specialist to write it down for you. AND, take one step at a time, one breath at a time.

I know this is a kick in the stomach and I do want to reassure you that the fear will lessen as you go through your journey. I will be right here for you to walk with you if that will make you feel better.

What brought you to get a picture of your chest?

Merry

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@merpreb

@loula– Good afternoon and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I know just how you feel! Unfortunately, until you have an idea of what your next steps are things will seem very confusing and scary. For right now use whatever resources that you have used during very tense times in the past: breathing exercises, walks, exercise, books, movies even medicines.

A consult is an appointment, usually with a specialist, like a pulmonologist, to see what the steps will be next. It will tell you what tests you will need and what you can expect in the near future. You might be confused about the terminology that is associated with lung cancer. Don't let that scare you right now. If you don't know a term make sure to ask the specialist to write it down for you. AND, take one step at a time, one breath at a time.

I know this is a kick in the stomach and I do want to reassure you that the fear will lessen as you go through your journey. I will be right here for you to walk with you if that will make you feel better.

What brought you to get a picture of your chest?

Merry

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@loula–I woke up wondering how you did at your appointment yesterday. How are you?

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Loula.. Your not alone Dear and your feelings are perfectly normal. There are others hear that know exactly how you feel. We’re hear for you. Without knowing the results of your consult, when first told I had stage IV NSCLC, a tumor in my head, cancer in the lymph nodes, tumors on my spine and ribs with a prognosis of 6 months to a year if I was lucky, I felt the same way you did, my wife broke down. My next reaction was anger, “who do you think your talking too, I’m not accepting that” !!! That was 19 months ago, I’m still kicking, and my last PET scan in Oct. 2020 showed I was cancer free. My oncologist calls me a miracle. Chemo was literally killing me and I refused any more after the 3rd round. I have been on straight Keytruda, no cocktail, 200mg every 21 days, since Aug, with no side effects. There are frequent new advances in treatment any many survivors out here. I know it’s hard, but keep a positive attitude Loula and never give up. How are you doing today?

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Loula, I have to echo others thoughts. The diagnosis is overwhelming! Try going for a walk, or find a good movie to watch to try to take your mind off things if even just for a short while. Almost a year ago I was diagnosed with NSCLC stage IV, I felt terrible and was progressing down hill fast. Now with an amazing targeted therapy (pills), I’m hiking and biking and feel great. There are real advancements in treating this horrible disease. I would suggest biomarker testing, which helps to determine the driving force of the cancer. Best of luck to you in the coming days, keep in touch, Lisa

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thank you for the information every little bit helps, one of my friends husband also had cancer and they used pellets to treat him she said she had never heard of that until they used it him. there is so much to read and learn, it is nice to hear that you are back to some kind of life again.

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@loula

thank you for the information every little bit helps, one of my friends husband also had cancer and they used pellets to treat him she said she had never heard of that until they used it him. there is so much to read and learn, it is nice to hear that you are back to some kind of life again.

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@loula– How was your appointment and what is the next step for you?

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@loula, Dear Loula, How are you doing today? Did you have your appointment with your doctor?
My heart goes out to you. So many of us have gotten similar news and our minds go into panic mode. The anxiety is perfectly normal. It helps once we get a diagnosis and a plan. Together, with your medical team, they’ll help you along this new journey. Our bodies have amazing abilities to heal and recover. Keeping a positive outlook is a strong key to success. You’ve got this!!
It’s wonderful that you joined Mayo Connect! This community is here to offer hope and fosters a safe environment for support along your journey. Wishing you all the best, Lori.

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@loula

thank you for the information every little bit helps, one of my friends husband also had cancer and they used pellets to treat him she said she had never heard of that until they used it him. there is so much to read and learn, it is nice to hear that you are back to some kind of life again.

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@loula, If you need another feel good moment to help boost your outlook…
One of my closest friends was diagnosed 7 years ago with kidney cancer. (Age 61 at the time) It had spread to her lungs and brain. She was told to ‘get her affairs in order.” Not being one to take NO for an answer, she had a second opinion. Kidney removed, lung cancer treated with targeted drugs, and brain lesions were addressed. Now at 68, she is 6 years in complete remission! I ran into her yesterday out on the lake, x-skiing!! She bikes in marathons, kayaks, skis, swims. She’s the poster child for hope!

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@loribmt

@loula, If you need another feel good moment to help boost your outlook…
One of my closest friends was diagnosed 7 years ago with kidney cancer. (Age 61 at the time) It had spread to her lungs and brain. She was told to ‘get her affairs in order.” Not being one to take NO for an answer, she had a second opinion. Kidney removed, lung cancer treated with targeted drugs, and brain lesions were addressed. Now at 68, she is 6 years in complete remission! I ran into her yesterday out on the lake, x-skiing!! She bikes in marathons, kayaks, skis, swims. She’s the poster child for hope!

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Thank you!

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Tomorrow morning is the big day for the bronchoscopy, panic mode is set high and I feel like I am on fire temp 99.3 so I know it has to be nerves. everything starts going through your head about chemo radiation, then next week Thursday I have a follow up with doctor for results. stay with me folks I know you all have same thoughts. I am greatful for my sister she has been a life saver. had a covid test yesterday so all good on that end. thanks to all for all your advise.

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@loula

Tomorrow morning is the big day for the bronchoscopy, panic mode is set high and I feel like I am on fire temp 99.3 so I know it has to be nerves. everything starts going through your head about chemo radiation, then next week Thursday I have a follow up with doctor for results. stay with me folks I know you all have same thoughts. I am greatful for my sister she has been a life saver. had a covid test yesterday so all good on that end. thanks to all for all your advise.

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@loula. Best of luck to you, my dear. You know we’re all there with you in spirt and wishing you well. I’ve not had the procedure you’re having but I sure know the feeling of “anxiety level in the red zone”! It’s a relief to have your sister, ‘Team Loula” right with you! Air hugs!! You’ve got this!

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@loula

Tomorrow morning is the big day for the bronchoscopy, panic mode is set high and I feel like I am on fire temp 99.3 so I know it has to be nerves. everything starts going through your head about chemo radiation, then next week Thursday I have a follow up with doctor for results. stay with me folks I know you all have same thoughts. I am greatful for my sister she has been a life saver. had a covid test yesterday so all good on that end. thanks to all for all your advise.

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@loula– I know the feeling! Having a bronchoscopy used to be my worst nightmare. But my GI guy put me out! I wasn't so afraid of what he would find (damage from my chemo?) as I was to the procedure. I hope that you can request to be put out. Even so, the technicians usually do the best because they do these so often.

I'm also glad that you have your sister with you. Please let us know how it goes.

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Hi @loula, I'd like to add my welcome. Finding out that something isn't right, like finding a mass on the lung, is a really scary and anxiety-ridden time. As you see, you have many members here on Mayo Clinic Connect who will journey alongside you, listen to you, and, where appropriate, share tips and experiences to support you.

I hope you don't mind, but I changed the title of this discussion group to "They found a mass: How do you cope with anxiety and all the tests etc?" Believe it or not, this discussion will help many others too.

I know you're anxiety is running in over-drive right now. Who's wouldn't? Please try to take things one day at a time, even one hour at a time. Don't think about what the future may or may not hold. Today's focus is to do everything in your control today to help yourself for tomorrow. Is the weather nice enough to go out for a walk? What can you do to help you sleep well tonight to help you face tomorrow? Perhaps no frantic Google searches or no screen time in the evening, a nice warm bath if you like baths, meditation. What things work for you?

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@colleenyoung

Hi @loula, I'd like to add my welcome. Finding out that something isn't right, like finding a mass on the lung, is a really scary and anxiety-ridden time. As you see, you have many members here on Mayo Clinic Connect who will journey alongside you, listen to you, and, where appropriate, share tips and experiences to support you.

I hope you don't mind, but I changed the title of this discussion group to "They found a mass: How do you cope with anxiety and all the tests etc?" Believe it or not, this discussion will help many others too.

I know you're anxiety is running in over-drive right now. Who's wouldn't? Please try to take things one day at a time, even one hour at a time. Don't think about what the future may or may not hold. Today's focus is to do everything in your control today to help yourself for tomorrow. Is the weather nice enough to go out for a walk? What can you do to help you sleep well tonight to help you face tomorrow? Perhaps no frantic Google searches or no screen time in the evening, a nice warm bath if you like baths, meditation. What things work for you?

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I am so thankful to have found this site, thanks for being there.
________________________________

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Breathe, breathe, breathe. I remember the fear when first receiving my diagnosis. When you have your consult, have someone with you. They will remember things that you will not. Take a deep breath whenever you he anxiety builds and take one day at a time. I will think a cancer diagnosis awakens a person to so many other things.

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