is the pain from hip or back?

Posted by braves11 @braves11, Apr 19, 2017

Mom is 92. One kidney. 5 ft tall..113 lbs. uses walker. She has had this pain for 5 weeks. She has pain in low lumbar, into hip, down side of leg only to knee , and lifting her leg causes hip and groin pain. Coughing causes groin pain almost down to vaginal area. Not much pain at all when walking or standing. When she is in the act of sitting down, or can’t find a comfortable position to stay seated, it’s severe, but once she “gets over that spot”, it’s mild. This is not a result of falling. The act of standing up from being seated is painful. MRI of hip is normal…. MRI of lumbar shows lots of degeneration , loss of disc space, etc but nothing jumps out as a cause like herniation . CT of lumbar is ok. Had epidural of L 4-5 … no help. Bursa injection.. no help. Now they want to do a bone scan AND bone density test.
1. Does this sound like hip or back. We have differing opinions. One ortho says back … another says hip… therefore bone scan. But mom is concerned about taking it due to one kidney and creatinine range of 1.3 up to 1.7. ( the contrast)
2. One says rest it… the other says PT.
3. Should we push for another epidural at L 3-4???
4. They want her to take gabapentin but drowsiness is issue , esp with walker etc. Takes Ultracet.
We are at a road block not knowing what to do

I have same. Take garapentine at night before going to sleep. It helps. Also, we have no alternative but to have more epidural shots. They help for a while. Pain gels and heat helps also

REPLY
@steeldove

Some interesting thoughts about pain:
Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints
By Kelly Lindamood

Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints

When it comes to lower back pain, the struggle is real. For more than 10 years, I’ve worked hard to find natural and noninvasive solutions that allow me to reduce discomfort while maintaining an active lifestyle. I’ve seen benefits from physical therapy, acupuncture, yoga, and, most recently, changing my diet. You might be thinking, “What can diet possibly have to do with back pain?” As it turns out, quite a bit.

The Arthritis-Gut Health Connection

Back pain and other aching joints can often be a result of arthritis, one of many autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid and psoriatic are two types of arthritis). Autoimmune diseases occur when our immune system mistakenly attacks our own internal tissues and organs. Conditions range from type 1 diabetes to thyroid disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, and psoriasis. It’s estimated that 23.5 million Americans suffer from some type of autoimmune condition. In my case, the aching back was due to arthritis, and I quickly learned that I could control it through — of all things — my gut!

Why Gut Health Is a Promising Frontier For Aching Joints

In recent years, doctors have identified the gut as a major contributor to a wide range of bodily functions. As a result, some of the most exciting and promising advances in personal health are happening in the gut. Trillions of microorganisms live in and on our bodies; these microorganisms comprise our microbiome, the majority of which is found in our gut. This living and active microbiome has been shown to play a role in cognitive processes, emotional health, obesity, and in fighting off disease and sickness — and more. In fact, the list is so long that our microbiome has been referred to as our second genome. And study after study has shown that this community of microorganisms can play a role in relieving autoimmune conditions.

When I first happened upon this information, I was thrilled for two reasons: One, tending to our microbiome is a noninvasive, natural approach to managing aches and pains — especially my back pain. And two, it’s empowering to know there are personal actions we can take to help find relief for autoimmune conditions.

For me, this was like finding that one missing puzzle piece. I had speculated that certain foods would irritate my aching back and cause it to feel more inflamed. Now, it makes sense.

So today when I eat in a way that agrees with my digestion (a.k.a. my microbiome), my back pain is reduced, and on most days even nonexistent. I avoid foods like gluten and sugar that seem to trigger inflammation, and I’ve added things like sauerkraut to my diet that cultivate my microbiome. I’ve taken control of this aching back, and it’s an amazing feeling!

5 Ways to Cultivate Your Microbiome

You can do this, too! While we have a lot more to learn, there’s growing consensus on what constitutes a healthy microbiome and how it affects every part of our body. Try this checklist as a starting point for better health:

Eat your veggies! We’ve all heard that we need to eat more veggies, and now there’s yet another reason: Our garden of microbes loves to feed on these fiber-rich foods. Make sure that every meal includes at least one to two servings of vegetables. Looking for a snack? Reach for those celery and carrot sticks.
Go easy on the antibiotics if you can. It’s not hard to come by a prescription for antibiotics. If you have a sniffle or a sore throat, take antibiotics only when absolutely necessary. Studies have shown they may be detrimental to the microbiome.
Avoid foods that cause bloating and gas pain. Pay attention to what foods cause you digestive stress. Loose bowels, gas, and bloating can be indicators that a certain food doesn’t agree with you (and your microbiome). Common triggers can be dairy products, grains, and legumes. You can test these out by eliminating a particular food for seven days. After seven days, reintroduce the food and pay attention to whether you experience any discomfort. If you do, work to eliminate these foods from your diet.
Choose whole foods over processed. Artificial preservatives used in many processed foods have been shown to adversely affect gut bacteria. These preservatives are often found in foods like ice cream, peanut butter, and salad dressings. Go for whole foods or lightly processed foods that have recognizable ingredients.
Show some love for fermented foods. When it comes to our gut bacteria, diversity is key. Add in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, kefir, and kimchi to enrich your garden. When buying off-the-shelf products, make sure they are unpasteurized so that the bacteria are preserved.
Cultivating your microbiome can be as much fun as tending to an abundant summer garden. Practice these tips and see what works for you; relief from nagging aches and pains can be right around the corner!

Be Well,

Kelly Lindamood for the Remedy Chicks

Illustrations: iStock.com

Last Updated: 8/2/2016

Jump to this post

@steeldove,

If you don’t mind would you like to share some more about yourself? Have you tried some of the pointers in this blog post? What sort of chronic pain do you have and how have you found ways to fight it? I am sure the members would love to learn a bit more about yourself and how you cope with your pain?

REPLY
@steeldove

Some interesting thoughts about pain:
Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints
By Kelly Lindamood

Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints

When it comes to lower back pain, the struggle is real. For more than 10 years, I’ve worked hard to find natural and noninvasive solutions that allow me to reduce discomfort while maintaining an active lifestyle. I’ve seen benefits from physical therapy, acupuncture, yoga, and, most recently, changing my diet. You might be thinking, “What can diet possibly have to do with back pain?” As it turns out, quite a bit.

The Arthritis-Gut Health Connection

Back pain and other aching joints can often be a result of arthritis, one of many autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid and psoriatic are two types of arthritis). Autoimmune diseases occur when our immune system mistakenly attacks our own internal tissues and organs. Conditions range from type 1 diabetes to thyroid disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, and psoriasis. It’s estimated that 23.5 million Americans suffer from some type of autoimmune condition. In my case, the aching back was due to arthritis, and I quickly learned that I could control it through — of all things — my gut!

Why Gut Health Is a Promising Frontier For Aching Joints

In recent years, doctors have identified the gut as a major contributor to a wide range of bodily functions. As a result, some of the most exciting and promising advances in personal health are happening in the gut. Trillions of microorganisms live in and on our bodies; these microorganisms comprise our microbiome, the majority of which is found in our gut. This living and active microbiome has been shown to play a role in cognitive processes, emotional health, obesity, and in fighting off disease and sickness — and more. In fact, the list is so long that our microbiome has been referred to as our second genome. And study after study has shown that this community of microorganisms can play a role in relieving autoimmune conditions.

When I first happened upon this information, I was thrilled for two reasons: One, tending to our microbiome is a noninvasive, natural approach to managing aches and pains — especially my back pain. And two, it’s empowering to know there are personal actions we can take to help find relief for autoimmune conditions.

For me, this was like finding that one missing puzzle piece. I had speculated that certain foods would irritate my aching back and cause it to feel more inflamed. Now, it makes sense.

So today when I eat in a way that agrees with my digestion (a.k.a. my microbiome), my back pain is reduced, and on most days even nonexistent. I avoid foods like gluten and sugar that seem to trigger inflammation, and I’ve added things like sauerkraut to my diet that cultivate my microbiome. I’ve taken control of this aching back, and it’s an amazing feeling!

5 Ways to Cultivate Your Microbiome

You can do this, too! While we have a lot more to learn, there’s growing consensus on what constitutes a healthy microbiome and how it affects every part of our body. Try this checklist as a starting point for better health:

Eat your veggies! We’ve all heard that we need to eat more veggies, and now there’s yet another reason: Our garden of microbes loves to feed on these fiber-rich foods. Make sure that every meal includes at least one to two servings of vegetables. Looking for a snack? Reach for those celery and carrot sticks.
Go easy on the antibiotics if you can. It’s not hard to come by a prescription for antibiotics. If you have a sniffle or a sore throat, take antibiotics only when absolutely necessary. Studies have shown they may be detrimental to the microbiome.
Avoid foods that cause bloating and gas pain. Pay attention to what foods cause you digestive stress. Loose bowels, gas, and bloating can be indicators that a certain food doesn’t agree with you (and your microbiome). Common triggers can be dairy products, grains, and legumes. You can test these out by eliminating a particular food for seven days. After seven days, reintroduce the food and pay attention to whether you experience any discomfort. If you do, work to eliminate these foods from your diet.
Choose whole foods over processed. Artificial preservatives used in many processed foods have been shown to adversely affect gut bacteria. These preservatives are often found in foods like ice cream, peanut butter, and salad dressings. Go for whole foods or lightly processed foods that have recognizable ingredients.
Show some love for fermented foods. When it comes to our gut bacteria, diversity is key. Add in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, kefir, and kimchi to enrich your garden. When buying off-the-shelf products, make sure they are unpasteurized so that the bacteria are preserved.
Cultivating your microbiome can be as much fun as tending to an abundant summer garden. Practice these tips and see what works for you; relief from nagging aches and pains can be right around the corner!

Be Well,

Kelly Lindamood for the Remedy Chicks

Illustrations: iStock.com

Last Updated: 8/2/2016

Jump to this post

I’ve had a few nites of nitemares cause I can’t get my Dr. to respond re my inquires about getting PRP and stem cells in Reno, NV. So very discouraged.
Wear a brace to open up “bone on bone” to accept cells into knee.Pain is distracting me from focusing and especially while in bed at nite – pain wakes me.

REPLY

I took my husband to dr about hip and leg pain. X-ray revealed a thining of his right hip – therefore, an MRI scheduled to prepare for hip replacement.
Ask her doctor to verify

REPLY
@steeldove

Some interesting thoughts about pain:
Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints
By Kelly Lindamood

Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints

When it comes to lower back pain, the struggle is real. For more than 10 years, I’ve worked hard to find natural and noninvasive solutions that allow me to reduce discomfort while maintaining an active lifestyle. I’ve seen benefits from physical therapy, acupuncture, yoga, and, most recently, changing my diet. You might be thinking, “What can diet possibly have to do with back pain?” As it turns out, quite a bit.

The Arthritis-Gut Health Connection

Back pain and other aching joints can often be a result of arthritis, one of many autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid and psoriatic are two types of arthritis). Autoimmune diseases occur when our immune system mistakenly attacks our own internal tissues and organs. Conditions range from type 1 diabetes to thyroid disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, and psoriasis. It’s estimated that 23.5 million Americans suffer from some type of autoimmune condition. In my case, the aching back was due to arthritis, and I quickly learned that I could control it through — of all things — my gut!

Why Gut Health Is a Promising Frontier For Aching Joints

In recent years, doctors have identified the gut as a major contributor to a wide range of bodily functions. As a result, some of the most exciting and promising advances in personal health are happening in the gut. Trillions of microorganisms live in and on our bodies; these microorganisms comprise our microbiome, the majority of which is found in our gut. This living and active microbiome has been shown to play a role in cognitive processes, emotional health, obesity, and in fighting off disease and sickness — and more. In fact, the list is so long that our microbiome has been referred to as our second genome. And study after study has shown that this community of microorganisms can play a role in relieving autoimmune conditions.

When I first happened upon this information, I was thrilled for two reasons: One, tending to our microbiome is a noninvasive, natural approach to managing aches and pains — especially my back pain. And two, it’s empowering to know there are personal actions we can take to help find relief for autoimmune conditions.

For me, this was like finding that one missing puzzle piece. I had speculated that certain foods would irritate my aching back and cause it to feel more inflamed. Now, it makes sense.

So today when I eat in a way that agrees with my digestion (a.k.a. my microbiome), my back pain is reduced, and on most days even nonexistent. I avoid foods like gluten and sugar that seem to trigger inflammation, and I’ve added things like sauerkraut to my diet that cultivate my microbiome. I’ve taken control of this aching back, and it’s an amazing feeling!

5 Ways to Cultivate Your Microbiome

You can do this, too! While we have a lot more to learn, there’s growing consensus on what constitutes a healthy microbiome and how it affects every part of our body. Try this checklist as a starting point for better health:

Eat your veggies! We’ve all heard that we need to eat more veggies, and now there’s yet another reason: Our garden of microbes loves to feed on these fiber-rich foods. Make sure that every meal includes at least one to two servings of vegetables. Looking for a snack? Reach for those celery and carrot sticks.
Go easy on the antibiotics if you can. It’s not hard to come by a prescription for antibiotics. If you have a sniffle or a sore throat, take antibiotics only when absolutely necessary. Studies have shown they may be detrimental to the microbiome.
Avoid foods that cause bloating and gas pain. Pay attention to what foods cause you digestive stress. Loose bowels, gas, and bloating can be indicators that a certain food doesn’t agree with you (and your microbiome). Common triggers can be dairy products, grains, and legumes. You can test these out by eliminating a particular food for seven days. After seven days, reintroduce the food and pay attention to whether you experience any discomfort. If you do, work to eliminate these foods from your diet.
Choose whole foods over processed. Artificial preservatives used in many processed foods have been shown to adversely affect gut bacteria. These preservatives are often found in foods like ice cream, peanut butter, and salad dressings. Go for whole foods or lightly processed foods that have recognizable ingredients.
Show some love for fermented foods. When it comes to our gut bacteria, diversity is key. Add in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, kefir, and kimchi to enrich your garden. When buying off-the-shelf products, make sure they are unpasteurized so that the bacteria are preserved.
Cultivating your microbiome can be as much fun as tending to an abundant summer garden. Practice these tips and see what works for you; relief from nagging aches and pains can be right around the corner!

Be Well,

Kelly Lindamood for the Remedy Chicks

Illustrations: iStock.com

Last Updated: 8/2/2016

Jump to this post

Mom is 93 now. She has one kidney so can’t take nsaids like Advil etc. Takes Tylenol 600 mg arthritis strength 2 times a day.?Helps a little. She doesn’t like to take the tramadol prescribed.She uses a walker all the time. We found a pain mgt specialist who gave her steroid shots ( not epidural) on hip and back and groin area where the pain was. It has helped for 2 weeks!! Great results. Pain doc says call and she can repeat if needed or go to epidural. She’s sleeping better! Uses Biofreeze and that helps. Uses Aspercreme some. Considering PT but just wants to enjoy the no pain time right now!

REPLY
@steeldove

Some interesting thoughts about pain:
Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints
By Kelly Lindamood

Trust Your Gut: 5 Ways to Relieve Aching Joints

When it comes to lower back pain, the struggle is real. For more than 10 years, I’ve worked hard to find natural and noninvasive solutions that allow me to reduce discomfort while maintaining an active lifestyle. I’ve seen benefits from physical therapy, acupuncture, yoga, and, most recently, changing my diet. You might be thinking, “What can diet possibly have to do with back pain?” As it turns out, quite a bit.

The Arthritis-Gut Health Connection

Back pain and other aching joints can often be a result of arthritis, one of many autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid and psoriatic are two types of arthritis). Autoimmune diseases occur when our immune system mistakenly attacks our own internal tissues and organs. Conditions range from type 1 diabetes to thyroid disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, and psoriasis. It’s estimated that 23.5 million Americans suffer from some type of autoimmune condition. In my case, the aching back was due to arthritis, and I quickly learned that I could control it through — of all things — my gut!

Why Gut Health Is a Promising Frontier For Aching Joints

In recent years, doctors have identified the gut as a major contributor to a wide range of bodily functions. As a result, some of the most exciting and promising advances in personal health are happening in the gut. Trillions of microorganisms live in and on our bodies; these microorganisms comprise our microbiome, the majority of which is found in our gut. This living and active microbiome has been shown to play a role in cognitive processes, emotional health, obesity, and in fighting off disease and sickness — and more. In fact, the list is so long that our microbiome has been referred to as our second genome. And study after study has shown that this community of microorganisms can play a role in relieving autoimmune conditions.

When I first happened upon this information, I was thrilled for two reasons: One, tending to our microbiome is a noninvasive, natural approach to managing aches and pains — especially my back pain. And two, it’s empowering to know there are personal actions we can take to help find relief for autoimmune conditions.

For me, this was like finding that one missing puzzle piece. I had speculated that certain foods would irritate my aching back and cause it to feel more inflamed. Now, it makes sense.

So today when I eat in a way that agrees with my digestion (a.k.a. my microbiome), my back pain is reduced, and on most days even nonexistent. I avoid foods like gluten and sugar that seem to trigger inflammation, and I’ve added things like sauerkraut to my diet that cultivate my microbiome. I’ve taken control of this aching back, and it’s an amazing feeling!

5 Ways to Cultivate Your Microbiome

You can do this, too! While we have a lot more to learn, there’s growing consensus on what constitutes a healthy microbiome and how it affects every part of our body. Try this checklist as a starting point for better health:

Eat your veggies! We’ve all heard that we need to eat more veggies, and now there’s yet another reason: Our garden of microbes loves to feed on these fiber-rich foods. Make sure that every meal includes at least one to two servings of vegetables. Looking for a snack? Reach for those celery and carrot sticks.
Go easy on the antibiotics if you can. It’s not hard to come by a prescription for antibiotics. If you have a sniffle or a sore throat, take antibiotics only when absolutely necessary. Studies have shown they may be detrimental to the microbiome.
Avoid foods that cause bloating and gas pain. Pay attention to what foods cause you digestive stress. Loose bowels, gas, and bloating can be indicators that a certain food doesn’t agree with you (and your microbiome). Common triggers can be dairy products, grains, and legumes. You can test these out by eliminating a particular food for seven days. After seven days, reintroduce the food and pay attention to whether you experience any discomfort. If you do, work to eliminate these foods from your diet.
Choose whole foods over processed. Artificial preservatives used in many processed foods have been shown to adversely affect gut bacteria. These preservatives are often found in foods like ice cream, peanut butter, and salad dressings. Go for whole foods or lightly processed foods that have recognizable ingredients.
Show some love for fermented foods. When it comes to our gut bacteria, diversity is key. Add in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, kefir, and kimchi to enrich your garden. When buying off-the-shelf products, make sure they are unpasteurized so that the bacteria are preserved.
Cultivating your microbiome can be as much fun as tending to an abundant summer garden. Practice these tips and see what works for you; relief from nagging aches and pains can be right around the corner!

Be Well,

Kelly Lindamood for the Remedy Chicks

Illustrations: iStock.com

Last Updated: 8/2/2016

Jump to this post

Entire spine is very arthritic. Degenerative discs caused scoliosis and now kyphosis. Two total shoulder replacements. Small fiber polyneuropathy. Tramadol when pain has me in tears. Gabapentin, which I want to discontinue as I find the side effects intolerable and I’m not convinced that it does much for my pain from SFP. Best ongoing “treatment” for me is 3 times a week doing a 60+ minute deep-water workout in the pool followed by soaking in the hot tub. Plan to get back to a regular yoga practice after a 3-year hiatus.

REPLY

@braves11 This may seem out in left field but you might want to look into neural and/or visceral manipulation (see the Barral Institute) or Class IV lasers. I’ve had sessions of both that each relieved pain in the sections of the same areas you mention.

REPLY

Hoping this will be helpful to all of you (recognizing not everybody had/has my problem). I had lower back, hip, and leg pain for weeks, and after an MRI, surgeons and pain specialists counseled me to 1) fix my lumbar spine and 2) take regular pain shots. Meantime, I should do physical therapy (presumably to see whether my problem was caused by something they didn’t see). IT WAS! Rejecting the shots at first, I asked my primary care physician for her thoughts, and she advised considering SACROILITIS — inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints — situated where your lower spine and pelvis connect.

She said Sacroilitis is usually overlooked by spine specialists, partly because it’s very difficult to diagnose. It also doesn’t bring in a lot of revenue, because the diagnosis is simple: Injection of an anti-inflammatory medication in the suspected sacroiliac joint. If Sacroilitis is the cause of the pain, anti-inflammatories are the answer — the diagnosis confirmation is the cure. Worked for me. Turned out my inflammation was in only one of my sacroiliac joints, so two injections directly into that joint fixed my problem. It’s been almost three years since the pain disappeared.

Raise that possibility with your spine specialist or with another one giving you a second opinion. For more information, check out this web page —
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sacroiliitis/home/ovc-20166357.
Martin

REPLY

I believe you! I’m going to ask my doctor about this. I’ve tried all and nothing has helped. I feel what you say is absolutely correct

REPLY

@braves11 I am sad that your mother is in so much pain. Hard to know what to do to help. You mentioned Gabapentin. Wanting to let you know that if taken at bedtime it may help w/ sleep. Only mentioning my experience w/ this med as I had rare, severe side effects w/ it. Key word is “rare”. If she does start taking it be sure to notice any changes in her mood or behavior. Not at all wanting to scare you as this med helps many.

REPLY
@predictable

Hoping this will be helpful to all of you (recognizing not everybody had/has my problem). I had lower back, hip, and leg pain for weeks, and after an MRI, surgeons and pain specialists counseled me to 1) fix my lumbar spine and 2) take regular pain shots. Meantime, I should do physical therapy (presumably to see whether my problem was caused by something they didn’t see). IT WAS! Rejecting the shots at first, I asked my primary care physician for her thoughts, and she advised considering SACROILITIS — inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints — situated where your lower spine and pelvis connect.

She said Sacroilitis is usually overlooked by spine specialists, partly because it’s very difficult to diagnose. It also doesn’t bring in a lot of revenue, because the diagnosis is simple: Injection of an anti-inflammatory medication in the suspected sacroiliac joint. If Sacroilitis is the cause of the pain, anti-inflammatories are the answer — the diagnosis confirmation is the cure. Worked for me. Turned out my inflammation was in only one of my sacroiliac joints, so two injections directly into that joint fixed my problem. It’s been almost three years since the pain disappeared.

Raise that possibility with your spine specialist or with another one giving you a second opinion. For more information, check out this web page —
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sacroiliitis/home/ovc-20166357.
Martin

Jump to this post

Glad that you found relief from the injections. They didn’t work for me and I had to have radiofrequency neuroablation. Unfortunately, that nerve does grow back, and I’m trying to schedule another neuroablation.

REPLY
@predictable

Hoping this will be helpful to all of you (recognizing not everybody had/has my problem). I had lower back, hip, and leg pain for weeks, and after an MRI, surgeons and pain specialists counseled me to 1) fix my lumbar spine and 2) take regular pain shots. Meantime, I should do physical therapy (presumably to see whether my problem was caused by something they didn’t see). IT WAS! Rejecting the shots at first, I asked my primary care physician for her thoughts, and she advised considering SACROILITIS — inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints — situated where your lower spine and pelvis connect.

She said Sacroilitis is usually overlooked by spine specialists, partly because it’s very difficult to diagnose. It also doesn’t bring in a lot of revenue, because the diagnosis is simple: Injection of an anti-inflammatory medication in the suspected sacroiliac joint. If Sacroilitis is the cause of the pain, anti-inflammatories are the answer — the diagnosis confirmation is the cure. Worked for me. Turned out my inflammation was in only one of my sacroiliac joints, so two injections directly into that joint fixed my problem. It’s been almost three years since the pain disappeared.

Raise that possibility with your spine specialist or with another one giving you a second opinion. For more information, check out this web page —
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sacroiliitis/home/ovc-20166357.
Martin

Jump to this post

If you’re addressing me, @steeldove, permit me to clarify that there was no nerve involved in my sacroilitis, just inflammation in the sacroiliac joint. The inflammation had been exacerbated by a physical therapist who followed standard practice based on assumptions about the origin of lower back pain — he thought it related to nerves from the spinal cord being pinched by vertebrae. So he tied me to a motor-driven table and pulled my pelvis away from my shoulders to open the space between my vertebrae. Bad choice before my diagnosis was confirmed. So if the pain comes back, my FIRST choice will be to check out the sacroiliac joint before I let anybody mess with my spine. Martin

REPLY
@predictable

Hoping this will be helpful to all of you (recognizing not everybody had/has my problem). I had lower back, hip, and leg pain for weeks, and after an MRI, surgeons and pain specialists counseled me to 1) fix my lumbar spine and 2) take regular pain shots. Meantime, I should do physical therapy (presumably to see whether my problem was caused by something they didn’t see). IT WAS! Rejecting the shots at first, I asked my primary care physician for her thoughts, and she advised considering SACROILITIS — inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints — situated where your lower spine and pelvis connect.

She said Sacroilitis is usually overlooked by spine specialists, partly because it’s very difficult to diagnose. It also doesn’t bring in a lot of revenue, because the diagnosis is simple: Injection of an anti-inflammatory medication in the suspected sacroiliac joint. If Sacroilitis is the cause of the pain, anti-inflammatories are the answer — the diagnosis confirmation is the cure. Worked for me. Turned out my inflammation was in only one of my sacroiliac joints, so two injections directly into that joint fixed my problem. It’s been almost three years since the pain disappeared.

Raise that possibility with your spine specialist or with another one giving you a second opinion. For more information, check out this web page —
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sacroiliitis/home/ovc-20166357.
Martin

Jump to this post

Thank you very much Martin
Grace

REPLY
@predictable

Hoping this will be helpful to all of you (recognizing not everybody had/has my problem). I had lower back, hip, and leg pain for weeks, and after an MRI, surgeons and pain specialists counseled me to 1) fix my lumbar spine and 2) take regular pain shots. Meantime, I should do physical therapy (presumably to see whether my problem was caused by something they didn’t see). IT WAS! Rejecting the shots at first, I asked my primary care physician for her thoughts, and she advised considering SACROILITIS — inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints — situated where your lower spine and pelvis connect.

She said Sacroilitis is usually overlooked by spine specialists, partly because it’s very difficult to diagnose. It also doesn’t bring in a lot of revenue, because the diagnosis is simple: Injection of an anti-inflammatory medication in the suspected sacroiliac joint. If Sacroilitis is the cause of the pain, anti-inflammatories are the answer — the diagnosis confirmation is the cure. Worked for me. Turned out my inflammation was in only one of my sacroiliac joints, so two injections directly into that joint fixed my problem. It’s been almost three years since the pain disappeared.

Raise that possibility with your spine specialist or with another one giving you a second opinion. For more information, check out this web page —
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sacroiliitis/home/ovc-20166357.
Martin

Jump to this post

Thank you for your comments. I hope you do better. Grace

REPLY
@predictable

Hoping this will be helpful to all of you (recognizing not everybody had/has my problem). I had lower back, hip, and leg pain for weeks, and after an MRI, surgeons and pain specialists counseled me to 1) fix my lumbar spine and 2) take regular pain shots. Meantime, I should do physical therapy (presumably to see whether my problem was caused by something they didn’t see). IT WAS! Rejecting the shots at first, I asked my primary care physician for her thoughts, and she advised considering SACROILITIS — inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints — situated where your lower spine and pelvis connect.

She said Sacroilitis is usually overlooked by spine specialists, partly because it’s very difficult to diagnose. It also doesn’t bring in a lot of revenue, because the diagnosis is simple: Injection of an anti-inflammatory medication in the suspected sacroiliac joint. If Sacroilitis is the cause of the pain, anti-inflammatories are the answer — the diagnosis confirmation is the cure. Worked for me. Turned out my inflammation was in only one of my sacroiliac joints, so two injections directly into that joint fixed my problem. It’s been almost three years since the pain disappeared.

Raise that possibility with your spine specialist or with another one giving you a second opinion. For more information, check out this web page —
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sacroiliitis/home/ovc-20166357.
Martin

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The nerve that was zapped out was that which carried the pain messages from my SI joint to the brain.
Where was that physical therapist? I want to be sure to stay far away from him/her!!!!

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