Ileocolic Resection Surgery

Posted by lovablesteven @lovablesteven, Mar 22, 2019

Recently I was told I needed to have this surgery and am terrified about it. Would love to hear some personal experiences from people who have had this surgery and how the recovery process was along with how they are doing now…thank you for your replies!

@hopeful33250

That sounds very good, @lovablesteven! I'm glad that you found out about her experience.

If it were me, I would feel more confident knowing about that.

Jump to this post

Thank you yah I'm feeling a little less anxious day by day but I have my moments

REPLY
@tiss

Do you know if the ilocecal valve is going to be removed too?

Jump to this post

Not to sure I did not ask her, is that something I should? What does the ilocecal valve do?

REPLY

It's the sphincter muscle at the junction of the ileum (last portion of your small intestine) andthe colon, first portion of your large intestine. Its function is to allow digested food to pass from the small intestine to your large intestine. It acts as a barrier between the large and small intestine. It prevents the backflow of harmful toxins and bacteria overgrowth into the small intestine. It also prevents food from entering the large intestine before it's effectively digested.

For me, it's caused a real problem with SIBO ( small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) — the resection site (anastomosis) is wide open with no valve so there is no way to keep bacteria out of the small intestine. I do take an antibiotic daily callled Xifaxan which has made my daily life 100% better.
You might want to ask your dr about what the plan is regarding removal of the valve. I have to warn you, many GI's downplay the significance of the IV.

REPLY
@tiss

It's the sphincter muscle at the junction of the ileum (last portion of your small intestine) andthe colon, first portion of your large intestine. Its function is to allow digested food to pass from the small intestine to your large intestine. It acts as a barrier between the large and small intestine. It prevents the backflow of harmful toxins and bacteria overgrowth into the small intestine. It also prevents food from entering the large intestine before it's effectively digested.

For me, it's caused a real problem with SIBO ( small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) — the resection site (anastomosis) is wide open with no valve so there is no way to keep bacteria out of the small intestine. I do take an antibiotic daily callled Xifaxan which has made my daily life 100% better.
You might want to ask your dr about what the plan is regarding removal of the valve. I have to warn you, many GI's downplay the significance of the IV.

Jump to this post

Thank you for that information, I will definitely speak to my GI and surgeon about that.

REPLY
@lovablesteven

Not to sure I did not ask her, is that something I should? What does the ilocecal valve do?

Jump to this post

Hello @lovablesteven

Since @tiss mentioned her problem with SIBO due to the removal of the ileocecal valve, I looked up a discussion on Connect that deals with this problem. If you take a look at those discussions you will see what @tiss is talking about. Here is the link (at the top of the discussion I suggest that you click on the box and select "Newest to Oldest" in order to get the most recent discussions first) https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/permanent-sibo-due-to-removal-of-ileocecal-valve/

As @tiss suggested, you might want to discuss the matter of the valve being removed next time you talk to your doctor about surgery and see if she anticipates removing that valve during surgery and how she might treat any SIBO problems.

@tiss, could you share how long you have been taking the Xifaxan? Did you start this antibiotic right after the surgery?

REPLY
@hopeful33250

Hello @lovablesteven

Since @tiss mentioned her problem with SIBO due to the removal of the ileocecal valve, I looked up a discussion on Connect that deals with this problem. If you take a look at those discussions you will see what @tiss is talking about. Here is the link (at the top of the discussion I suggest that you click on the box and select "Newest to Oldest" in order to get the most recent discussions first) https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/permanent-sibo-due-to-removal-of-ileocecal-valve/

As @tiss suggested, you might want to discuss the matter of the valve being removed next time you talk to your doctor about surgery and see if she anticipates removing that valve during surgery and how she might treat any SIBO problems.

@tiss, could you share how long you have been taking the Xifaxan? Did you start this antibiotic right after the surgery?

Jump to this post

I was not tested for SIBO until about a year after surgery when I changed to a new GI. The old GI never mentioned the possibility. I suffered a lot not only due to the nature of the surgery but then the SIBO. I tested positive and was given 3 separate month long trials of Xifaxan but it always returned after a few weeks. Then my doctor explained why the wide open anastomosis with no IV was unable to keep bacteria from backing up into the small intestine. He decided to put me on it indefinitely 2x day. I still had some problems, although was better. He bumped the Xifaxan up to 3 a day and it did the trick. I'm not sure every GI would be open to this but it's changed the quality of my life so much. Still have challenges but manage much better. The key is finding a great, open minded GI. My surgery was 31 months ago.

REPLY
@tiss

I was not tested for SIBO until about a year after surgery when I changed to a new GI. The old GI never mentioned the possibility. I suffered a lot not only due to the nature of the surgery but then the SIBO. I tested positive and was given 3 separate month long trials of Xifaxan but it always returned after a few weeks. Then my doctor explained why the wide open anastomosis with no IV was unable to keep bacteria from backing up into the small intestine. He decided to put me on it indefinitely 2x day. I still had some problems, although was better. He bumped the Xifaxan up to 3 a day and it did the trick. I'm not sure every GI would be open to this but it's changed the quality of my life so much. Still have challenges but manage much better. The key is finding a great, open minded GI. My surgery was 31 months ago.

Jump to this post

@tiss

Thanks for the additional information. Could you explain how they test for SIBO? What were your symptoms that led to the testing?

Your choice of a new GI doc was certainly a good one for you. How did you find this doctor, recommended by someone or did you research to find him?

REPLY
@hopeful33250

@tiss

Thanks for the additional information. Could you explain how they test for SIBO? What were your symptoms that led to the testing?

Your choice of a new GI doc was certainly a good one for you. How did you find this doctor, recommended by someone or did you research to find him?

Jump to this post

Bowel irregularities that happen after this type of surgery but just couldn't get better. Couldn't eat much, had constant bouts of diarrhea and a few bouts of bad constipation. Had bouts of urgency but inability to have a BM. Very uncomfortable all the time. I couldn't figure out what to eat. Still have issues with food but that's all trial and error after a resection. The test is so easy. It's a breath test. You drink lactulose a few hours before the test. You inhale from this tube , (which measures exhaled hydrogen and methane that help evaluate bacterial overgrowth) , and hold your breath until the nurse tells you to blow out. You do this several times. It takes a few hours. I got my results I believe the same day,

I found my new doctor by asking several friends who had digestive issues and 1 name in particular kept coming up. So I decided to try him and it has been a completely different experience than with the old GI.

REPLY
@tiss

It's the sphincter muscle at the junction of the ileum (last portion of your small intestine) andthe colon, first portion of your large intestine. Its function is to allow digested food to pass from the small intestine to your large intestine. It acts as a barrier between the large and small intestine. It prevents the backflow of harmful toxins and bacteria overgrowth into the small intestine. It also prevents food from entering the large intestine before it's effectively digested.

For me, it's caused a real problem with SIBO ( small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) — the resection site (anastomosis) is wide open with no valve so there is no way to keep bacteria out of the small intestine. I do take an antibiotic daily callled Xifaxan which has made my daily life 100% better.
You might want to ask your dr about what the plan is regarding removal of the valve. I have to warn you, many GI's downplay the significance of the IV.

Jump to this post

Hello,
I wanted to check in with you all. I feel better knowing there are other people like myself experiencing these symptoms. I was told by a GI at Mayo that I had slow motility and all I needed was fiber.These MD.s do not seem to think the lack of ICV is a problem. My issue is cramping (pain) daily. I have been taking Acacia fiber (Heather's), and it helps with constipation and diarrhea. I am also taking supplements, to reduce stress. Does anyone have pain after eating? If so, what do you take? I am receiving neurofeedback therapy to help me not react and go to that dark place, thoughts (automatically). I am hopeful that Life can get better.

REPLY

@bethy1962 , did you have a resection? I was actually told by a GI that the body learns to compensate for the lack of an IC. How could that happen? It's so maddening to have drs dismiss us! I'm sorry you are having pain. I do have pain and urgency sometimes after eating but not on a regular basis. Have you been checked for SIBO?

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment